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5 Ways To Motivate Millennials With Your Smartphone

5 Ways To Motivate Millennials With Your Smartphone

We all increasingly dependent on our smartphones. They have revolutionized the way that businesses work, and we are no longer stuck to desks all day or chained to our computers. Today’s millennials almost never put down their mobiles and it’s common to see them in restaurants and cafes as a group, all staring at their phones and tablets. Millennials are a unique generation due to their vastly different attachment to their smartphones.

To many traditional managers, millennials are viewed negatively – as a laid-back, narcissistic and sometimes irksome bunch. On the positive side, millennials in the workplace are confident, have a can-do attitude about new responsibilities and seek out feedback frequently.

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In about 10 years’ time, today’s millennials will make up about 75% of the workforce. To learn how to best work with millennials, you should focus on being a coach and mentor, providing growth opportunities and social workplace connecting teams.

Technology: a crucial tool for millennial productivity

There is one trait that unifies the millennial generation – they are far more in tune with communication technology than any other generation. Being tech savvy, they carry their laptops with them, use tablets to check the news and their biggest nightmare is to leave the house without their smartphone.

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Over 80% of millennials own a smartphone and they rely heavily on them – an average millennial checks their smartphone 43 times per day.  Unsurprisingly, another survey found that 53% of 13-33 year olds claim that they “wouldn’t be able to live” without a smartphone.

This dependability on technology can be a leverage to motivate the ‘plugged-in’ generation. Instead of forcing millennials in the workplace to turn off their smartphones, you can use them as a great tool to supervise, motivate and interact with millennial employees.

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5 ways to use a smartphone to motivate millennials

  1. Connect on social networks – most of millennials spend most of their time on social media. To keep them motivated, you could create a closed social network group where employees can connect and share company news, information about projects or discuss issues and ideas freely. Providing feedback on social media is a great strategy which builds the confidence of millennials in the workplace.
  2. Getting more done through a mobile to-do list Productivity apps like Producteev, Trello or Slack are great examples – they’re simple task management applications that can be downloaded on a smartphone and used on a desktop. You can make various to-do lists by assigning different tasks within the team, adding deadlines and sending reminders. Notifications pop up on a smartphone when new tasks are given or a deadline is reached, so millennials can stay connected whilst being on the go.
  3. Enable email access – you should give the flexibility and freedom for millennials to answer emails at their leisure. They want to take ownership of the success of a project or new product launch as well as be able to answer emails on their commute or whilst waiting for a train. By giving access to company emails on their smartphones, you can give them more freedom and independence in how they manage their work. Don’t impose too many rules on millennials and give them autonomy to bring the best out of them.
  4. Work smarter and create learning opportunitiesmillennials really want to learn and develop themselves. You could use a smartphone to share interesting articles, answer their questions and mentor them.
  5. Encourage feedback – it’s extremely easy to create an online survey free of charge. When millennials are allowed to give the feedback in their own time, on smartphones, they will be more likely to respond. This can give valuable insight into the millennials’ needs and be really motivating.

Bringing it all together

Today, millennials are revolutionizing organizations and how teams should be managed. These young people are highly motivated and their high usage of mobile phone devices can be used as a tool to unlock their potential in the workplace.

Millennials love to use their smartphones. As a result, managers have to adapt their leadership style and learn the new way on how to motivate and lead millennials in the workplace.  The rise of portable devices has made interpersonal communication easier than ever before. To most people (and especially millennials) this means more flexibility, giving opportunities to work from any location.

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What’s important is that simply using the smartphone alone doesn’t make motivated and efficient team member. It’s the way how you want the Millennials to use it – that counts. As a leader, you set the policy and set the tone – keep them connected and energetic. On the other hand, making the work more fun, giving them autonomy and expanding their horizons is something that needs to be done to motivate millennials in the workplace.

Millennials in the workplace have great potential, but we need to be more flexible to unlock it. Managers who can find the right balance in utilizing the smartphones as a motivational tool will make their young and ambitious team to work smarter, not harder.

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Last Updated on November 12, 2020

15 Reasons Why You Can’t Achieve Your Goals

15 Reasons Why You Can’t Achieve Your Goals

The truth about many of our failed goals is that we haven’t achieved them because we didn’t know how to set and accomplish goals effectively, rather than having not had enough willpower, determination, or fortitude. There are strings of mistakes standing in our way of accomplished goals. Fortunately for us, we don’t have to fall victim to these mistakes for 2015. There are many common mistakes we make with setting goals, but there are also surefire ways to fix them too.

Goal Setting

1. You make your goals too vague.

Instead of having a vague goal of “going to the gym,” make your goals specific—something like, “run a mile around the indoor track each morning.”

2. You have no way of knowing where you are with your goals.

It’s hard to recognize where you are at reaching your goal if you have no way of measuring where you are with it. Instead, make your goal measurable with questions such as, “how much?” or “how many?” This way, you always know where you stand with your goals.

