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3 Negative Personality Traits That Might Actually Benefit You

3 Negative Personality Traits That Might Actually Benefit You

Have you ever been criticized for being easily distracted? Disorganized, maybe? Do people frequently tell you that your pessimism won’t take you anywhere?

Everyone has their own set of negative personality traits. While others go the extra mile for constant self-improvement, some do not even realize that what they’re like is not as ideal as they’d like to believe. Then there are the few who do notice their negative traits, but opt to see past them – gotta love yourself for who you are, flaws and all, right?

Here’s a pick-upper: it all boils down to perspective.

Some negative personality traits can actually be beneficial. Yes, you read that right. Below are a few of the most common negative personality traits that are said to do you more good than harm in the long run and how to use them to your advantage.

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Easily distracted 

Gone are the days when people tell you to avoid distractions when working on something big. Focus is a very vital part of success, but the role that distractions play is also quite significant.

In a feature written by Sam Anderson, for New York Magazine, he noted the symbiotic relationship between focus and distraction:

“[Focus] has distraction built into it. The two… [are] the systole and diastole of consciousness. Attention comes from the Latin to ‘stretch out’ or ‘reach toward’, distraction from ‘to pull apart’. We need both.”

When we are less focused, we are faced with a broader range of information; thus, we are more likely to consider things out of the box. Cindy May, from Scientific American, explained that the “wider scope gives us access to more alternatives and diverse interpretations, thus fostering innovation and insight.”

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Being “lazy”

So you prefer the easier way of doing things, does this really make you “lazy” if you’re getting the same ideal results?

Some would describe this as “intelligent” instead.

People with a preference of the easier process tend to innovate and develop smarter strategies towards attaining their objectives. Why exert more effort when you’ll be just as productive through an easier process?

This, however, remains situational. Not all of the best solutions have easier alternatives. Intelligence is reflected not only on how innovative one gets, but also based on how effective their tactics are.

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Negative mindset

Now you have a valid reason to roll your eyes whenever that old lady tells you that rainbow-colored optimism is the key to success. Contrary to popular belief, and ironically enough, having a negative mindset can actually reap positive results.

The American Psychological Association conducted an experiment on defensive pessimism and strategic optimism, and which mindset is likely to be more effective. The initial assumption was that strategic optimists would take the cake, but results showed that both were actually able to deliver quality outputs. Defensive pessimist respondents were said to have utilized their harnessed anxiety as motivation.

Psychologist Julie Norem wrote:

“At first, I asked how these people were able to do so well despite their pessimism. Before long, I began to realize that they were doing so well because of their pessimism… negative thinking transformed anxiety into action.”

Now what? Here are two things you need to consider:

Acknowledge these traits both as positive and negative.

Sure, you now know that these personality traits can be positive, but keep in mind that it’s solely situational. There were reasons why they have been dubbed as negative for the longest time, and this is because they’re not the most effective route to productivity and success. See them as two-sided concepts, their pros are always accompanied with the cons.

Learn to keep the balance.

If you’re set to maintain these traits as your own, find the equilibrium. Recognize that there are limitations to the positive side of the aforementioned traits. There are instances when being lazy would do you good, but in a general sense, hard work still has a greater pay-off.

Featured photo credit: StokPic.com via stokpic.com

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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