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Artist Reconnects With His Mom With Dementia Through His Camera

Artist Reconnects With His Mom With Dementia Through His Camera

When artist Tony Luciani’s elderly mother Elia moved in with him, he didn’t see it as a burden. Instead, he saw it as an opportunity to start a wonderful project with his new camera — he needed a subject and Elia was the perfect model.

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    Timeless Memories

    Elia suffers from dementia, meaning she often recalls memories from years gone by but can’t remember the last minute, hour, or day. Tony decided to use this as inspiration for testing out his new camera — a short-term project that was to span almost 2 years.

    The series of photos portray Elia’s dementia in a unique and personal way, fusing her distant memories with her current reality.

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          From One Caregiver To Another

          Tony describes how his mother was always his caregiver but now the roles have reversed. He wanted to include Elia in the project to make her feel productive and show his true love and adoration for her.

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          “She’s always been someone who participated and gave more than she received.”

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            More Than Just Another Art Project

            Elia is still pretty active and goes for small walks often, stopping by a bench or sitting under a tree by herself.

            Although looking after his elderly mother has been lonely at times, Tony believes the photography has given back more than he could have asked for.

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            “I’m doing more work, and I’m not at the beach. I’m at the studio and I’m creating and I’m doing photographs,” he said. “And with her here as my model, it’s every artist’s dream to have a model that I can call — and there she is.”

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                  Dealing With The Heartache Of Dementia

                  Tony says the project has been successful due to the love he has for his mother and has helped him really re-evaluate the relationship he has with her.

                  Dementia can be emotionally hard on the loved ones of those suffering with the disease, but finding a truly involving and productive way to explore and deal with the journey has helped both Tony and Elia in their life together.

                  “Here I thought, initially, I was going to be the brave guy and take her into my home, rather than shoving her into a nursing home or assisted living, and having my life disrupted and all that. But what I got out of it was more than I gave.”

                  Featured photo credit: Tony Luciani via tonyluciani.ca

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                  Jenny Marchal

                  Freelance Writer

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                  Last Updated on December 16, 2018

                  12 Simple Ways You Can Build A Positive Attitude

                  12 Simple Ways You Can Build A Positive Attitude

                  We all look for a better and happier life, but somehow we realize it’s our attitude that makes it hard to lead the life we want. How can we build a positive attitude? Grant Mathews has listed out the things (from the easiest to the hardest) we can do to cultivate this attitude on Quora:

                  1. Listen to good music.

                  Music definitely improves your mood, and it’s a really simple thing to do.

                  2. Don’t watch television passively.

                  Studies have shown that people who watch TV less are happier, which leads me to my next point…

                  3. Don’t do anything passively.

                  Whenever I do something, I like to ask myself if, at the end of the day, I would be content saying that I had spent time doing it. (This is why I block sites I find myself wasting too much time on. I enjoy them, but they’re just not worth it when I could be learning something new, or working on projects I care about.)

                  Time is incredibly valuable.

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                  4. Be aware of negativity

                  A community that considers itself intelligent tends to be negativity because criticizing is seen as a signaling mechanism to indicate that you’re more intelligent than the person you corrected. This was irrationally frustrating for me – it’s one of those things you’ll stay up all night to think about.

                  5. Make time to be alone.

                  I initially said “take time just to be alone.” I changed it because if you don’t ensure you can take a break, you’ll surely be interrupted.

                  Being with other people is something you can do to make you happy, but I don’t include it in this list because nearly everyone finds time to talk with friends. On the other hand, spending time just with yourself is almost considered a taboo.

                  Take some time to figure out who you are.

                  6. Exercise.

                  This is the best way to improve your immediate happiness.

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                  Exercise probably makes you happy. Try and go on a run. You’ll hate yourself while doing it, but the gratification that you get towards the end vastly outweighs the frustration of the first few attempts. I can’t say enough good things about exercise.

                  Exercising is also fantastic because it gives you time alone.

                  7. Have projects.

                  Having a goal, and moving towards it, is a key to happiness.

                  You have to realize though that achieving the goal is not necessarily what makes you happy – it’s the process. When I write music, I write it because writing is inherently enjoyable, not because I want to get popular (as if!).

                  8. Take time to do the things you enjoy.

                  That’s very general, so let me give you a good example.

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                  One of the things that has really changed my life was finding small communities centered around activities I enjoy. For instance, I like writing music, so I’m part of a community that meets up to write a song for an hour every week. I love the community. I’ve also written a song every week, 37 weeks in a row, which has gradually moved me towards larger goals and makes me feel very satisfied.

                  9. Change your definition of happiness.

                  Another reason I think I’m more happy than other people is because my definition of happiness is a lot more relaxed than most people’s. I don’t seek for some sort of constant euphoria; I don’t think it’s possible to live like that. My happiness is closer to stability.

                  10. Ignore things that don’t make you happy.

                  I get varying reactions to this one.

                  The argument goes “if something is making you unhappy, then you should find out why and improve it, not ignore it.” If you can do that, great. But on the other hand, there’s no reason to mope about a bad score on a test.

                  There’s another counterargument: perhaps you’re moping because your brain is trying to work out how to improve. In fact, this is the key purpose of depression: Depression’s Upside – NYTimes.com

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                  I can think of examples that go both ways. I remember, for instance, when I was debating a year or two ago and my partner and I would lose a round, I would mull over what we had done wrong for a long time. In that way, I got immensely better at debate (and public speaking in general – did you know debate has amazing effects on your public speaking ability? But now I really digress).

                  On the other hand, there’s no way that mulling over how dumb you were for missing that +x term on the left hand side will make you better at math. So stop worrying about it, and go practice math instead.

                  11. Find a way to measure your progress, and then measure it.

                  Video games are addictive for a reason: filling up an experience bar and making it to the next level is immensely satisfying. I think that it would be really cool if we could apply this concept to the real world.

                  I put this near the bottom of the list because, unfortunately, this hasn’t been done too often in the real world – startup idea, anyone? So you would have to do it yourself, which is difficult when you don’t even know how much you’ve progressed.

                  For a while, I kept a log of the runs I had taken, and my average speed. It was really cool to see my improvement over the weeks. (Also, I was exercising. Combining the two was fantastic for boosting happiness.)

                  12. Realize that happiness is an evolutionary reward, not an objective truth.

                  It’s easy to see that this is correct, but this is at the bottom of the list for a reason.

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