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A Bucket, a Dipper, and You: 5 Strategies for Managers and Supervisors

A Bucket, a Dipper, and You: 5 Strategies for Managers and Supervisors

Each person has an invisible bucket. It is either being constantly emptied or filled, depending on our interactions with others. When our bucket is full, we feel on top of the world. When it’s empty, we feel terrible.

Each of us also has an invisible dipper. We can use that dipper to fill people’s buckets by the positive things we say or do, which in turn, fills our own bucket. Sometimes we can use that dipper to dip from other people’s buckets by saying and doing things that decrease their self-worth and self-esteem, which in reality, affects how we feel about ourselves.

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How do you feel when Monday mornings roll around? Do you feel excited about your new work week, or the exact opposite? Would you rather stay home or head into the office. Much of how we feel has a lot to do with our interactions, not just at work, but on a daily basis.

In How Full is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life, authors Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton opine that our lives are shaped by our interactions with others. Whether it’s a long conversation with a trusted friend or a brief encounter with a cashier at the corner market, every interaction makes a difference. Rath and Clifton’s research shows that the results of our encounters are rarely neutral. They are almost always positive or negative. The accumulation of these interactions over a lifetime can profoundly affect our lives

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Below are five strategies outlined from Rath and Clifton’s book. When they are put into practice they will make a difference organization-wide and change the lives of managers, supervisors, and employees.

1. Prevent Bucket Dipping

Managers and supervisors regularly ask themselves if they are adding to someone’s bucket or if they are taking from it by how they speak and interact with them. Is it positive or negative? Remember, how you interact with others will determine how they will act with you. So be kind and pleasant and your employees will reciprocate.

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2. Shine a Light on What is Right

Don’t solely focus on the negative. Spend the majority of your time focusing on the power of what is right. Whatever you spend more time giving attention to is what you will get in return. If you shine a light on the positive things your employees do, they will do more of it.

3. Make Best Friends

Why is this important? According to Rath’s and Clifton’s research, people with best friends at work have better safety records, receive higher customer satisfaction scores, and increase workplace productivity. One way to make friends is to be a friend. Do for someone else, what you want done to you. Write down a list of things you can do for other people, then go do it!

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4. Give Unexpectedly

According to a recent Gallup Poll, the vast majority of people prefer gifts that are unexpected. An unexpected gift doesn’t have to be tangible. You can give by saying “please” and “thank you”. Managers and supervisors, look for opportunities to give gifts to others out of the blue. Even a smile can be an unexpected gift. When you give with no expectation to receive, it contributes to not only the other person’s happiness, but also to your overall well-being and satisfaction. The law of reciprocation says that what you give out, you will get in return, so when you give to others, other people must give back to you. This law is never wrong.

5. Reverse the Golden Rule

“Do unto others as they would have you do unto them.” This means that not all people like to receive the same things in the same way. Some people like public recognition, while others do not. Discover your employee’s preferences and intentionally recognize them in the way they like best.

Featured photo credit: Bucket and Gulls/ Jeffrey via flickr.com

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meiko patton

Founder - Never Ever Give Up

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Last Updated on June 27, 2019

12 Ways To Improve Social Skills And Make You Sociable Anytime

12 Ways To Improve Social Skills And Make You Sociable Anytime

If you feel like you’re the awkward person at social events or you struggle to enter into conversations because you’re shy, it can impact your social life and your career.

However, you can start improving your social skills by following these 12 strategies and soon, you’ll be able to enter into conversations with confidence.

1. Behave Like a Social Person

You can behave like a more social creature, even if you don’t feel like it.

Don’t allow anxiety to hold you back. Make the decision to talk to new people and to enter into conversations even when you’re feeling nervous about it.

Over time, it will get easier and you’ll quickly start improving your social skills.

2. Start Small if Necessary

If going to a party or spending time in a crowd seems overwhelming, start small.

Go into the grocery store and say, “Thank you,” to the clerk or go to a restaurant and order your food. Practice making small talk gradually.

3. Ask Open-Ended Questions

If you want the attention off you in a conversation, get familiar with open-ended questions. Encourage others to talk so you won’t have to make the idle chit-chat.

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Ask questions that require more than a yes or no answer and you may open the door to invite the other person to keep the conversation going.

Take a look at these tips on How to Be Amazingly Good at Asking Questions.

4. Encourage Others to Talk About Themselves

Most people really enjoy talking about themselves. Ask a question about a person’s career, hobbies, or family. Show you’re interested in hearing what is being said.

If you want to keep the conversation going, you should make it like playing ping pong. Learn more about it here: How to Connect With Someone Deeper Within a Short Time

5. Create Goals For Yourself

Establish some small goals for yourself. Perhaps you want to practice one particular skill or maybe you want to start attending a social activity in your community.

Establish a goal and begin to work on strategies that will improve your social life.

Even better, learn to use SMART Goal to help you communicate better.

6. Offer Compliments Generously

Compliments can be a great way to open the door to a conversation. Offer a co-worker a compliment on a presentation he gave at a meeting or compliment your neighbor on his new car.

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Compliments can show others that you are friendly and there’re more reasons Why You Should Pay a Compliment to Someone Every Day.

7. Read Books About Social Skills

There are many books on the market that can help you learn specific social skills and ways to start conversations.

However, keep in mind that reading about these skills won’t make you an expert. You’ll need to practice them over and over again.

Some books recommendations here: 20 Powerful Books to Win You Friends and Influence More People

8. Practice Good Manners

Good manners go a long way in improving social skills. Practice being polite, showing gratitude, and using good table manners.

9. Pay Attention to Your Body Language

Non-verbal communication is very important. Pay attention to the type of body language you use.

Try to appear relaxed, make appropriate amounts of eye contact, and appear open to conversation.

Learn how to properly use your body languages here: Be Instantly Irresistible With These 10 Body Language Tips

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10. Join a Social Skills Support Group

Many communities offer social skill support groups. Support groups help people who feel shy, awkward, or extremely anxious in social situations learn and practice new skills.

You’ll start improving social skills and may be able to make new friends who understand your difficulties.

11. Stay Up to Date on Current Events

Read up on current trends and news stories so you have something to talk about with people.

Try to avoid anything that is too controversial, such as politics, but do talk about other news stories that may be of interest.

It can be a great way to start a conversation and can help you stick to neutral subjects.

12. Identify and Replace Negative Thoughts

If you have a lot of negative thoughts about your social interactions, it could become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

For example, a person who thinks, “I’m really awkward and I will embarrass myself,” may sit in the corner at a party. As a result, he may leave the party thinking that he must be really awkward because no one talked to him.

Identify negative thoughts that are likely dragging you down. Replace them with more realistic thoughts such as, “I can make conversation and I can meet new people.”

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Don’t allow yourself to dwell on thoughts that aren’t productive! Find out How Not to Let Negative Thoughts Trump the Positive Vibes.

Good social skills are essential for effective communication. If you find socializing with others a challenge, start to take on my suggestions and practice each of them consistently.

Great social skills don’t come easily, you need to practice yourself and really try these tips by talking with others.

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Featured photo credit: Brooke Cagle via unsplash.com

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