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17 Books To Read If You Want To Become A Billionaire

17 Books To Read If You Want To Become A Billionaire

Success is magnetic. As a species, we’re constantly studying how it happens, why it happens, who has achieved it for themselves, and how we can obtain it.

One thing is for sure: money is an echo of value. Those who bring great products, services, businesses, and ideas into the world are rewarded (at least somewhere along the way) with financial gain. Some of these people even become billionaires. Now, it’s not to say money is everything (it’s not), but having financial freedom certainly makes life more flexible and filled with opportunity.

For all the hubbub surrounding success, most of the attention is often swallowed up with the aesthetics of materialism. Getting a nice house, car, plenty of money to go around, and buying anything you want are still considered goals by thousands in developed countries.

In spite of this, in order to break through the typical barriers that withhold people from achieving success, there’s a ton of hard work involved. Experience, skill, grit, and emotional intelligence all contribute to success; one can be sure of this. But what’s the piece most people overlook or underestimate? Having certain knowledge others neglect.

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Here, I’ve compiled a list of 17 books to read if you want to become a billionaire. Take these one at a time and enjoy!

1. How The Scots Invented The Modern World

Billionaires point to this book because, in many ways, essential understandings of economics, free markets, and product innovation can be gleaned from it. Written by Arthur Herman, it’s a vital book for anyone seeking to understand the core of how modern economics functions.

2. Guns, Germs, And Steel: The Fates Of Human Societies

Authored by Jared Diamond, this particular book is similar to Scots, but different in the sense that it covers more details regarding societies. Guns, Germs, and Steel breaks down why certain civilizations lasted longer than others and how this was accomplished. It’s a collection of keen insights into how and why some people outsmart their environments (whether they be war-ravaged or not).

3. Influence: The Psychology Of Persuasion

An absolute classic on the power of how to get things done your way, Robert Cialdini takes persuasion to a new level here. Breaking down the six pillars of how to get people to like you and legitimately want to help you, Influence is a must-have guidebook on how to uphold the best in people while achieving your own goals.

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4. Titan: The Life Of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.

At about 800 pages long, this book is certainly not a speed-read. However, there’s no book more ideal for learning about one of history’s richest men. If you want a detailed discourse on the rising of Rockefeller, look no further than Titan. At the very least, it will reinforce some helpful success principles, and perhaps help you avoid a few mistakes of your own.

5. The Warren Buffett Portfolio: Mastering The Power Of The Focus Investment Strategy

Recommended by billionaire Charlie Munger, there’s perhaps no better book on Warren Buffett’s own investment strategy. While you can’t expect to read this book and then have perfect investing knowledge overnight, it’s indisputably an advantage over other forms of traditional education. Why not learn from arguably the most successful investor of all time?

6. Getting To Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

By Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton, this book has long been regarded as a superior business text in thousands of college classrooms and company boardrooms. Similar to How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Getting To Yes takes aim at extremely powerful negotiation techniques. Much of the book’s content includes how to talk about an issue rather than belittling a person, aiming for mutual benefit, and remaining politely persistent.

7. The Wealth And Poverty Of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich And Some So Poor

In short, this book is about why some economic pursuits succeed while others have not and will not. If you want to understand why people go after what they go after in regards to business, this is a vital read.

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8. Things Hidden Since The Foundation Of The World

In René Girard’s paradigm-shattering work, he deconstructs many of the traditionally held beliefs and systems many of us have worked through or on for centuries. Girard’s argument is that even though many individuals strive to be distinct in the world, this particular drive can have counterintuitive and occasionally undesired effects.

9. How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, And The Hidden Power Of Character

In a wonderfully refreshing read, How Children Succeed takes the reader on a journey through varying cultural and economic backgrounds. Author Paul Tough accurately points out how one’s intellect is not always tied to academic achievement, as well as similar comparisons. A fascinating and insightful read for those interested in helping and developing upcoming generations.

10. Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming The Unseen Forces That Stand In The Way Of True Inspiration

Written by creative powerhouse Ed Catmull (co-founder of Pixar), this recent book breaks down how teams of artists and creative engineers can work fluidly and get their best work done. It’s an essential guidebook for anyone who’s interested in filmmaking, music, visual art, or other artistic/creative endeavors.

