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8 TED Talks That Give You The Insights On How To Lead A Brand New Life

8 TED Talks That Give You The Insights On How To Lead A Brand New Life

The first step to recreating a better life for yourself lies in your thought process. That’s why we often rely on an enlightening TED talk to wake us up and get new ideas circulating in our heads. Each of these TED talks will help you conceptualize your life differently and make positive changes with clarity.

8. Know why you do what you do

“People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.”

This is the message author Simon Sinek provides in this talk. He explains the ins and outs of being an impactful leader, discussing how we form connections and gain trust from others. This talk redefines what it means to be a successful leader, using examples that can benefit us at work and enlighten us.

Watch it here.

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7. Vulnerability is power

Brene Brown is a researcher focused on shame and vulnerability. In this talk, she discusses how we mistake our own vulnerability as weakness, while simultaneously revering the vulnerability of others. From both a personal and professional perspective, Brown uses humor to approach this delicate topic. She outlines how we can transform shame as a society and recognize the strength in being vulnerable.

Watch it here.

6. Change obstacles into opportunities

Nick Vujicic was born to a Serbian immigrant family in Australia. A rare condition caused him to be born without arms or legs, creating significant hardships and severe depression early in his life. Vujicic’s poignant talk describes how to appreciate what you have instead of longing for what you lack.

Watch it here.

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5. Go with your gut feeling

Magnus Walker, driver and self-proclaimed urban outlaw, discusses his winding life journey in this TED talk. Following his passions, as well as his gut feelings, eventually led him to turn his dreams to reality — but it wasn’t immediate or easy. He discusses the importance of taking a leap of faith, and how passion can transform you.

Watch it here.

4. Stop sabotaging yourself

Mel Robbins is a lawyer, syndicated radio show host, and a career/relationship expert. In this talk, she cuts to the chase, giving a no-nonsense talk on why we don’t get what we want and how to stop the pattern. She discusses what it takes to push ourselves past discomfort and start doing the things we want.

Watch it here.

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3. Ask what you can do for others

Adam Leipzig is a movie producer, executive, and cofounder of the Los Angeles Theatre Center. He gives a revealing account of his Yale college reunion, where he discovered that most of his outwardly successful classmates were not actually happy in their lives. This led him to the realization that there are 5 simple questions that satisfied professionals can answer themselves — including “who do you help?”

Watch it here.

2. You are what you think

Perhaps one of the best quotes of all time, “you are what you think” has a wealth of meaning behind it. Valerie Mason-John is an award winning author and an expert on bullying. In this powerful and direct talk, she pinpoints why we’re mean to each other, and explains why mentally bullying ourselves can lead to bullying others. She lays out a plan of action detailing what we can do to slow the epidemic of bullying and treat ourselves with respect.

Watch it here.

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1. Have the guts to make a change

Most of us are familar with being fed up in our careers. Fed up with her monotonous desk job, Dianna David made a radical change to become a performer — more specifically, a movement storyteller. She describes the challenges faced during her transition, like judgement, uncertainty, financial difficulties, and a fear of being her true self.

Watch it here.

Featured photo credit: Tony Frantz via flickr.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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