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5 Ways to Prevent Buyer’s Remorse & Become a Savvy Shopper

5 Ways to Prevent Buyer’s Remorse & Become a Savvy Shopper

We have all known that sinking feeling as we are purchasing something. You can already sense the regret kicking in. The shop teller looks at whatever mistake you’ve made – a heavy lunch, jeans that are too small, a shirt that reads “I love Darwin!” – and smiles.

They know it’s wrong and so do you, yet the transaction continues. If it’s any consolation, you’re not alone. A new study, the “Decision Drivers Report” by Choosi, has found that nearly 1 in 3 Australians have experienced buyer’s remorse. To make matters worse, the same study discovered that 90 per cent of Aussies find making decisions difficult these days, due to more choice and less time. So how can you navigate this never ending maze without making some seriously costly mistakes?

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Read on for the top 5 ways to avoid buyer’s remorse while becoming a smart shopper.

Pick Your Moment and Plan Ahead

The study found that nearly half of Australians are likely to regret their purchase when shopping with emotion. So if you’ve had a tough day at work or are going through a brutal break up, don’t treat yourself with a trip to the shops. The best way to beat emotion is by writing a list – guaranteed to result in practical purchases only. The same goes for spontaneous shopping. If you fail to plan, you plan to fail. Buyer’s remorse and impulsive shopping go hand-in-hand. In fact, one in three Australians are more likely to make an impulsive decision when hungry. So instead of shopping while starving, eat first or take snacks with you. It’ll save you money in the long run.

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Hold Back on Holiday

Sure that floral print suit may seem like a great idea when you’re living it up in Hawaii, but when you get home, you’ll realise what a horrible mistake you’ve made. The Choosi study found that half of Australians are less rational and more reckless with their hard earned cash when they’re on holidays. Instead of buying up big because you’re away, try to set a daily dollar amount. That way you’ll maintain a sense of control, while still allowing yourself to get a little crazy.

Don’t let the Guilt Get to You

Every parent knows the pain and suffering that comes with spoiling their kids. At first it seems like a good idea, a simple way of showing affection. But once the standard is set, you can’t walk past a shop without hearing the soundtrack to their desire. “But Mum/Dad, I want it, I need it.” Research supports that feeling, with data revealing Australian parents are less cautious with their spending when spoiling their children. Don’t let the guilt get to you, instead opt for the delay and distract tactic. It’s also worth pointing out to your little ones all the different ways you spoil them already!

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Cooling Off Period

Even if a particular purchase seems like a good idea at the time, chances are you won’t end up using it. It’s all in the evidence, with the research proving that 70% of Aussies have bought things they’ve never used. This is even easier to do in the internet age, with 1 in 5 people admitting they tend to throw logic out window when shopping online. Commit to a cooling off period on any purchase that isn’t completely necessary. This way you can take a week to see how you feel about the transaction before totally jumping in. Statistics prove that you may change your mind (and save a little money), if you pause before purchasing.

Phone a Friend

Speaking of online, it doesn’t pay to just go digital when making big decisions. Australians still value actual advice from friends or family, as opposed to researching online. And yet we’re increasingly making major purchases – insurance, cars, homes – without seeking the support of our nearest and dearest. While the online world is full of wonderful comparisons, advice and opportunity, never underestimate the benefit of a good old fashioned chit chat.

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Last Updated on June 20, 2019

Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’

Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’

There’s nothing quite like picking up a guitar and strumming out some chords. Listening to someone playing the guitar can be mesmerising, it can evoke emotion and a good guitar riff can bring out the best of a song. Many guitar players find a soothing, meditative quality to playing, along with the essence of creating music or busting out an acoustic version of their favourite song. But how does playing the guitar affect the brain?

More and more scientific studies have been looking into how people who play the guitar have different brain functions compared to those who don’t. What they found was quite astonishing and backed up what many guitarists may instinctively know deep down.

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Guitar Players’ Brains Can Synchronise

You didn’t read that wrong! Yes, a 2012 study[1] was conducted in Berlin that looked at the brains of guitar players. The researchers took 12 pairs of players and got them to play the same piece of music while having their brains scanned.

During the experiment, they found something extraordinary happening to each pair of participants – their brains were synchronising with each other. So what does this mean? Well, the neural networks found in the areas of the brain associated with social cognition and music production were most activated when the participants were playing their instruments. In other words, their ability to connect with each other while playing music was exceptionally strong.

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Guitar Players Have a Higher Intuition

Intuition is described as “the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning” and this is exactly what’s happening when two people are playing the guitar together.

The ability to synchronise their brains with each other, stems from this developed intuitive talent indicating that guitar players have a definite spiritual dexterity to them. Not only do their brains synchronise with another player, but they can also even anticipate what is to come before and after a set of chords without consciously knowing. This explains witnessing a certain ‘chemistry’ between players in a band and why many bands include brothers who may have an even stronger connection.

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This phenomenon is actually thought to be down to the way guitarists learn how to play – while many musicians learn through reading sheet music, guitar players learn more from listening to others play and feeling their way through the chords. This also shows guitarists have exceptional improvisational skills[2] and quick thinking.

Guitar Players Use More of Their Creative, Unconscious Brain

The same study carried out a different experiment, this time while solo guitarists were shredding. They found that experienced guitar players were found to deactivate the conscious part of their brain extremely easily meaning they were able to activate the unconscious, creative and less practical way of thinking more efficiently.

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This particular area of the brain – the right temporoparietal junction – typically deactivates with ‘long term goal orientation’ in order to stop distractions to get goals accomplished. This was in contrast to the non-guitarists who were unable to shut off the conscious part of their brain which meant they were consciously thinking more about what they were playing.

This isn’t to say that this unconscious way of playing can’t be learnt. Since the brain’s plasticity allows new connections to be made depending on repeated practice, the guitar player’s brain can be developed over time but it’s something about playing the guitar in particular that allows this magic to happen.

Conclusion

While we all know musicians have very quick and creative brains, it seems guitar players have that extra special something. Call it heightened intuition or even a spiritual element – either way, it’s proven that guitarists are an exceptional breed unto themselves!

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Featured photo credit: Lechon Kirb via unsplash.com

Reference

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