11. Inside The Tornado: Strategies For Developing, Leveraging, And Surviving Hypergrowth Markets

A book adored by Steve Jobs, Inside The Tornado is an unusually helpful read on how the success of tech companies can be applied to up-and-coming startups. Author Geoffrey Moore also goes to the length of providing techniques on how to remain prosperous in spite of rapidly changing markets and consumer demands.

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12. The Intelligent Investor

One of the most highly acclaimed investing books of all time, this work by Benjamin Graham can’t be missed for those serious about profiting from investments. Read by Warren Buffett at age 19, the investing maven himself has consistently referred to it as one of his best self-education choices.

13. Good To Great

This classic business book was written in 2001 by Jim Collins, the famed company and entrepreneurship growth expert. His work examines the leadership traits necessary to take any company from just average to true greatness, reaping larger financial profit, massive employee fulfillment, and deeper cultural impacts in the process.

14. The Power Of Now

In Eckhart Tolle’s insanely popular work, the spiritual writer enables entrepreneurs even further by describing how to prevent yourself from defeating yourself. The crux of the book deals with learning how to make the absolute most of any situation you find yourself in.

15. Outliers: The Story Of Success

In what many regard as Malcolm Gladwell’s most successful work, the illustrious thinker examines the how, what, and why of various successful achievements across multiple fields. This book is an oft-returned-to discourse on the precise mechanics of how success is accomplished.

16. How To Win Friends And Influence People

There’s perhaps no more famous book on evergreen sales techniques and general principles for getting your way in life. Dale Carnegie’s time-tested, monolithic work of non-slimy persuasion hacks is filled with anecdotes and practical tips on how to master any conversation and achieve leverage within business aims.

17. Think And Grow Rich

Napoleon Hill first wrote this classic in 1937, and ever since, hundreds of thousands of entrepreneurs have pointed to it as the most important read on personal success principles. Hill’s book breaks down the psychological barriers everyone faces on the road to success, and how changing your thought patterns can directly affect your life’s trajectory.

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

How to Be Happy at Work and Find Fulfillment in Your Career

How to Be Happy at Work and Find Fulfillment in Your Career

If you’re going to spend 1/3 of our life at work, you should enjoy it, right?

Trust me, I know that’s easier said than done. Difficult coworkers, less-than-desirable tasks, or even just being in the wrong position can all lead to a lack of enjoyment and fulfillment in your work.

But what if I told you it doesn’t have to be this way? Or better yet, if you struggle with all of the above (and then some), what if I told you that enjoying your work and finding fulfillment regardless of those obstacles is possible?

Don’t believe me? I don’t blame you because I was there too. Before implementing the tips below, I struggled to get through each day, much less find real fulfillment, in the office. Now, even after the toughest days on the job, I still come away with feelings of pride, accomplishment, and fulfillment. The best news is, so can you.

If you’re ready to make those hours count and find happiness and fulfillment in the office, then read on to find out how to be happy at work and find fulfillment in your career:

1. Discover the root(s) of the problem

For this first step, we’ll need to think back to 8th-grade physics (humor me). We all know Newton’s 3rd law, “for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.” When you think about it, the same can be said outside of physics, and we see this law play out in our daily lives, day after day.

Simply put, all the issues we deal with in the office (and life in general) affect us in a noticeable way.

If you’re appreciated at work, like the work you do and receive frequent praise, promotions, or raises, then this will probably have an altogether positive effect on your life in the office.

But what if we reverse this? What if you feel under appreciated, get passed up for promotions, or get denied raises? This is sure to affect the way you feel at work on a negative level.

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So, before you can implement the steps of feeling happy and fulfilled at work, we first have to discover the reasons why you don’t feel that way already.

Think about it, write a list, or make a mental note. Run through all the reasons you’re dissatisfied in the office, and don’t hold back. Knowing the exact obstacles you’re facing will make overcoming them that much easier.

In fact, as a side-challenge to this article, I recommend picking the top three reasons contributing to your dissatisfaction at work and using the following tips to tackle them.

2. Practice gratitude for an instant uplift

Did you know the simple act of feeling grateful can increase your happiness and make you more fulfilled at work?[1]

Well, it’s true, and it’s scientifically proven.

Dr. Lisa Firestone notes that practicing gratitude “reminds us of what we lacked in the past.” Meaning, it serves as both a boost to happiness and a bit of a wake-up call that things have been or could be, much worse.

