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7 Simple Ways To Ramp Up Productivity In Your Home Office

7 Simple Ways To Ramp Up Productivity In Your Home Office

Big businesses are rapidly realizing something that self-employed workers have known for ages: allowing employees to work remotely does great things for productivity and happiness. According to GlobalWorkplaceAnalytics.com, the percent of non-self-employed people who work from home has more than doubled over the last 10 years. What’s more, the average business saves approximately $11,000 per telecommuter annually, and nearly 70 percent of companies report increased productivity from their virtual workers.

However, the success of remote working depends a lot on the home office environment. Whether you have been working from home for years or are new to virtual employment, a positive work-from-home experience starts with a smartly assembled workspace. Here are seven easy ways to create the ultimate remote work setup.

1. Declutter

Clutter can infest your space with distractions and have a profound effect on your mood. To combat this, examine your home office and remove items that don’t belong, paying particular attention to your desktop or other work surfaces. Use of a variety of storage containers and desk accessories to keep the things you need handy but out of sight.

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Tip: If your office is tight on floor space, use a combination of shelving and wall pockets to organize your essentials.

2. Incorporate a personal touch

You spend a lot of time in your office, so creating a personal and positive space is well worth the effort. Start by establishing a cohesive home office style that you identify with, and then add inspirational décor that works with that theme. Whether you’re motivated by pet pictures, encouraging quotes, or vacation mementoes, a few carefully selected items can arouse positive vibes even on the worst of days.

Tip: For virtual work that requires a heavy dose of creativity or focus, consider changing the color scheme of your office. Different hues provide a range of psychological boosts — white is great for fostering imagination, for example, whereas blue can help promote a calm and centered mentality.

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3. Improve area lighting

Lighting is an underestimated element of a productive workspace. A dimly lit office not only increases eye fatigue, but it can also make you sleepy and negatively impact your mood. In addition to adjusting the ceiling-mounted fixtures that illuminate your office, it’s important to make use of task lights as well. These smaller lights can help ensure that your desk or other work area is sufficiently well-lit, improving both attitude and performance.

Tip: An LED dimming system is an easy and energy-efficient way to change the level of lighting in your home office as needed throughout the day.

4. Update your technology

As a virtual worker, you probably rely heavily on technology, which means keeping devices up-to-date is paramount to productivity. Whether it’s a printer you are always troubleshooting or software you have outgrown, make some time to evaluate your home office technology and upgrade tools as necessary. Plenty of new office tech products are released every year, so stay on top of recent developments to really enhance your work environment.

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Tip: You might not realize it, but a slow Internet connection may be hampering your efficiency. Test your Internet speed to find out if your connection is sufficient.

5. Elevate your computer

Hunching over a computer every day can ruin your posture and lead to an array of neck and back problems. Using a computer stand to elevate your laptop or mounting your desktop monitor to a more comfortable viewing height can help alleviate these issues. You’ll be surprised at how much more enjoyable work is when you don’t have to worry about physical strain.

Tip: Increase your comfort further by investing in a quality desk chair that provides ample support for your lower back. Or, if you want your workspace to double as a workout space, use a stability ball to help strengthen your core muscles.

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6. Play some tunes

A number of reports indicate that listening to certain types of music can boost productivity, creativity, and memory. Capitalize on this by purchasing high-quality speakers and using an app like Spotify to create playlists for different work-related jobs. Upbeat tunes are preferred for redundant tasks, and soothing music is the best choice for brainstorming and creativity.

Tip: When playing background music, stay away from songs with lyrics, as they can be distracting. Instead, listen to natural sounds, like a babbling brook or ocean waves.

7. Add plants

Adding plants to your home office will make the space feel more warm and welcoming. Potted plants also provide a natural way to help filter air and replenish oxygen — English ivy and golden pothos are two particularly excellent plant purifiers. If you don’t have a green thumb, opt for a more resilient plant, like a small cactus or succulent.

Tip: For a dose of aromatherapy, place a planter of lavender near your desk. The scent can help relieve stress and promote uplifting thoughts. Creating the perfect home work environment can be tricky, even if you’re a virtual veteran. Try a few of these simple suggestions to figure out what works best for you. In a matter of days, you could be working in a dynamic home office that catapults both your productivity and your happiness.

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Last Updated on September 22, 2020

How to Wake Up Early: 6 Things Early Risers Do

How to Wake Up Early: 6 Things Early Risers Do

You have probably heard the success stories about people who wake up early. Apple CEO Tim Cook, Oprah Winfrey, and Olympic medalist Caroline Burckle all talk about the positive impact of waking up early on their lives.

Even though many assign a portion of their success to waking up early, many find it difficult to make the switch. While most people know what needs to happen to change their life, they find then difficult to implement consistently. To understand how to wake up early, you need to tap into the wisdom of those already doing it.

Here are the 6 things early risers do:

1. Stop Procrastinating

The first thing you need to do when you want to learn how to wake up early is to go to sleep earlier. Stop procrastinating. You will find it much easier to wake up when you are getting the proper amount of sleep. Set a bedtime that allows you to get 8-hours of sleep and hold yourself accountable.

