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People Who Are Insanely Productive Have These 6 Things In Common

People Who Are Insanely Productive Have These 6 Things In Common

People who are insanely productive have developed habits that produce the most results. If you want to match their productivity, it’d be wise to follow their lead.

Moreover, as you discover the habits that work best for you, you’ll realize that they’ll ultimately make you work much better every day. Be consistent with these habits and you’ll reap the rewards.

Resolve to become more productive every week beginning today by adopting into your daily habits these 5 things insanely productive people have in common.

1. They begin each day with a focused mind

Focus is their key to productivity. They never allow their minds to wander when they begin a new work day.

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They accomplish this by removing possible distractions in their work area. They know that when people are continuously distracted it’s difficult to focus. An organized mind can accomplish much even in a short time; it gets into the groove and easily gets lost in the flow.

One of the most effective ways to remain focused is to make sure you’re comfortable while working. Make sure your chair and desk are at the right height so you can work with ease.

2. They make sure their weekly tasks contribute to a bigger goal.

They ask themselves how mundane tasks fit into the big picture. They look at each task’s significance in relation to their business goals and aspirations. This bigger reason motivates them to complete small tasks.

According to the author of “Smarter Faster Better,” Charles Duhigg, know the relevance of a small action toward a greater objective makes it easier to link our smaller efforts to our bigger goals.

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3. They master their time to master their life

It’s a given – time is the most precious asset. Each week we have a finite amount of time – 7 days with only 24 hours each.

Ultra-productive people know how to maximize each minute they have. They allot time for every task they need to do every day. This time constraint forces them to accomplish the task no matter what.

They unwind by taking breaks every time they complete an assignment. This will recharge their batteries in between tasks. They may listen to music, go for a short walk, or watch a relaxing video while sipping their favorite drink. That way, they can relax a bit before diving into a new assignment.

4. They understand the difference between “important” and “urgent”

Productive people know the difference between important and urgent. Professional organizer Alison Kero, founder of ACK Organizing, says it’s key to understand “important and urgent are two different things – many things are urgent, and that’s usually determined by someone who expects an immediate answer.”

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If you get sidetracked by urgent but unimportant issues, you waste your time solving needless things instead of paying attention to what matters.

5. They get rid of their current to-do list

If their to-do list is overloaded with items they weren’t able to do last week, or last month, they do something about it. They make changes.

Iyyappan Chandramouleeswaran suggests limiting your list to three to five items every day. This will make you more productive.

Conversely, Forbes contributor Kevin Kruse recommends ditching your to-do list altogether. Turns out, in interviews with extremely successful people, Kruse discovered that not one of them use to-do lists! Along with other reasons, to-do lists don’t account for time, so we tend to skip to the easiest tasks first.

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Instead of using to-do lists, Kruse suggests working with a calendar. This way, you can plan exactly which task to complete first and how much time you’ll spend on it.

6. They don’t work on a task more than once

They avoid putting things on hold to only have to deal with them again later. They tackle incoming chores once and move on. Many times people read the same email only to stop, close it, and later on open it again. Productive people handle items as they come up – or they delegate.

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Anthony Dejolde

TV/Radio personality who educates his audience on entrepreneurship, productivity, and leadership.

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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