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10 Jobs That Strike The Best Work-Life Balance

10 Jobs That Strike The Best Work-Life Balance

Today’s job seeker wants to have her cake and eat it, too. There’s nothing wrong with that. I want a job that allows me the opportunity to still have a life outside the walls of an office. There’s a reason I write for a living now: I spent eight years in a box feeling the constant anxiety that if I took off any time from my job, it would all go to hell in a bucket (and it usually did!).

Sometimes maintaining a proper work-life balance is more than being able to properly prioritize one’s time between work and leisure activities. Sometimes it’s about finding a job that doesn’t stress you out so much that you spend what time you do take off from it freaking out about what awaits you when you return.

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There are myriad ways of measuring work-life balance depending the source. A job or industry with good work-life balance should have good pay, the possibility for growth, as well as giving you the chance to lead a life outside an office. Many of the best jobs with great work-life balance don’t even require an office. Others require a minimal amount of education, though they may require a greater amount of practical experience.

Others are ones that require little education and the experience can be acquired on the job. Take substitute teacher, for example. I am a former high school English teacher who spent time as a substitute teacher. Granted, I had a leg-up on other substitute teachers in the pool with my credentials, but most school districts do not require subs to have teaching certificates, let alone college degrees. I simply had to fill out an application and tick off which subjects I wanted to teach.

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In terms of work-life balance, the beauty of being a substitute teacher is that you are in charge of your schedule, the district is not. Sure, I got bumped to the top of all the lists with my experience, but I also got to tell the districts for which I taught that I could only do so on Tuesdays and Thursdays from noon to the end of the day, etc. And if I was busy the day the phone rang, all I had to do was say, “no.”

That job that I spent eight years being stressed out about? It was as a research technician, but it wasn’t as a freelancer. This job can be very different depending on the industry — I conducted research for planning and development in a mid-sized municipality. On the other hand, research technician jobs can exist in the medical field as well. In the case of real estate and development research, work-life balance would be easy to maintain as freelancing is a great option. For medical research technicians, the field is ever-expanding and innovating, so the job market is steady.

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Tech jobs are consistently on top of work-life balance lists because they offer freelancing opportunities. Many jobs in data science, software development, or web design can be done from the comfort of one’s own home. Freelance Search Engine Optimization or content managers can set their schedules, freeing up valuable time for pursuits outside the traditional “work schedule.” You may need more education or training for tech jobs than you would others, but the pay and benefits make tech jobs worth it.

Based on Glassdoor’s five-point scale of work-life balance as well as a good dose of salary data, here are 10 jobs that strike a great work-life balance, especially if you can start your own gig.  At the very least, this list will get you investigating these jobs and industries and may lead you to something with even better work-life balance:

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1. Any job in data science

2. SEO/ Content manager

3. Recruiting/ HR manager

4. Social Media Manager

5. Substitute Teacher

6. Any job in software or web design or development

7. Marketing Coordinator

8. Risk Analyst

9. Civil Engineer

10. Research Technician

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H. E. James

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Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

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  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

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