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3 Times Men Took Credit for Women’s Accomplishments

3 Times Men Took Credit for Women’s Accomplishments

If, like me, you watched the five proposals that took place during the recent Olympics in Rio and felt that what should have been a proud moment celebrating years of hard work and dedication was overshadowed by their partner’s need to take some of the credit, or lay claim to their prize in public, then Chinese diver Qin Kai’s proposal to his silver medalist girlfriend He Zi, during her medal ceremony would have proven a particularly uncomfortable viewing.

Despite the fact that she said “yes,” this one, of all the public declarations of love, felt inappropriate. This was compounded by the fact that He Zi herself seemed less than jubilant at the sudden interruption of what was probably already the best moment of her life. Qin’s storming of the stage during his girlfriend’s well-deserved moment of celebration, whatever the intent, stole focus from all of the medalists and threw the spotlight on a man during these women’s big moments — not to mention that Qin Kai had enjoyed his own interruption-free ceremony earlier that day when he won a bronze medal.

This is not the only time that a man has stolen a woman’s thunder. In fact there are several times when men have seen fit to jump in and take credit for women’s accomplishments, or steal focus during their big moment.

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1. Kanye and Taylor

men took credit kanye taylor

    No one can forget the time that Kanye West stormed the stage at the 2009 Video Music Awards and interrupted Taylor Swift’s acceptance speech for Best Female Video. Mistakenly believing that he was in charge of deciding which woman should get the accolade, the rapper took the microphone from a fresh faced T-Swizz and claimed Beyonce had “one of the best videos of all time.” This was a claim which the VMAs clearly seconded as they awarded her Video of the Year, later that night. Beyonce then donated her time on stage to Taylor, effectively meaning that two famous females were denied their moment of glory thanks to Yeezy.

    But it was earlier this year that Kanye really stole Tay Tay’s thunder. On his track “Famous” the rapper claimed that Swift’s career and position as one of the most successful pop stars of all time was actually all thanks to him, claiming “I made that b**** famous.” Luckily, Taylor got revenge earlier this year, ironically during her acceptance speech after winning a Grammy for “Album of the Year,” saying:

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    “I want to say to all the young women out there: there are going to be people along the way who will try to undercut your success or take credit for your accomplishments or your fame. But if you just focus on the work and you don’t let those people sidetrack you, someday when you get where you’re going, you’ll look around and you will know that it was you and the people who love you who put you there. And that will be the greatest feeling in the world. Thank you for this moment.”

    2. Laura Olin and the Men of Twitter

    During Hillary Clinton’s historic acceptance of the Democratic nomination a few weeks ago, writer and Democratic strategist Laura Olin tweeted a clever meme summing up the importance of the last two Democratic candidates for diversity in the otherwise old, male and pale lineup. However, it was widely noted that shortly after that, many men started to post the exact same tweet, without crediting Laura as the source.

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    men took credit laura olin

      Twitter etiquette demands that original content is credited, and the irony of a woman posting a celebration of women’s accomplishments only for it to be stolen and posted by a man, was not lost on the rest of twitter.

      men took credit stolen tweet
        3. Donald Trump and Lady Gaga

        What would a list of men being unfair to women be without a reference to Donald Trump? In his 2011 book, Trump claimed that he had “at least something to do with” the phenomenal success of singer Lady Gaga. He claimed that: “She became a big star and maybe she became a star because I put her on the Miss Universe pageant. It’s very possible, who knows what would have happened without it, because she caused a sensation.”

        Not only is this a completely deluded view of his influence, but also a completely skewed understanding of his audience base, as it is debatable that many would-be “Little Monsters” tuned into the Miss Universe pageant.

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        men took credit lady gaga

          Featured photo credit: Eva Rinaldi via flickr.com

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          Grace Garland

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          3 Times Men Took Credit for Women’s Accomplishments

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          Last Updated on October 23, 2018

          Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

          Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally

          My mother was a great knitter and produced some wonderful garments such as Aran sweaters which were extremely fashionable when I was young. She also knitted while my father drove, which caused great amusement. I often wondered why she did that but I think I know the answer now.

          Knitting is good for your mental health, according to some research studies. The Washington Post mentions a 2013 survey of about 3,500 knitters who were asked how they felt after a knitting session. Over 80% of them said they definitely felt happier. It is not a totally female occupation as more and more men take it up to get the same benefits. Harry Styles (One Direction) enjoys knitting. So does Russell Crowe although he does it to help him with anger management!

          The Neural Knitwork Project

          In Australia, Neural Knitworks was started to encourage people to knit and also become aware of neuroscience and mental health issues. Knit-ins were organized but garments were not the only things created. The knitters produced handmade neurons (1,665 of them!) to make a giant brain. The 2015 project will make more neural knitted networks (neural knitworks) and they will be visible online. You can see some more examples of woolly neurons on the Neural Knitworks Facebook page.

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          While people knitted, crocheted and crafted yarn, they listened to experts talking about mental health issues such as addiction, dementia, depression, and how neurons work.

          The knitting and neural connection

          The human brain has about 80 billion neurons. Learning new skills, social interaction, and physical activity all help to forge neural connections which keep the brain healthy and active. They are creating networks to control movement and make memories. The knitters learn that as they create the woollen neurons, their own neurons are forming new pathways in their brains. Their creations are mimicking the processes in their brains to a certain extent. At the same time, their brains are registering new and interesting information as they learn interesting facts about the brain and how it works. I love the knitworks and networks pun. What a brilliant idea!

          More mental health benefits from knitting

          Betsan Corkhill is a physiotherapist and has published some results of completed studies on her website, appropriately named Stitchlinks. She conducted some experiments herself and found that knitting was really helpful in reducing panic and anxiety attacks.

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          “You are using up an awful lot of brain capacity to perform a coordinated series of movements. The more capacity you take up by being involved in a complex task, the less capacity you have for bad thoughts.”- Betsan Corkhill

          Knitters feel happier and in a better mood

          Ann Futterman-Collier, Well Being Lab at Northern Arizona University, is very interested in how textile therapy (sewing, knitting, weaving and lace-making) can play an important role in mood repair and in lifting depressive states.

          She researched 60 women and divided them into three different groups to do some writing, meditating and work with textiles. She monitored their heartbeat, blood pressure and saliva production. The women in the textiles group had the best results when their mood was assessed afterwards. They were in a better mood and had managed to reduce their negative thoughts better than those in the writing and meditation groups.

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          “People who were given the task to make something actually had less of an inflammatory response in the face of a ‘stressor’.” – Dr. Futterman Collier

          The dopamine effect on our happiness

          Our brains produce a chemical called dopamine. This helps us to feel happy, more motivated, and assists also with focus and concentration. We get a boost of dopamine after sex, food, exercise, sleep, and creative activities.

          There are medications to increase dopamine but there are lots of ways we can do it naturally. Textile therapy and crafting are the easiest and cheapest. We can create something and then admire it. In addition, this allows for a little bit of praise and congratulations. Although this is likely not your goal, all these can boost our dopamine and we just feel happier and more fulfilled. These are essential in facing new challenges and coping with disappointment in life.

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          “Sometimes, people come up to me when I am knitting and they say things like, “Oh, I wish I could knit, but I’m just not the kind of person who can sit and waste time like that.” How can knitting be wasting time? First, I never just knit; I knit and think, knit and listen, knit and watch. Second, you aren’t wasting time if you get a useful or beautiful object at the end of it.” – Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, At Knit’s End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much.

          If you thought knitting and textiles were for old ladies, think again!

          Featured photo credit: DSC_0012/Mary-Frances Main via flickr.com

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