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7 Forms of Real Wealth that Everyone Should Build to Lead a Meaningful Life

7 Forms of Real Wealth that Everyone Should Build to Lead a Meaningful Life

“Some people are so poor, all they have is money.” – Patrick Meagher

Wealth is about so much more than money. Yes, money can give you opportunities, no doubt about that, but there’s so much more to a meaningful life than just making an income.

Here are 7 forms of real wealth to build to lead a rich life and build real wealth.

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1. Authenticity

It can be difficult to be completely genuine, especially when there are pressures from society to fit your personality and life into a little predetermined box. You can have a truly meaningful life when you have the bravery to truly be yourself. You are one-of-a-kind. Act like it.

2. Wholehearted Relationships

One of the best parts of life is developing strong, loving relationships with your life partner, family members, and friends. Having relationships where you can be honest and vulnerable and are loved unconditionally is one of the most awesome things to experience. Connection with others makes life amazing.

3. Courage to Find and Do the Work You Love

If you feel stuck and frustrated at work, chances are things aren’t going to magically improve for you. Think ahead and imagine your life if you stay at your current job for 10 more years. Does that make you feel excited? If so, awesome. If it makes you feel sick, start taking steps today to find work you love.

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Start becoming a self-expert. Learn everything you can about what excites you, what you can’t stand, what kind of schedule you want, and what kind of impact you want to make on the world.

Take time to find your passion – the thing that completely ignites you – and do more of it. By living passionately, you will inspire others. You will give the people around you hope and permission to also do work they love, and this ripple effect will change the world.

4. Focus

Part of living a meaningful life is focusing. Streamlining your schedule and getting rid of the unimportant junk that sucks your time is important. When you spend your time doing what you love, and get rid of meaningless activities, your life becomes more worthwhile.

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2014 study found that the average adult ages 35-49 watches more than 33 hours of TV per week. That’s almost a full-time job’s worth of TV every single week. Investing some (or all) of that time into doing something you love can drastically improve your life satisfaction.

5. A Long List of Places You Have Visited

“The world is a book, and those who don’t travel only read one page.” – Augustine of Hippo. I absolutely love to travel. It makes me feel incredibly alive. Getting to see amazing places and meet people from a wide variety of backgrounds and cultures enriches your life.

6. A Healthy Mind and Body

Having a healthy mind, free from chronic negativity and void of constant destructive thoughts, is one of the keys to a happy life. Having a healthy body is also incredibly helpful. Your body is your vehicle to carry you on all kinds of awesome adventures. We are only given one body in our lifetime. This world is a huge, amazing place to explore, and taking care of your body allows you to do many more activities.

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7. A Meaningful Legacy

Creating something that lasts beyond your lifetime is a very important life stage, according to psychoanalyst Erik Erikson’s theory of psycho-social development. There are millions of options of things you can do to leave a lasting impact on the world. Giving back to the world and building a meaningful legacy is very fulfilling. Think about what you want your footprint to be on this earth, and leave this world a better place because you were here.

Your time here is limited. Be intentional about how you’re spending your time, and who you’re spending it with. There is so much more to a good life than collecting money.

Featured photo credit: Laughing at the Beach / Craig Cochrane via flickr.com

More by this author

Dr. Kerry Petsinger

Entrepreneur, Mindset & Performance Coach, & Doctor of Physical Therapy

Feeling Stuck in Life? How to Never Get Stuck Again How to Find the Purpose of Life and Start Living a Fulfilling Life Don’t like your job? Here are some solutions. How People Make Decisions That Are Bad For Them How to Have a Successful Career and a Fulfilling Personal Life

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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