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A Bucket, a Dipper, and You: 5 Strategies for Managers and Supervisors

A Bucket, a Dipper, and You: 5 Strategies for Managers and Supervisors

Each person has an invisible bucket. It is either being constantly emptied or filled, depending on our interactions with others. When our bucket is full, we feel on top of the world. When it’s empty, we feel terrible.

Each of us also has an invisible dipper. We can use that dipper to fill people’s buckets by the positive things we say or do, which in turn, fills our own bucket. Sometimes we can use that dipper to dip from other people’s buckets by saying and doing things that decrease their self-worth and self-esteem, which in reality, affects how we feel about ourselves.

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How do you feel when Monday mornings roll around? Do you feel excited about your new work week, or the exact opposite? Would you rather stay home or head into the office. Much of how we feel has a lot to do with our interactions, not just at work, but on a daily basis.

In How Full is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life, authors Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton opine that our lives are shaped by our interactions with others. Whether it’s a long conversation with a trusted friend or a brief encounter with a cashier at the corner market, every interaction makes a difference. Rath and Clifton’s research shows that the results of our encounters are rarely neutral. They are almost always positive or negative. The accumulation of these interactions over a lifetime can profoundly affect our lives

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Below are five strategies outlined from Rath and Clifton’s book. When they are put into practice they will make a difference organization-wide and change the lives of managers, supervisors, and employees.

1. Prevent Bucket Dipping

Managers and supervisors regularly ask themselves if they are adding to someone’s bucket or if they are taking from it by how they speak and interact with them. Is it positive or negative? Remember, how you interact with others will determine how they will act with you. So be kind and pleasant and your employees will reciprocate.

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2. Shine a Light on What is Right

Don’t solely focus on the negative. Spend the majority of your time focusing on the power of what is right. Whatever you spend more time giving attention to is what you will get in return. If you shine a light on the positive things your employees do, they will do more of it.

3. Make Best Friends

Why is this important? According to Rath’s and Clifton’s research, people with best friends at work have better safety records, receive higher customer satisfaction scores, and increase workplace productivity. One way to make friends is to be a friend. Do for someone else, what you want done to you. Write down a list of things you can do for other people, then go do it!

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4. Give Unexpectedly

According to a recent Gallup Poll, the vast majority of people prefer gifts that are unexpected. An unexpected gift doesn’t have to be tangible. You can give by saying “please” and “thank you”. Managers and supervisors, look for opportunities to give gifts to others out of the blue. Even a smile can be an unexpected gift. When you give with no expectation to receive, it contributes to not only the other person’s happiness, but also to your overall well-being and satisfaction. The law of reciprocation says that what you give out, you will get in return, so when you give to others, other people must give back to you. This law is never wrong.

5. Reverse the Golden Rule

“Do unto others as they would have you do unto them.” This means that not all people like to receive the same things in the same way. Some people like public recognition, while others do not. Discover your employee’s preferences and intentionally recognize them in the way they like best.

Featured photo credit: Bucket and Gulls/ Jeffrey via flickr.com

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meiko patton

Founder - Never Ever Give Up

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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