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6 Reasons Why Diet Is More Important Than Exercising For Weight Loss

6 Reasons Why Diet Is More Important Than Exercising For Weight Loss

For years now, exercise and physical exertion has been championed as the most effective vehicle for driving pronounced weight loss. While a viable exercise regime is certainly important and also capable of boosting productivity and easing stress, it is actually your diet that drives sustained weight loss.

If you are not convinced, here are the main reasons why diet is more important than exercise, along with some steps you can take to benefit from this.

1. Exercise alone cannot drive significant weight loss

Studies have proven that exercise alone cannot drive significant weight loss, primarily because the majority of us unknowingly compensate for the calories that we burn by being more physically active. Whether this is in the form of excess snacking or grab-and-go food choices, our subconscious eating habits can easily counteract the benefits of even the most strenuous daily exercise regime.

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To negate this, commit to keeping a food diary that lists every single calorie that you consume (along with the intake of sugar and saturated fat). This will make your food choices abundantly clear and highlight any areas for immediate improvement.

2. Exercise increases your appetite

We have already touched on how regular exercise can trigger subconscious eating habits, and this is based on research which suggests that physical exertion actively increases your appetite and metabolism. Such studies have confirmed that those who adhere to rigid exercise regimes also tend to increase their calorie intake simultaneously, gradually negating the impact of their workouts over time.

To avoid this, restrict your diet at the start of your weight loss drive in a bid to optimize the impact of your exercise. Remember that feeling hungry is an inevitable side effect of losing weight and changing your dietary habits, so keep this in mind at all times. Then, you should only consider increasing your calorie intake as you increase the frequency or intensity of your workouts, while also regulating your snacks and meals throughout the course of an average day.

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3. An increase in physical activity has not countered rising obesity levels

Between 2001 and 2009 in the US, the percentage of people who engaged in physical activity increased noticeably. This did not prevent the rise of obesity among US adults during the same period, however, which confirms that exercise is not enough to prevent weight gain or the onset of chronic dietary conditions.

This is a difficult challenge to circumvent, but it can be achieved by reviewing the nutritional values of every meal and snack that you consume. This will help you to regulate the amount of saturated fat and sugar that you eat on a regular basis, improving your overall health and optimizing the impact of any exercise that you undertake.

4. Food is the fuel source that drives exercise

Many people misunderstand the relationship that exists between food and exercise, but the fact remains that the former is an underlying fuel source that drives the latter. Without the right caloric intake, energy, and nutrients in your body, it is impossible to exercise effectively and achieve the weight loss that you desire.

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You can benefit from these dynamics by ensuring that you fuel your body with the right foods to optimize your energy levels. Bananas and lean white meats are both excellent sources of natural energy, for example, and their consumption can help you to achieve your fitness goals and lose weight consistently.

5. Short-term weight loss is also driven by diet

We have focused on long-term results so far, but we live in an age where technological advancements and the pace of modern life have made us increasingly impatient. This drives the need for short-term results too, but even then diet is the most influential factor in driving rapid weight loss.

Experts estimate that weight loss generally consists of 75% diet and 25% exercise, while the former also holds the key to your efforts. Analysis of more than 700 weight loss studies underlined this, revealing that the majority of people saw the most obvious short-term results through eating smart and dieting. Keep this in mind when losing weight, as you initially focus on shedding excess calories before you consider undertaking cardiovascular exercise and toning regimes.

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6. The mechanics of weight loss restrict the effectiveness of exercise

On a similar note, it is also important to note that the mechanics of weight loss restrict the effectiveness of exercise as a standalone endeavor. The American Dietetic Association confirms this, highlighting that it is almost impossible for overweight people to produce the required energy deficit of 500 to 1,000 calories per day without managing and reducing what they eat.

This is a fundamental rule of weight loss, so knowing this will save you time and help you to achieve your goals quicker. It should help to guide you when it comes to setting these goals in the first place, as you look to reduce your calorie intake responsibly and in a way that will reduce your weight both quickly and over time.

Featured photo credit: Anna Verdina / Flickr via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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