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3 Negative Personality Traits That Might Actually Benefit You

3 Negative Personality Traits That Might Actually Benefit You

Have you ever been criticized for being easily distracted? Disorganized, maybe? Do people frequently tell you that your pessimism won’t take you anywhere?

Everyone has their own set of negative personality traits. While others go the extra mile for constant self-improvement, some do not even realize that what they’re like is not as ideal as they’d like to believe. Then there are the few who do notice their negative traits, but opt to see past them – gotta love yourself for who you are, flaws and all, right?

Here’s a pick-upper: it all boils down to perspective.

Some negative personality traits can actually be beneficial. Yes, you read that right. Below are a few of the most common negative personality traits that are said to do you more good than harm in the long run and how to use them to your advantage.

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Easily distracted 

Gone are the days when people tell you to avoid distractions when working on something big. Focus is a very vital part of success, but the role that distractions play is also quite significant.

In a feature written by Sam Anderson, for New York Magazine, he noted the symbiotic relationship between focus and distraction:

“[Focus] has distraction built into it. The two… [are] the systole and diastole of consciousness. Attention comes from the Latin to ‘stretch out’ or ‘reach toward’, distraction from ‘to pull apart’. We need both.”

When we are less focused, we are faced with a broader range of information; thus, we are more likely to consider things out of the box. Cindy May, from Scientific American, explained that the “wider scope gives us access to more alternatives and diverse interpretations, thus fostering innovation and insight.”

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Being “lazy”

So you prefer the easier way of doing things, does this really make you “lazy” if you’re getting the same ideal results?

Some would describe this as “intelligent” instead.

People with a preference of the easier process tend to innovate and develop smarter strategies towards attaining their objectives. Why exert more effort when you’ll be just as productive through an easier process?

This, however, remains situational. Not all of the best solutions have easier alternatives. Intelligence is reflected not only on how innovative one gets, but also based on how effective their tactics are.

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Negative mindset

Now you have a valid reason to roll your eyes whenever that old lady tells you that rainbow-colored optimism is the key to success. Contrary to popular belief, and ironically enough, having a negative mindset can actually reap positive results.

The American Psychological Association conducted an experiment on defensive pessimism and strategic optimism, and which mindset is likely to be more effective. The initial assumption was that strategic optimists would take the cake, but results showed that both were actually able to deliver quality outputs. Defensive pessimist respondents were said to have utilized their harnessed anxiety as motivation.

Psychologist Julie Norem wrote:

“At first, I asked how these people were able to do so well despite their pessimism. Before long, I began to realize that they were doing so well because of their pessimism… negative thinking transformed anxiety into action.”

Now what? Here are two things you need to consider:

Acknowledge these traits both as positive and negative.

Sure, you now know that these personality traits can be positive, but keep in mind that it’s solely situational. There were reasons why they have been dubbed as negative for the longest time, and this is because they’re not the most effective route to productivity and success. See them as two-sided concepts, their pros are always accompanied with the cons.

Learn to keep the balance.

If you’re set to maintain these traits as your own, find the equilibrium. Recognize that there are limitations to the positive side of the aforementioned traits. There are instances when being lazy would do you good, but in a general sense, hard work still has a greater pay-off.

Featured photo credit: StokPic.com via stokpic.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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