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8 Insightful Questions Only The Smartest Candidates Ask In A Job Interview

8 Insightful Questions Only The Smartest Candidates Ask In A Job Interview

More stressful than Christmas shopping. More necessary than a Netflix account. The interview — to many, the most evil necessity.

For those who aren’t so inclined, the interview process feels like running against the wind — with an open parachute strapped to your back. But, for livelihood’s sake, we must be successful in interviews. Although interviews are primarily employers asking you questions and you giving your best answers, the questions that you ask can sway the interview as much as the answers that you give.

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Here are some questions to ask to help you show your interviewers that you have what it takes. Just remember that the interview is a two-way street — you are interviewing the company as much as they are interviewing you. If you join their team, it should be in a mutually beneficial relationship.

1. Why is your company a good fit for me?

This question is spunky, so know your audience well before asking. It shows that you aren’t desperate and willing to settle for any job. You refuse to undersell yourself — you have something valuable to offer and you know how much you are worth. You want to grow and develop, and interviewers love to see that.

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2. Why do you (the interviewer) like this company?

This puts them on the spot (now they can share in your pain). It also gives you the chance to learn from an insider’s perspective what is good about the company.

3. What don’t you like about this company (what is this company’s greatest flaw)?

This is another really gutsy question that should be used cautiously. I wouldn’t expect a very candid answer — most interviewers would want to remain politically correct and won’t be too honest. But, it gives you a chance to take control of the interview, and it can you show some insightful flaws in the company.

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4. Do you see yourself staying with this company for a while?

This gives you an idea of the quality of employees and the company — does this company hire “keepers,” and does it keep the good hires around? Is this a transitional job, or a good career choice?

5. What are the top three traits that your best employees have in common?

This question should give you a glimpse into what the company would expect from you, and the kind of people who would thrive there. If they mention traits other than yours, don’t necessarily take this as an ultimate red flag — no company can operate with only one specific personality type; maybe they need what you have. But, this does give you a good indication of whether or not this would be a job that is up your alley.

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6. What are the company’s highest goals for this year?

This question gives you an idea of the direction and ambition for the company. What are their goals? Are they something you can rally behind? Can you contribute to making those goals a reality? You don’t want to join a team half-heartedly. Half-hearted doesn’t stand out. Half-hearted doesn’t climb the business ladder because you aren’t fully engaged. Find a business whose goals you can get behind 110%.

7. How many employees have been brought in by other employees?

This question can give you an idea of the work environment. And the work environment is a significant factor in the quality of your work experience. Do people like it enough to bring their friends on board? If so, it’s probably a pleasant environment.

8. What would you expect from me in the first 90 days?

What better way to find out the company’s expectations, should they hire you, than to just ask directly! This shows initiative and interest in performing well. It also helps you be prepared, if you should get the job, to jump in with confidence.

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Austen Broome

Social Media/Public Relations Manager and Copywriter for Liquid Creative

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Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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