The problem most of you will have at first is how tired you will feel. If you are someone who goes to sleep after midnight, waking up by 6 a.m. will not be easy. The reason you need to push through that initial difficulty is that you are going to be very tired at the end of the day. Realistically, you probably would fall asleep at your desk or doze off on your lunch break. Either way, waking up early no matter how you feel will motivate you to go sleep at the proper time that night.

Think of it as someone who procrastinated until the night before their project was due. Having done this myself, you do what you need to do to complete the project, whether that means working all night or cutting some corners because you don’t have time to triple-check your work.

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After you turn in your project, you feel both exhaustion and jubilation. After you make it through the workday and crash at home, you promise yourself you’ll never wait until the last minute again. This same feeling will happen when you force yourself to wake up early no matter what time you went to sleep. You are going to promise yourself you will go to bed at the right time.

Most people don’t go to bed when they should because they know they will ultimately make it up in the morning.

2. Pace Yourself

If you want to start waking up a couple of hours earlier each day, you may not be able to make that change all at once. It stands to reason the more drastic the shift, the more difficult it will be.

So, instead of trying to adjust your sleep pattern by several hours, start in 15-minute or 30-minute intervals.[1] If you wake up 30 minutes earlier each week, you will be a morning person by the end of the month. This may feel like you are drawing out your goal but in reality, you are accomplishing it much quicker than most. Most people who are naturally night owls find it difficult to completely change their sleep habits overnight.

Think of it as someone who is trying to quit drinking coffee. Outside of the fact you may enjoy the taste of coffee, your body is used to operating with a certain amount of caffeine and sugar. Some will be able to quit overnight and their body will adjust accordingly. And if you are one of those people, then do what works for you.

However, if you were to take an incremental approach, then you may first start drinking your coffee black. Then, you could switch to decaf before slowly lowering the amount of coffee you drink each day. As you can see, this approach will help minimize the feeling of withdrawal while getting the results you want.

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3. Watch Your Lighting

Light reduces your body’s production of the sleep-inducing melatonin hormone. In practical terms, your body naturally wants to be awake when the sun is up and go to sleep when the sun is down. This is called your circadian rhythm.

In the technology-driven world we currently live in, you likely look at a screen or two before bed. Studies show television and phone screens trick your body into thinking the sun is up. As a result, your body starts producing less melatonin. To help you fall asleep, you should stop looking at screens at least an hour before bed.

This can also mean that if you want to wake up before the sun, looking at your screen when you wake up can help you to stay awake.

Peter Balyta, the President of Education Technology for Texas Instruments says he wakes up at 5:20 a.m. and scans his emails before starting his day. This is also true for M.I.T. president L. Rafael Rief. He wakes up around 5 or 5:30 a.m. and checks his phone for anything urgent.[2]

4. Make It Worth Your Time

Have you ever woken up early but went back to sleep because you didn’t have a reason to stay up? To put it another way, have you ever fallen asleep because you didn’t have anything better to do?

If you want to be excited about going to sleep and waking up early, then you need to give yourself a reason to be excited. You can accomplish this by listing the three things you want to accomplish the next morning. Notice I said “want” and not “need” to accomplish. You don’t want to be dragging yourself into the next morning kicking and screaming.

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Your list should not only include what you want to accomplish but also why you want to accomplish it. If you want to take it a step further, list the consequences of not waking up early.

People who have figured out how to wake up early are shown to be more successful, persistent, and proactive in their life. They tend to be happier and handle stress better. It is also shown that people who wake up early procrastinate less.[3] If you find any of these benefits something you want to add in your life, then waking up early is shown to help.

5. Avoid Binging

There is a difference between sleeping and getting a good night’s sleep. Sure, you can drink alcohol and fall asleep, but you will not be getting quality rest. You will wake up feeling as though you slept for only a couple hours.

It is best to stop drinking at least 4 hours before bedtime. Binge drinking is known to impact your sleep-inducing melatonin hormone levels for up to a week. The same holds true with eating a large meal right before bed. It is not that your body can’t process food and sleep at the same time. The main concern has more to do with the possibility of indigestion or heartburn than anything else.

If you find yourself dealing with either of these symptoms, then you may want to stop eating at least two hours before bed.

6. Get the Blood Flowing

Those who have mastered the technique of how to wake up early tend to start each morning with movement.

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Your first movement is to get out of bed. To help you get out of bed, have your alarm far enough away that you need to get up and turn it off. Before you allow yourself to contemplate going back to sleep, take a moment, and do 10 push-ups or 10 jumping jacks. Think of each exercise as you taking one step further from being able to go back to sleep.

Mellody Hobson, President of Ariel Investments wakes up at 4 a.m. each morning. She starts each day by exercising. Her exercises include running, weight lifting, swimming, and cycling.

You decide for yourself how you want to get your blood flowing. Whether you want to go on a walk, workout at the gym, or do something at home, make sure you are scheduling time to exercise.

Final Thoughts

The key to understanding how to wake up early is to recognize that it is heavily driven by the actions you take the night before. You will wake up early if you go to bed at a good time and get the proper amount of sleep.

By taking the time to prepare yourself both mentally and physically each night, you can ensure you are positioned for success the next morning. Once you have taken the proper actions the night before, make sure you use that momentum to start your day, on time.

The goal is to make the actions you want to take as easy as possible. The key to changing your life is to discover a way to have the wind at your back, going in the direction you want.

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Featured photo credit: Laura Chouette via unsplash.com

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