Trying to conjure up feelings of gratitude can seem almost impossible when your work situation seems bleak, but hear me out: There are incredibly easy ways to get started and it doesn’t involve trying to “force” yourself to feel grateful about things that stress you out.

For an instant pick-me-up, try this:

Find a loose piece of paper, a blank sticky note, or anything you can write on, be it physical or digital. List just three things that you are absolutely without-a-doubt thankful for in your life.

Now here’s the trick: Don’t just list what you’re grateful for, you have to list why you’re grateful for them, too.

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For example, simply saying “I’m grateful for my kids” will probably make you feel good, sure, but what if we could amplify the warm, fuzzy feeling into real, lasting motivation?

Instead, write the reason you’re so thankful for your children. Is it because they make you laugh and forget about other stressors? Or maybe they help to remind you of why you go to work every day in the first place?

Whatever your reasons may be, jot them down and keep your list somewhere you can see it while you work. A quick glance at your gratitude list throughout the day can provide powerful, positive motivation to keep going.

Bonus:

If you can find just three things to be thankful for that specifically relate to your job, and list why those things make you grateful, your list can also help you find fulfillment in your work itself which can give you an even bigger boost of positivity throughout the day.

3. Take meaningful time for yourself

We all know creating a strong work-life balance can be crucial to feeling satisfied in our jobs, but rarely do we ever address how we’re spending our time outside of work.

Many of us survive a 9-hour work day and commute home only to find ourselves busy with our personal to-do lists, running a household, and taking care of a child (or 2 or 3, and so on).

If you spend all your time working, whether in the office or within your household, you’re going to feel drained at some point. This is why setting meaningful time for yourself every day is highly important.

Look, I get it: I don’t know anyone in the working world who can shun all responsibility for a 3-movie marathon or happy hour with friends whenever they feel like it. But finding time for yourself, be it just 30 minutes to an hour, can really make a difference in how you feel at work.

This works because you’ll have time to actually relax and let the day’s stress melt away while you enjoy something just for you. The to-do lists and stressors will still be there after you’re refreshed and ready to tackle them.

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No time for me-time? Try this:

If you have a busy household, you’ll need to capitalize on a block of time you know will be completely uninterrupted. The easiest way to do this: try waking up 30 minutes to an hour earlier than usual (or push bedtime back an hour if you’re a night owl, like me) and take time to do something you enjoy.

This could be reading with a cup of tea, catching up on Facebook, spending time on a passion project—anything! As long as it’s meaningful to you, it works!

Bonus:

Starting your day with meaningful time for yourself can set you up to have a positive mood that lasts well into office hours, and having your me-time in the evening can give you something positive to look forward to during the day.

4. Get productive and feel accomplished

Don’t you just love the feeling of checking the last item off of a hefty to-do list? That’s because self-motivation can be a huge driver of positivity and success.

When we accomplish something, no matter how small, it makes us feel good, plain and simple. Applying this tactic to your daily work can be the motivator you need to find fulfillment during the daily office grind.

While there are tons of steps to get more done at work, I’ll share my personal favorite: Prioritizing.

Now, many people handle prioritizing differently. Some like to tackle the little tasks first so they can spend focused time on the big to-dos. Others like to knock out the big items first and get to the smaller ones when they can.

No matter which camp you’re in, you may be missing one crucial step: Time management.

So how’s this work? When you factor in the amount of time your priorities will take, it can transform your productivity ten-fold.

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Say you have three top priorities for the day. You might jump into the smaller ones or the bigger ones depending on your preferred method, and then find yourself out of time and bringing work home with you at the end of the day.

This is prevented when you factor in time. Knowing how long each item will take, or deliberately setting specific blocks of time for your priorities can help you accomplish more in the same 8-9 (or 12) hours that you typically spend at work.

Try this:

Take a look at your priorities and consider how long they should take. Pop into your Google calendar (or Filofax, whatever works for you) and schedule time to work on your priority items around any important meetings or events of the day.

The most important thing to remember is to stick to your dedicated time.

Often, when we know exactly how long we have to work on something (and honor this time limit), we’re motivated to get more done on time to avoid taking work home at the end of the day.

The bottom line

There’s no need to waste 1/3 of our lives feeling unsatisfied at work. Luckily, you now have the tools to get started, take back your time, and become happy and fulfilled at work again.

The only question is — which tip will you try first?

Featured photo credit: Ellyot via unsplash.com

Reference

[1]Psychology Today: The Healing Power of Gratitude

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