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Why Meditation Should Be A Part Of School Education

Why Meditation Should Be A Part Of School Education

Proponents of meditation who support the positive results and outcomes from this exercise believe that this practice should be a critical component in schools for the benefit of students of all ages. In fact, even the Dalai Lama noted once that if every eight-year-old in the world was taught meditation, “we will eliminate violence from the world within one generation.”

In today’s society, people become overly preoccupied with work and their social lives that they lose sight of who they truly are, deep down inside. People morph themselves in many ways in order to fit in, whether it’s with their family, at the office or with a group of friends. This also can cause people to become self-centered and lose sight of the world around them. But some fans of meditation believe that if humans felt at peace with themselves, in tune with themselves, from an early age and were taught meditation in school, they would tap into their passion, their creativity, their interests, and core.

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Benefits Of Meditation

There are many perks of meditation, especially in helping school-aged students excel not just academically, but personally and spiritually. One study by Harvard University professors Sara Lazara and Catherine Kerr showed that this form of mental exercise, when regularly practiced, can bring about changes in a person’s mental state and resting electroencephalogram patterns that continue even once the meditation session is done. In this study, Lazar and Kerr concluded that regular sessions of meditation could be directly linked to an increased thickness in the subset of cortical regions in the brain related to somatosensory, auditory, visual and interoceptive processing. It also slowed the age-related thinning of the frontal cortex. People who practice meditation are less prone to stress, worry and illness.

In a study conducted by Robert Schneider, Clarence Grim and Maxwell Rainforth, a group of people who suffered from coronary heart disease took part in either a transcendental meditation program or a health education program. After 5.5 years in the study, the group that participated in the transcendental meditation program showed a 48 percent reduction in their risk of heart attack and stroke.

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Meditation also has brain-boosting power. A study by Giuseppe Pagnoni and Milos Cekic compared the gray matter in the brains of people who practiced Zen meditation versus non-meditators over a considerable period of time. While gray matter typically shrinks with age, the gray matter of those Zen meditators was not reduced at all.

Meditation Is Not A Religion

Meditation is not a religion, but rather a practice or exercise, supporters say. The term meditation refers either to a state of mind or to the practices and techniques utilized to meditate.

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Meditation Heightens Mindfulness

In a sizable study of more than 3,5,00 people who participated in mindfulness meditation programs, the study leaders Madhav Goyal and Sonal Singh detected evidence of decreased anxiety, a drop in depression and a reduction in pain levels.

Meditation In Schools

It isn’t too late for the next generation still in school to reap the benefits of mindful meditation. Activist Will Stanton recently wrote a book called Education Revolution that proposes a new global education model called The Six Dimension Model that focuses on meditation. Stanton believes that students who engage in meditation in school would bond with all living things and feel less of a need to compete with peers.

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Meditation’s goal is to promote relaxation, build an internal energy or life force and develop compassion, love, generosity, patience and instill forgiveness. While there are different forms of meditation that have been linked to numerous religious traditions and beliefs, it is designed to merely cleanse the mind and soul of concerns, and even boost health. Meditation can be done sitting, standing or even while carrying out daily tasks like Buddhist monks do. But no matter how you try it, you will enjoy the benefits of meditation and our world just may be a better place if it is introduced in the school system.

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Last Updated on February 13, 2019

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

Think being happy is something that happens as a result of luck, circumstance, having money, etc.? Think again.

Happiness is a mindset. And if you’re looking to improve your ability to find happiness, then check out these 10 things happy people do differently.

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions. -Dalai Lama

1. Happy people find balance in their lives.

Folks who are happy have this in common: they’re content with what they have, and don’t waste a whole lot of time worrying and stressing over things they don’t. Unhappy people do the opposite: they spend too much time thinking about what they don’t have. Happy people lead balanced lives. This means they make time for all the things that are important to them, whether it’s family, friends, career, health, religion, etc.

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2. Happy people abide by the golden rule.

You know that saying you heard when you were a kid, “Do unto others as you would have them do to you.” Well, happy people truly embody this principle. They treat others with respect. They’re sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of other people. They’re compassionate. And they get treated this way (most of the time) in return.

3. Happy people don’t sweat the small stuff.

One of the biggest things happy people do differently compared to unhappy people is they let stuff go. Bad things happen to good people sometimes. Happy people realize this, are able to take things in stride, and move on. Unhappy people tend to dwell on minor inconveniences and issues, which can perpetuate feelings of sadness, guilt, resentment, greed, and anger.

4. Happy people take responsibility for their actions.

Happy people aren’t perfect, and they’re well aware of that. When they screw up, they admit it. They recognize their faults and work to improve on them. Unhappy people tend to blame others and always find an excuse why things aren’t going their way. Happy people, on the other hand, live by the mantra:

“There are two types of people in the world: those that do and those that make excuses why they don’t.”

5. Happy people surround themselves with other happy people.

happiness surrounding

    One defining characteristic of happy people is they tend to hang out with other happy people. Misery loves company, and unhappy people gravitate toward others who share their negative sentiments. If you’re struggling with a bout of sadness, depression, worry, or anger, spend more time with your happiest friends or family members. Chances are, you’ll find that their positive attitude rubs off on you.

    6. Happy people are honest with themselves and others.

    People who are happy often exhibit the virtues of honesty and trustworthiness. They would rather give you candid feedback, even when the truth hurts, and they expect the same in return. Happy people respect people who give them an honest opinion.

    7. Happy people show signs of happiness.

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    smile

      This one may sound obvious but it’s a key differentiator between happy and unhappy people. Think about your happiest friends. Chances are, the mental image you form is of them smiling, laughing, and appearing genuinely happy. On the flip side, those who aren’t happy tend to look the part. Their posture may be slouched and you may perceive a lack of confidence.

      8. Happy people are passionate.

      Another thing happy people have in common is their ability to find their passions in life and pursue those passions to the fullest. Happy people have found what they’re looking for, and they spend their time doing what they love.

      9. Happy people see challenges as opportunities.

      Folks who are happy accept challenges and use them as opportunities to learn and grow. They turn negatives into positives and make the best out of seemingly bad situations. They don’t dwell on things that are out of their control; rather, they seek solutions and creative ways of overcoming obstacles.

      10. Happy people live in the present.

      While unhappy people tend to dwell on the past and worry about the future, happy people live in the moment. They are grateful for “the now” and focus their efforts on living life to the fullest in the present. Their philosophy is:

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      There’s a reason it’s called “the present.” Because life is a gift.

      So if you’d like to bring a little more happiness into your life, think about the 10 principles above and how you can use them to make yourself better.

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