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29 Quotes on Depression and the Healing Power of Photography

29 Quotes on Depression and the Healing Power of Photography

Have you ever felt stressed, down, or overwhelmed and gone straight to posting a photo to get it off your chest? That’s just a small glimpse into the introspective and healing power of photography, especially when you’re struggling with depression or anxiety.

Here are 29 quotes to help empower you towards a better life and handle depression through your photos.

1. “Every day over one billion photos are shared online and I believe we are standing on top of a massive opportunity to change how we see and talk about mental health.” – Bryce Evans

    2. “The language of photography is symbolic.” — Sebastiao Salgado

    3. “I wish more people felt that photography was an adventure the same as life itself and felt that their individual feelings were worth expressing. To me, that makes photography more exciting.” — Harry Callahan

    4. “The moment the shutter clicked, I felt a shift within me.” — Bryce Evans

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      5. “Because it’s free, easy to use, and high-quality, photography is now a fixture in our daily lives – something we take for granted.” — Peter Diamandis

      6. “The painter constructs, the photographer discloses.” ― Susan Sontag

      7. “We are making photographs to understand what our lives mean to us.” — Ralph Hattersley

      8. “You cannot see the light without the darkness.” — Bryce Evans

        9. “The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.”
        ― Dorothea Lange

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        10. “When I look at my old pictures, all I can see is what I used to be but am no longer. I think: What I can see is what I am not.”
        ― Aleksandar Hemon

        11. “A photograph is usually looked at- seldom looked into.”
        ― Ansel Adams

        12. “A great photograph is a full expression of what one feels about what is being photographed in the deepest sense and is thereby a true expression of what one feels about life in its entirety.” ― Ansel Adams

        13. “If we want to change how we see these issues – I think the very thing we need is a new lens to see them through” — Bryce Evans

          14. “It is through living that we discover ourselves, at the same time as we discover the world around us.”
          ― Henri Cartier-Bresson

          15. “To me, photography is an art of observation. It’s about finding something interesting in an ordinary place… I’ve found it has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.” — Elliott Erwitt

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          16. “There is only you and your camera. The limitations in your photography are in yourself, for what we see is what we are.” — Ernst Haas

          17. “When I first became interested in photography, I thought it was the whole cheese. My idea was to have it recognized as one of the fine arts. Today I don’t give a hoot in hell about that. The mission of photography is to explain man to man and each man to himself.” — Edward Steichen

          18. “Light makes photography. Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography.” — George Eastman

          19. “Imagine if every photo was an opportunity to start speaking out about your own depression” – Bryce Evans

            20. “Does not the very word ‘creative’ mean to build, to initiate, to give out, to act – rather than to be acted upon, to be subjective? Living photography is positive in its approach, it sings a song of life – not death.” — Berenice Abbott

            21. “Every photo and story is a practice of introspection, personal growth, and a vulnerable act of courage to build empathy.” — Bryce Evans

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            22. “How you see photos and what you see in them is a reflection of how you see the world.” — Bryce Evans

            23. “Photography, for me, is something I can control fully. It’s wholly my own expressions.” — Mia Wasikowska

            24. “Photography, as a powerful medium of expression and communications, offers an infinite variety of perception, interpretation and execution.” — Ansel Adams

            25. “One advantage of photography is that it’s visual and can transcend language.” — Lisa Kristine

            26. “With photography a new language has been created. Now for the first time it is possible to express reality by reality. We can look at an impression as long as we wish, we can delve into it and, so to speak, renew past experiences at will.” — Ernst Haas

            27. “With photography, you zero in; you put a lot of energy into short moments, and then you go on to the next thing.” — Robert Mapplethorpe

            28. “Photography must be integrated with the story.” — James Wong Howe

            29. “If you find yourself stuck in darkness, the first thing to do is find and start capturing the light.” – Bryce Evans

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              Bryce Evans

              Founder of The One Project

              29 Quotes on Depression and the Healing Power of Photography

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              Last Updated on October 16, 2018

              What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It

              What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It

              Are you afraid of being alone?  Do you worry about your physical safety or do you fear loneliness? These are strong negative feelings that can impact your health.

