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Why Successful People Choose To Wear The Same Thing Every Day

Why Successful People Choose To Wear The Same Thing Every Day
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In a fashion-conscious society, the clothes that we wear often represent the way we portray our inner selves to the world. It can show aspects of our personality in a number of ways through creativity but it can even show a person’s particular mindset.

When someone decides to dress for success you would imagine a wardrobe full of outfits for every occasion – ready to impress at any opportunity and to create an impact. After all, we’re told appearances matter when it comes to success but does this actually mean we need a plethora of outfits?

More and more successful people are owning up to creating minimal wardrobes – opting to wear the same outfit every day. While this may seem to negate the idea of ‘dress for success’ there are very valid reasons why successful people opt to choose this way of dressing.

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1. It Saves You Time

The most obvious reason is that wearing the same outfit every day means less time wasted. Our morning routines can reflect how successful we are in the rest of our day and we often don’t realise how much time is taken up with unnecessary options when it comes to choosing the clothes we wear. By eliminating the need to pick and choose, successful people create more time by having a quicker and more efficient morning routine that transcends into the rest of their day and adds to their success mindset.

2. Safe In The Knowledge That You Have That One Successful Outfit

When we have what seems like an infinite amount of options of what to wear, not only does it take up time deciding on an outfit but it creates a situation where we have many items of clothing that don’t always mix and match. Having many clothes may give the illusion of having loads of different options but in reality we probably only end up wearing the same round of clothes each time. By having a small amount of high-quality versatile items we may be shrinking our options, but we will always have a go-to, high-quality outfit that will do the job every time.

3. It Creates Less Stress

Even when we’ve made that important decision on what to wear, we can start to question our choice throughout the day. You can start to wonder if you wear the right shoes, if you’re too overdressed or underdressed. When these doubts enter your mind you can start to stress more about the day ahead and may trigger unwanted anxiety. When you have one particular outfit that gives you confidence and suits a wide range of situations, you eliminate that worry and your energy is focused on the successes of the day.

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4. Eliminates Decisions

We often have a multitude of decisions to make in just one day. Whether important or fleeting, these decisions can mean the difference between success and less success. Being bogged down with decisions can sometimes do damage to our mindset – never underestimate the power of eliminating one unnecessary decision from your daily routine. Any chance to free up space in the mind will help towards focusing on more important tasks.

Barak Obama is rarely seen moving away from his uniform blue or grey suits and there’s a very particular reason for this.

“You’ll see I wear only grey or blue suits. I’m trying to pare down decisions. I don’t want to make decisions about what I’m eating or wearing. Because I have too many other decisions to make.”

In other words, having one less decision to worry about will help towards making better and more well thought-out decisions later.

5. Less Maintenance and Organisation

Having a smaller wardrobe means less energy maintaining and organising it. Successful people like to put their energy into important tasks and having a large variety of clothes means more time doing tasks such as washing, drying and ironing. Not only that but the clothes take up valuable space. Our possessions and the amount we have can say a lot about us, with clutter and too much stuff showing a disorganised mind. Freeing up storage space will not only lead to less need for organisation time but also gives you a sense of space both literally in your wardrobe and in your mind.

6. It Forces You To Change Your Relationship With Clothes

The actress Drew Barrymore talked about how she decided to try and change her relationship with clothes as she gets older. In a world where clothes are a huge fashion statement and material consumption is at an all-time high, many people are changing the way clothes rule their lives. Barrymore says:

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“For starters, I’m almost 40, and the 20s clothes don’t make sense anymore. And, after two babies, the 30s clothes don’t fit anymore. I am at a clothing crossroads, and it’s a painful one at times.”

By limiting her wardrobe Barrymore says she became “sane and happy” and at peace with the notion of getting dressed in the morning no longer being a difficult feat full of deliberating decisions.

7. Eliminate The Unnecessary Expense

As mentioned in the last point, material consumption is extremely high with our society’s ‘buy and throw-away’ attitude and we end up with a lot of unnecessary items. This is also true for our wardrobes – how many items of clothing have you never worn or are waiting for that perfect occasion that never comes?

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We often delude ourselves that the items hanging in the closet are somehow crucial but we often over-spend on clothes that we don’t really need. By throwing out these items and keeping our clothes collection minimal, we train the mind into realising we don’t need as much as we think. Our need to impulse buy is greatly limited and we become more mindful of the amount of ‘things’ we actually need.

So perhaps it’s time to try the minimal wardrobe technique. Take a leaf out of the book of those people who have made the choice to free themselves from one less daily decision and still dress for success with that one single, dependable and successful outfit.

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Jenny Marchal

A passionate writer who loves sharing about positive psychology.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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