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Maybe You’re An Old Soul If You Can Relate To These 11 Signs

Maybe You’re An Old Soul If You Can Relate To These 11 Signs

Do you sometimes feel like you’ve lived other lives? Maybe dreams or distant memories of faraway lands and languages?

Your body remembers your past lives too, in its aches and illnesses, your mind remembers them through fears and phobias that are a response to past life painful deaths, and your soul remembers them through the wisdom and talents you’ve acquired over those lifetimes.

The more lives you’ve lived, the more experiences you’ve had, and the more lessons you’ve learned. And even though your personal experiences might be different and unique from everyone else’s, there are some common factors that older souls share.

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See if you can relate to these 11 signs:

1. You crave solitude

Are you one of those people who don’t mind being alone? In fact, prefers it? You might notice that there’s a sweetness in solitude that social people don’t understand. Although you enjoy deeper connections, you need solitude and silence to nurture you when you feel disconnected. In your solitude is where you seek connection to the universal soul, and also your deepest self.

2. You’re spiritual, but not necessarily religious

If you’re someone who doesn’t depend on religion for direction, if you’re not afraid to ask the big questions, and letting the answers come up for you, you probably can relate to the “spiritual but not religious” phrase. You seek out activities, people and books that allow you to explore those bigger questions, and not rely on religion to provide you answers. You may be more drawn toward contemplative faiths than traditional practices.

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3. You try to look at the bigger picture

You have an expanded perspective of the universe, and your place in it. You’re aware that human beings have a role to play in the energy cycle of the planet, and you participate in activities that support it, like recycling, making energy-saving choices, or planting more trees rather than taking them down.

4. You generally feel older than your age group

Have you always gravitated towards an older age group than your own, even when you were a child? Do you find it easier to have conversations with people who talk about deeper topics, like philosophy, culture, or consciousness? And do you find yourself giving advice to others in your group who come to you for help?

5. You appreciate history

Although you’re not a hoarder, you’re not so quick to toss out old things to replace them with shiny stuff. You appreciate the story in an antique, you like to learn from history, and you prefer old music and literature. You rely on your own taste, rather than follow trendsetters.

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6. You feel like you don’t fit in with the society

Older souls often find themselves misunderstood. You might have strong opinions, but they’re generally in support of connecting people, rather than creating discord – building bridges versus building walls; and this might be misconstrued as weak or meek. Because you don’t dance to the popular tune, you might feel like you don’t fit in with the general society around you.

7. You are / were sometimes teased for being “too serious”

You realize that life is important, and that your time on the planet is precious. To ensure that you take advantage of this gift, you use your time to focus on self development and spiritual pursuits, that people around you might consider too intense or too serious. They might not understand the urgency you feel within.

8. Your typical activities are introspective and intellectual

You’re generally drawn to introspective activities such as art, literature, or music, rather than aggressive sports like boxing or hunting. You tend to gravitate toward activities that take you deeper within yourself, to understand your mind and soul, as opposed to outward expressions of power and dominance.

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9. You have a deja vu feeling of “been there, done that”

Have you noticed that a lot of skills come naturally to you? You might be naturally dexterous, you might have easy aptitude for drawing or learning, or you might find that you’re quick to pick up on hidden energies. Things that many people struggle to learn might be easy for you to grasp.

10. You’re sensitive toward other helpless, vulnerable beings

Empathy is a gift you’re given as you grow older in soul age. You ache when others cry, you feel their pain when others suffer, and you reach out to those who need a hand. It comes naturally to you, and you don’t think twice about giving away your possessions when someone needs something. You’re one of those people who loves to give more than they receive.

11. You have a strong sense of purpose for your life

You have an overwhelming inner longing for meaning and purpose. You are a seeker, and you want to learn the meaning of life and to know the purpose for your being. You know deep within that you’re here on the planet for a reason and you want this journey of life to be meaningful.

If you can relate to the 11 signs above, you might be an old soul! At a time when those who talk the loudest, those who can buy their way, and those who step on others to raise themselves up seem to be getting all the attention, what the world needs is YOU – your quiet inner strength, your empathy, and your wisdom. You can change the world by being yourself, by becoming more of who you are, and by discovering your place and purpose on the planet.

Featured photo credit: Marauder via albumarium.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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