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15 Books Highly Recommended By CEOs

15 Books Highly Recommended By CEOs

Are you looking to get involved in the world of business, or take your current business to a new level? Then it always helps to hear from the experts about the best way to take things forward. With this guide, you’ll find a range of books that are more than worth your time to check out.

They come highly recommended from various business minds, and all of these books contain intricate knowledge and details that you can put to the test in your own business to improve, develop and optimize your performance everyday.

The Hard Thing about Hard Things – Ben Horowitz

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    This book is well worth checking out, as it breaks down how to deal with those tasks in business and in life that don’t come with a set formula. Prepared by investor guru Ben Horowitz, you’ll learn so much about finding answers without assistance.

    Let My People Go Surfing – Yvon Chouinard

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      LMPGS is a brilliant reach, providing you with details from the founder of Patagonia, Yvon Chouinard. It shows you an approach by this genius as he let his staff pursue their dreams and take away from the demand that they “dreamt” of being in business.

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      Business@ the Speed of Thought – Bill Gates

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        This book by Bill Gates is a must-read. It might be more than a decade old but this book provides you with the essence of making data-based decisions, helping you move out from the crowd.

        Pour your Heart into It – Howard Shultz & Dori Jones Yang

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          This book showcases how Starbucks became what it is today; a genuine global enterprise. Prepared by the chairman and CEO of Starbucks, Howard Shultz and Dori Jones Yang, you’ll get an incredibly amount of information about how this operation came to be, and its success.

          Delivering Happiness – Tony Hsieh

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            This brilliant little guide is all that you need to understand how Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh built up an incredible amount of information using startups and pragmatic thinking to change the entire landscape for himself, creating a new business ideology and loading you up with multiple useful tidbits.

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            Setting the Table – Danny Meyer

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              This book by Danny Meyer is a must-have for anyone getting into the culinary world. You’ll be able to understand how Meyer set up his own dominating restaurants and locations to deliver a specific form of service that never ceases to amaze.

              Conscious Capitalism – Jon Mackey

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                Many people are put off by the mention of the term Capitalism, but this book is well worth a read as you get key information from Whole Foods CEO John Mackey; this is a publication of his actual business manifesto, providing you with details about management amongst various other useful facts you can learn from.

                The Promise of a Pencil – Adam Braun

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                  The name alone should inspire you, and this book by Adam Braun can give you the motivation you need to realize that anyone can make a massive change, in business and in life. It’s a brilliant read with a talented man who set up one of the most powerful education non-profits that’s around.

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                  #Girlboss – Sophia Amoruso

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                    Well worth a read for entrepreneurs of both genders; it shows you how Sophia Amoruso built massive online retailer Nasty Gal. she started out selling old stuff on eBay, and went to become an example for any business mind.

                    Re-Work – Jason Fried

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                      Re-work is a great read, and provides you with the importance of finding the best details about taking on a startup business and making it work to your advantage. A New York Times Best-Seller at one stage, as well!

                      Winning – The Ultimate Business How-To Book – Jack Welch

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                        Having been the key name at General Electric for thirty years, Jack Welch is a man worth listening to. His knowledge and expertise is a vital learning tool, and will help you understand a real gurus approach to everything from managing staff to promotions.

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                        Smart People Should Build Things – Andrew Yang

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                          This brilliant book by Venture for America founder Andrew Yang should be in your basket as soon as possible; it’s a brilliant way to see how you can follow a better, clearer path to success.

                          Who: The A Method of Hiring – Geoff Smart

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                            This title is a must-read on the basis that it gives you so many key tips about hiring properly. Hint: your gut isn’t always right!

                            Nothing to Lose, Everything to Gain – Ryan Blair

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                              This book by ViSalus Sciences CEO Ryan Blair is an excellent read because it allows for everyone to see how it’s possible to succeed. At one stage, Blair was part of an LA gang yet now he’s a genuine, clean-cut multi-millionaire! A definite must-read for anyone who wants to see how the top of the tree make their money so effectively.

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                              Featured photo credit: https://c2.staticflickr.com via c2.staticflickr.com

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                              1 5 Values of an Effective Leader 2 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 3 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work) 4 30 Practical Ideas to Create Your Best Morning Routine 5 Is People Management the Right Career Path for You?

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                              Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                              The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                              The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                              No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                              Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                              Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                              A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                              Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                              In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                              From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                              A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                              For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                              This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                              The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                              That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                              Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                              The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                              Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                              But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                              The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                              The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                              A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                              For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                              But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                              If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                              For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                              These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                              For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                              How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                              Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                              Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                              Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                              My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                              Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                              I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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                              Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                              Reference

                              [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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