              One study found that when older people are socially isolated, there is an increased risk of an earlier death,[1] by as much as 26%.

              If you experience loneliness and are worried about your fear of being alone, study these 6 ways to help you find your comfort zone.

              But first, the good news!

              How many times have you said to yourself, ‘I just can’t wait to be alone’? This might be after a day’s work, an argument with your partner or after a noisy dinner with friends. You need time to be yourself, gather your thoughts, relish the silence and just totally chill out. These are precious moments and are very important for your own peace of mind and mental refreshment.

              But for many people, this feeling is not often present and loneliness takes over. As Joss Whedon once said,

              ‘Loneliness is about the scariest thing out there’.

              Read on and discover how you can exploit being alone to your own advantage and how you can defeat loneliness.

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              1. Embrace loneliness

              When you are alone, it is important to embrace it and enjoy it to the full.

              Wallow in the feeling that you do not have to be accountable for anything you do. Pursue your interests and hobbies. Take up new ones. Learn new skills. Lie on the couch. Leave the kitchen in a mess. The list can go on and on, but finding the right balance is crucial.

              There will be times when being on your own is perfect, but then there will be a creeping feeling that you should not be so isolated.

              When you start to enjoy being alone, these 10 amazing things will happen.

              Once you start feeling loneliness, then it is time to take action.

              2. Facebook is not the answer

              Have you noticed how people seek virtual contacts instead of a live, face-to-face interaction? It is true that social networking can provide an initial contact, but the chances of that becoming a real life personal contact is pretty slim.

              Being wrapped up in a cloud of sharing, liking and commenting (and insulting!) can only increase loneliness.

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              When you really want company, no one on Facebook will phone you to invite you out.

              3. Stop tolerating unhappy relationships

              It is a cruel fact of life that people are so scared of loneliness that they often opt into a relationship with the wrong person.

              There is enormous pressure from peers, family and society in general to get married or to be in a stable, long-term relationship. When this happens, people start making wrong decisions, such as:

              • hanging out with toxic company such as dishonest or untrustworthy people;
              • getting involved with unsuitable partners because of the fear of being alone or lonesome;
              • accepting inappropriate behavior just because of loneliness;
              • seeking a temporary remedy instead of making a long-term decision.

              The main problem is that you need to pause, reflect and get advice. Recognize that your fear of being alone is taking over. A rash decision now could lead to endless unhappiness.

              4. Go out and meet people

              It was the poet John Donne (1572 – 1631) who wrote:

              ‘No man is an island, entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent’.

              Human contact is essential to surviving in this world. Instead of wallowing in boredom and sadness, you need to get out as much as possible and seek contacts.

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              Being a member of a group, however tenuous, is a great way. So when you are in the gym, at church or simply at a club meeting, exploit these contacts to enlarge your social circle.

              There is no point in staying at home all the time. You will not meet any new people there!

              Social contacts are rather like delicate plants. You have to look after them. That means telephoning, using Skype and being there when needed.

              Take a look at this guide on How to Meet New People and Make Friends with The Best.

              5. Reach out to help someone in need

              A burden shared is a burden halved.

              Dag Hammarskjold was keenly aware of this fact when he said:

              ‘What makes loneliness an anguish is not that I have no one to share my burden but this: I have only my own burden to bear’.

              Simply put, it is a two-way street. Helping others actually helps yourself, here’s why.

              Reach out to help and people will be there when you need them.

              6. Be grateful and count your blessings

              Study after study shows that if people show gratitude, they will reap a bountiful harvest. These include a stronger immune system, better health, more positive energy and most important of all, feeling less lonely and isolated.

              If you do not believe me, watch the video below, ‘What good is gratitude?’  Now here is the path to hope and happiness:

              Featured photo credit: Anthony Tran via unsplash.com

              Reference

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