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People Who Were Scouts And Guides Are Mentally Healthier For Their Entire Lives

People Who Were Scouts And Guides Are Mentally Healthier For Their Entire Lives

A new study conducted by the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh shows that scouts and guides have an improved mental health later in their lives. Children who take part in such organizations are likely to develop resilience and abilities that help them in difficult times. These qualities include decision making, self-reliance and a desire for learning by themselves, which often encourage being active outdoors.

People who were scouts and guides are less likely prone to mental illness

Scientists also found that on average by the time scouts and guides reached middle age, they were 15 percent less likely to be affected by depression or mental illness compared to others. This effect was even reduced to those people from poorer backgrounds with a high risk of such disorders.

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To conduct this study, the National Child Development Study (NCDS), one of the British best resources for health and social research, analyzed long-run data from a group of people born in England in November 1958. Through periodical interviews of the group, results on how a participant’s health and life developed over a period were recorded.

The striking aspect about NCDS is that it collects lots of information about the life conditions of the participants. For instance, the type of family and home a child grew, their parents’ health, job, education attitude and ambition for their child’s future was taken into account.

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Such details are crucial to ascertain that the results identified corresponded to a real relationship. NCDS also considered the participants’ family background, and the impacts they may have on their health later in life.

The leading researcher, Professor Chris Dibben, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Geosciences supported the study by saying “It is quite startling that this benefit is found in people so many years after they have attended guides or scouts.”

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Therefore, even though this study concentrated on a group born over 50 years ago, it seems that the standards of the groups remain unchanged. Also, similar benefits could be drawn from membership for children these days.  Given the increasing levels of poor mental health and stress in younger people, it would be helpful for parents or guardians to encourage participation of these youth programs.

The effect is more significant for children from less well-off families

Since scouting and guiding involve children from various social backgrounds, it is wise to conclude that good mental health should not only be attributed to better living standards or wealthier children.  Even though people from poorer backgrounds are more likely to experience poor mental health, this situation was offset by participating in the scouting or guiding association. Therefore, it would seem that encouraging involvement in poorer groups is crucial.

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Moreover, research suggests that joining the scouts and guides may help strengthen a person’s likelihoods of accomplishing more in life with better mental health or it may create resilience against everyday stresses in life. So, such people are less likely to suffer from stresses or mental issues, a reason to be proud of if you had been a scout and guide before.

Finally, mental health complications in the middle-aged people are increasingly common, and cost people and society a lot of impact in both emotional and financial terms. Also, the health gaps between poorer and rich people remain a significant problem. Scouts and guides activities are not expensive, and they are available worldwide. Possibly they could contribute to a successful policy response to people with mental problems or stress.

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Alex Johnson

Professional Writer and Blogger

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Last Updated on May 15, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

When we are still children, our thoughts seem to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

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Just imagine then how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power! We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities. We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb. We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits. We’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head.

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

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So…how exactly are we to achieve that?

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are a few ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

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2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty. If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what is really important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

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4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking. It is like watching a DVD that saddens and frustrates you, completely pulling you down. Eject that old DVD, throw it away and insert a new, better, more hopeful one instead.

So, instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember: You are (or will become) what you think you are. This is reason enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

Featured photo credit: Kyaw Tun via unsplash.com

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