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8 Things That Prove Only Children Aren’t Spoilt But More Mature

8 Things That Prove Only Children Aren’t Spoilt But More Mature

I’ve faced this all my life. “Siblings?” they ask. “None,” I reply. “Oh, you’re an only child!” And I get raised eyebrows, sniggers, sneers, and even non-committal but pregnant murmuring. There’s a certain stigma attached to being an only child, the general perception that we are spoilt, petulant, and probably fit the word brat to a T. Seriously people, we aren’t all that different from you, and what you call our innate snootiness, is perhaps our inborn maturity.

Fact is, an only child has been dealing with being an only one all his or her life. And contrary to popular belief, being an only child is not a disease in itself. Don’t believe me? Read on to know what makes us strong, resilient, and mature.

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1. We’re not arrogant, we have higher IQs.

According to a study by the National Bureau of Economic Research, only children tend to have higher IQs, perform better in school, and are high achievers all their life – making them successful individuals on the whole. A lot of this has perhaps to do with the fact that only children get a lot of one-to-one attention with their parents.

2. What you call snobbishness, is our shyness.

Like everyone else who’s normal on a social front, we have friends, too. However, large groups tend to put us off – and when amidst too many people that we don’t know, we tend to be quieter. Don’t take this as us being snooty, we are merely trying to cope with our innate shyness.

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3. We tend to avoid conflict, and so usually get along.

As only children, we have missed out on the rough and tumble of siblings. We do not know how to fight it out with peers, and hardly know how to make up after that. So we try to avoid conflict on the whole, though we may sulk and walk around in a huff. Usually, this means we agree with the majority more often than we like to, and end up being labeled as team players, even if we really aren’t.

4. We are natural born worriers, but not bossy.

Only children are often labelled as being bossy and domineering. To an extent, this may hold true – since childhood, we’ve gone our way, unhampered by siblings. To a great level, this also means that we operate autonomously – it’s very often our way or the highway. This may make it difficult for people to get along with us, however – when it comes to family, it means that we very often take on the mantle of being the mother hen to every member.

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5. We have friends, but like our “me” time too.

How often do you hear people crib about having too much on their social plate? Not many of these complaining lot will be only children. Simply because as much as we like our friends and their company, we are used to spending some alone time and we value that highly – it keeps us sane!

6. We get along with authority figures.

We’ve dealt with authority figures all our lives. Unlike children with siblings, while we got all our parents’ love and affections, we bore the brunt of their temper single-handedly too. This means that early on, we learnt to deal with the adults and authority figures in our life – and this holds in good stead even when we ourselves are adults.

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7. We are our biggest critics, and competition.

Think because we didn’t face sibling rivalry, we are not competitive? Well then you are wrong. We are our biggest critics and tend to push ourselves into doing more, achieving more, and just trying to be more. Perhaps a result of us being the only person our parents could pin their hopes on. So love and affection sure, but we are also under intense pressure from our parents to succeed, however inadvertent.

8. We are not so very different from you.

Like all children, siblings or not, we pick up what we get from our parents and formative years and mold ourselves accordingly. Not having siblings does not make us any more or less weird – it just makes us what we all are – human, with our own unique foibles and follies. The thing about being an only child is that it is as normal as it not being one.

Remember that while being an only child may not make us special, it does not make us any less than a child who has had siblings. It is how it is, and only children make the best of it, like everyone else.

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Last Updated on September 17, 2019

10 Simple Ways To Always Think Positive Thoughts

10 Simple Ways To Always Think Positive Thoughts

Positive thinking can lead to a lot of positive change in your life. Developing an optimistic outlook can be good for both your physical and mental health.

But sometimes, certain situations arise in life that makes it hard to keep a positive outlook. Take steps to make positive thinking become more like your second nature and you’ll reap the biggest benefits.

Here are 10 ways to make thinking positive thoughts easy:

1. Spend Time with Positive People

If you surround yourself with constant complainers, their negativity is likely to rub off on you.

Spend time with positive friends and family members to increase the likelihood that their positive thinking habits will become yours too. It’s hard to be negative when everyone around you is so positive.

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2. Take Responsibility for Your Behavior

When you encounter problems and difficulties in life, don’t play the role of the victim. Acknowledge your role in the situation and take responsibility for your behavior.

Accepting responsibility can help you learn from mistakes and prevent you from blaming others unfairly.

3. Contribute to the Community

One of the best ways to feel good about what you have, is to focus on what you have to give.

Volunteer in some manner and give back to the community. Helping others can give you a new outlook on the world and can assist you with positive thinking.

4. Read Positive and Inspirational Materials

Spend time each day reading something that encourages positive thinking. Read the Bible, spiritual material, or inspirational quotes to help you focus on what’s important to you in life. It can be a great way to start and end your day.

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Some recommendations for you:

5. Recognize and Replace Negative Thoughts

You won’t be successful at positive thinking if you’re still plagued by frequent negative thoughts. Learn to recognize and replace thoughts that are overly negative. Often, thoughts that include words like “always” and “never” signal that they aren’t true.

If you find yourself thinking something such as, “I always mess everything up,” replace it with something more realistic such as, “Sometimes I make mistakes but I learn from them.”

There’s no need to make your thoughts unrealistically positive, but instead, make them more realistic.

6. Establish and Work Toward Goals

It’s easier to be positive about problems and setbacks when you have goals that you’re working toward. Goals will give you motivation to overcome those obstacles when you encounter problems along the way. Without clear goals, it’s harder to make decisions and gauge your progress.

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Learn to set SMART goals to help you achieve more.

7. Consider the Consequences of Negativity

Spend some time thinking about the consequences of negative thinking. Often, it can become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

For example, a person who thinks, “I probably won’t get this job interview,” may put less effort into the interview. As a result, he may decrease his chances of getting the job.

Create a list of all the ways negative thinking impacts your life. It likely influences your behavior, your relationships, and your feelings. Then, create a list of the ways in which positive thinking could be beneficial.

8. Offer Compliments to Others

Look for reasons to compliment others. Be genuine in your praise and compliments, but offer it frequently. This will help you look for the good in other people.

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9. Create a Daily Gratitude List

If you start keeping a daily gratitude list, you’ll start noticing exactly how much you have to be thankful for. This can help you focus on the positive in your life instead of thinking about all the bad things that have happened in the day.

Getting in the habit of showing an attitude of gratitude makes positive thinking more of a habit. Here’re 40 Simple Ways To Practice Gratitude.

10. Practice Self-Care

Take good care of yourself and you’ll be more equipped to think positively.

Get plenty of rest and exercise and practice managing your stress well. Taking care of your physical and mental health will provide you with more energy to focus on positive thinking.

Learn about these 30 Self-Care Habits for a Strong and Healthy Mind, Body and Spirit.

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Featured photo credit: DESIGNECOLOGIST via unsplash.com

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