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7 Personal Philosophies You Need For Success In Life

7 Personal Philosophies You Need For Success In Life
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We all want success in life right? Whether it be success in relationships, achieving our ideal body, sporting performance, business etc. Whatever it is many of us always seem to be on this never ending path, striving for such success. But more often than not we are our own worst enemy. We often get in our own way, inhibiting our own development. Why is this? Because we haven’t developed the personal philosophies we need in order to have success in life.

This simple 7 step approach I learned from Tony Robbins will show you how:

1. Always act from personal power

What is meant by personal power? Personal power is the ability to take action. But what prevents people from taking action? The answer is obvious; fear!

The biggest fear is the fear of failure. So what we need to agree upon together, and on a personal level, is to discipline our mindset into realising that there are no failures, there are only results or outcomes. You never fail in life, you always succeed. You succeed in getting results of some sort. The key is what we do with those results.

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Think about it… How many of us always get our goals? Very few I would imagine. But how many of us always get a result or an outcome? We all do.

I have often quoted this myself but famous speakers like Zig Ziglar, Jim Rohn, Tony Robbins any many others have often said; It’s not what happens that defines you, it’s what you do with what happens…

The bottom line is, how many of us feel great about failing? But how many of us feel great about learning? So the way we can ensure that we succeed from now on is to realise that there are no failures and that you can always improve through learning from your experiences. Something I have always tried to teach my students is the word F.A.I.L actually stands for First Attempt In Learning.

2. Take responsibility for your world

Shouldn’t we all? There’s a belief in this world, that I completely resonate with, that everything that has happened to you in your life is as a direct result of your actions, either your physical actions or your mental actions. Thoughts are things. As you think so you become. This belief is The Law of Attraction.

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Perhaps you don’t hold this belief system. After all this is a very stern line, which at first is difficult to accept. But let me try to explain to you how this is so. If you’re not responsible for your world and you encounter a problem, who has the power to change it?

When you realise that you have a problem in a world that you are responsible for, you have the power, the power to change it! This belief system is not to say to you that things are your fault, but to empower you to believe that you can change your life circumstances whatever the situation.

3. Always stretch and challenge yourself

It’s essential if you want to grow as a human being that you stretch and challenge yourself on a consistent basis. Put yourself into situations that make you feel uncomfortable as it is outside of the comfort zone where the magic happens! When you put yourself on the line, you realise that you can and have to perform. Human beings can do amazing things when they put themselves on the line, they can do things that they never thought possible.

Let me ask you, how many times has a pending deadline made you work your ass off and get results? Some of us do our best kind of work under such pressure. By stretching, we develop, we achieve. And when we do, we realise that it’s not our ability that holds us back but our thinking.

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There are several keys to stretching yourself:

  • Make a commitment to yourself to do something that seems to be beyond your present ability.
  • Make a public commitment, a public declaration to someone significant in your life who can hold you to account.
  • Model someone that is already producing the result that seems to be beyond your present ability.
  • Do it! Take action, follow the steps of your model and when you don’t know what to do, act as if you do know what to do. “Well if I did know what to do then I’d do this…” This mindset takes away the limiting belief you have and allows you to get access to the resources you really have as an incredible human being.

4. Commit to unconscious competence rather than cognitive understanding

Unconscious competence is when you don’t have to understand every little detail, you just run with it and things flow. Whereas cognitive understanding is where you understand every little detail, how things work and why things happen. It’s here where we often get caught up and bogged down, limiting us from taking action.

In his book Unlimited Power, Tony Robbins put it like this; “You don’t have to study the roots of a plant to be able to pick the fruit! Pick the fruit now and get the nourishment you need!”

My point is that it’s essential you immerse yourself in action, in activity, rather than understanding every last detail.

In my opinion, experiential learning is far more powerful than studying books and lectures. I know this from personal experience. When I began my teaching career I was thrown into a class of poorly behaved, underachieving 14 year old pupils and told to teach them a topic I had just studied the morning before. I tell you now, I learned far more from that experience than I would have reading a book on teaching or sitting at the back of a lecture theater with other teacher trainees. That’s were my career began and I never looked back. I’ve since had a successful career and worked myself all the way to senior leadership.

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5. Always act from personal integrity

By integrity we mean that we act within our own belief systems. As long as you believe that they are true and make sure that you take consistent action that matches up to your belief systems, your progress will match up with your goals and you will develop they way you need to and have more personal success in life.

Another meaning of integrity is wholeness. Just think about this for a minute. If someone is not acting from personal integrity, in line with their belief systems, would you consider them to be whole? A person who is genuine? Would you be likely to go them for advice, or buy a product or service from their business?

6. The meaning of communication is the response you get

If you are not getting the result you desire, even if you’re taking action with all good intentions, what do you need to do? Change! Remember the world works through stimulus and response.

If your communications aren’t working, it’s not because your audience is wrong, it’s because your physiology, your tonality, your body language etc. triggered the wrong response. So what should you do? Change your approach! Use different words, adjust your tone, alter your body language. Communication is everything, not intention. Results mean everything.

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7. Commit to do whatever it takes to succeed

Of course with the exception of causing harm to others!

This final discipline underpins all of the above. If we wish for success in life, it’s essential we commit to making that wish become a reality. The key to success in life is to go from interest to commitment to taking action from personal power.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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