3. You make your goals impossible to reach.

If it’s impossible of reaching, you’re simply not going to reach for it. Sometimes, our past behavior can predict our future behavior, which means if you have no sign of changing a behavior within a week, don’t set a goal that wants to accomplish that. While you can do many things you set your mind to, it’ll be much easier if you realize your capabilities, and judge your goals from there.

4. You only list your long-term goals.

Long-term goals tend to fizzle out because we’re stuck on the larger view rather than what we need to accomplish in the here and now to get there. Instead, list out all the short-term goals involved with your long-term goal. For instance, if you want to seek a publisher for a book you’ve written, your short-term goals might involve your marketing your writing and writing for more magazines in order to accomplished your goal of publishing. By listing out the short-term goals involved with your long-term goal, you’ll focus more on doing what’s in front of you.

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5. You write your goals as negative statements.

It’s hard to reach a goal that’s worded as, “don’t fall into this stupid trap.” That’s not inspiring, and when you’re first starting out, you need inspiration to stay committed to your goal. Instead, make your goals positive statements, such as, “Be a friend who says yes more” rather than, “Stop being an idiot to your friends.”

6. You leave your goals in your head.

Don’t keep your goals stuck in your head. Write them down somewhere and keep them visible. It’s a way making your goals real and holding yourself accountable for achieving them.

Achieving Goals

7. You only focus on achieving one goal at a time, and you struggle each time.

In order to keep achieving your goals, one right after the others, you need to build the healthy habits to do so. For instance, if you want to write a book, developing a habit of writing each morning. If you want to lose weight and eventually run a marathon, develop a habit of running each morning. Focus on buildign habits, and your other goals in the future will come easier.

Studies show that it takes about 66 days on average to change or develop a habit.[1] If you focus on forming one habit every 66 days, that’ll get you closer to accomplishing your goals, and you’ll also build the capability to achieve more and more goals later on with the help of your newly formed habits.

8. You live in an environment that doesn’t support your goals.

Gary Keller and Jay Papasan in their book, The One Thing, state that environments are made up of people and places. They state that these two factors must line up to support your goals. Otherwise, they would cause friction to your goals. So make sure the people who surround you and your location both add something to your goals rather than take away from them.

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9. You get stuck on the end result with your goals.

James Clear brilliantly suggests that our focus should be on the systems we implement to reach our goals rather than the actual end result. For instance, if you’re trying to be healthier with your diet, focus more on sticking to your diet plan rather than on your desired end result. It’ll keep you more concentrated on what’s right in front of you rather than what’s up in the sky.

Keeping Motivated

10. You get discouraged with your mess-ups.

When I wake up each morning, I focus all my effort in building a small-win for myself. Why? Because we need confidence and momentum if we want to keep plowing through the obstacles of accomplishing our goals. Starting my day with small wins helps me forget what mess-ups I had yesterday, and be able to reset.

Your win can be as small as getting out of bed to writing a paragraph in your book. Whatever the case may be, highlight the victories when they come along, and don’t pay much attention to whatever mess-ups happened yesterday.

11. You downplay your wins.

When a win comes along, don’t downplay it or be too humble about it. Instead, make it a big deal. Celebrate each time you get closer to your goal with either a party or quality time doing what you love.

12. You get discouraged by all the work you have to do for your goals.

What happens when you focus on everything that’s in front of you is that you can lose sight of the big picture—what you’re actually doing this for and why you want to achieve it. By learning how to filter the big picture through your every day small goals, you’ll be able to keep your motivation for the long haul. Never let go of the big picture.

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13. You waste your downtime.

When I take a break, I usually fill my downtime with activities that further me toward my goals. For instance, I listen to podcasts about writing or entrepreneurship during my lunch times. This keeps my mind focused on the goal, and also utilizes my downtime with motivation to keep trying for my goals.

Wondering what you can do during your downtime? Here’re 20 Productive Ways to Use the Time.

14. You have no system of accountability.

If you announce your goal publicly, or promise to offer something to people, those people suddenly depend on your accomplishment. They are suddenly concerned for your goals, and help make sure you achieve them. Don’t see this as a burden. Instead, use it to fuel your hard work. Have people depend on you and you’ll be motivated to not let them down.

15. You fall victim to all your negative behaviors you’re trying to avoid with your goals.

Instead of making a “to-do” list, make a list of all the behaviors, patterns, and thinking you need to avoid if you ever want to reach your goal. For instance, you might want to chart down, “avoid Netflix” or “don’t think negatively about my capability.” By doing this, you’ll have a visible reminder of all the behavior you need to avoid in order to accomplish your goals. But make sure you balance this list out with your goals listed as positive statements.

How To Stop Failing Your Goal?

If you want to stop failing your goal and finally reach it, don’t miss these actionable tips explained by Jade in this episode of The Lifehack Show:

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Bottom Line

Overcoming our mistakes is the first step to building healthy systems for our goals. If you find one of these cogs jamming the gears to your goal-setting system, I hope you follow these solutions to keep your system healthy and able to churn out more goals.

Make this year where you finally achieve what you’ve only dreamed of.

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Featured photo credit: NORTHFOLK via unsplash.com

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