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12 Productivity Hacks For Authors

12 Productivity Hacks For Authors

Becoming a productive author takes practice and using certain habits. Today’s author faces demand to write books, create blog posts and other materials to sell books and grow their career. Use these productivity habits to get more work done each day. Let’s get started with these 11 productivity hacks for authors.

1. Set Daily Writing Goals

Writing a book may appear overwhelming at first – there are thousands of words to be written! To get over this anxiety and concern, start by setting daily writing goals. Jeff Goins, a successful blogger and author of several books, encourages aspiring authors to write 500 words every day. Entrepreneur and author Nathan Barry changed his career by writing 1,000 words per day for over 500 days.

Set a writing goal that you will keep for the next month. For the best results, use word count (rather than pages or paragraphs) since it is easier to measure.

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2. Write With Ear Plugs

Background noise is frustrating. If you work in a cubicle or open office, the noise can become overwhelming. Neville Medhora, author of This book will teach you how to write better, recommends wearing ear plugs when you need to focus and get a lot of writing done. There’s also a bonus benefit – people are less likely to distract you when you wear ear plugs.

3. Use A Mindmap to Plan Your Book

Facing a blank sheet of paper (or an blank computer screen) gives some people writer’s block. Rather than sitting there and feeling frustrated, consider using a mindmap instead. Tyler Wagner, author of Conference Crushing and founder of Authors Unite, has long used mind maps to develop ideas.

4. Read Outside Your Field

In order to study the craft and art of writing, you nee to commit to reading books. Best selling author Neil Gaiman observed that becoming a fantasy author means reading in many fields. In a BrainPickings interview, Gaiman commented, “If you like fantasy and you want to be the next Tolkien, don’t read big Tolkienesque fantasies — Tolkien didn’t read big Tolkienesque fantasies, he read books on Finnish philology. Go and read outside of your comfort zone, go and learn stuff.”

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5. Use “Distraction Free” Writing Tools

Writing on a computer makes life easier for authors in many respects. You can cut and paste text. Many common spelling errors are easily detected and corrected. Yet, computers are also full of distractions! If you are struggling to focus, consider using a specialized writing tool. Here are a few suggestions to get you started: OmmWriter, FocusWriter or Write or Die (a great tool for those who want pressure to produce!)

6. Use Writing Templates

Blogger and author Michael Hyatt frequently uses templates to write blog posts faster. You can use templates to help you write a book faster. For example, a template for a chapter in a business book might include: define the problem, present two case studies and finish with suggestions to solve the problem. You can create your own templates by studying the structure of popular books in your field.

7. Tell Stories Not Just Facts

Stories give life and excitement to your writing. Even if you are writing a non-fiction book, look for ways to include stories. For example, include case studies, tell how a person overcame a problem, or share a story from your own life. Even better – the drama of a story often makes for faster, more productive writing. Read Made To Stick for more insight on how to craft stories and make your message memorable.

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8. Carry and Use An Idea Notebook

James Altucher carries a waiter’s notepad with him every day. Why? He finds it is an easy way to quickly note down ideas as they occur to him. You may be coming home from the gym and finally get an idea – use an idea notebook to gather those ideas. Those who prefer digital tools may prefer to use Evernote. You never know when inspiration will strike!

9. Schedule A Set Writing Time Each Day

If you are writing your book and have other demands on your time (e.g. a corporate day job), consider setting a fixed schedule for writing. Author and computer science professor Cal Newport used a fixed schedule to write books, do research and stay productive. If you take a train to work, you could use your commuting time to write parts of your book.

10. Outsource Non-Writing Tasks

Creating a successful book requires more than words. The book needs a cover, layout, marketing and more. If you are struggling with all the non-writing aspects of being an author, look for a way to outsource some of those tasks. For graphic design (e.g. book covers, illustrations or logos), you can use a service like 99 designs.

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11. Write An Outline First

Writing an outline first is a great way to improve your productivity as an author. Start by writing out all of the chapter titles of your book. Next, you can write the headings for the various sections within a chapter. Spending an hour or two to create a rough outline for your book will significantly improve your productivity.

Featured photo credit: Pen and Notebook/condesign via pixabay.com

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Bruce Harpham

Bruce Harpham is a Project Management Professional and Founder and CEO of Project Management Hacks.

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Last Updated on August 6, 2020

Why Working 9 to 5 Is Outdated

Why Working 9 to 5 Is Outdated

Bristol is the most congested city in England. Whenever I have to work at the office, I ride there, like most of us do. Furthermore, I always make sure to go at off hours; otherwise, the roads are jam-packed with cars, buses, bikes, even pedestrians. Why is that? Because everyone is working a traditional 9 to 5 work day.

Where did the “9 to 5” Come From?

It all started back in 1946. The United States government implemented the 40 hour work week for all federal employees, and all companies adopted the practice afterwards. That’s 67 years with the same schedule. Let’s think about all the things that have changed in the 67 years:

  • We went to the moon, and astronauts now live in space on the ISS.

  • Computers used to take up entire rooms and took hours to make a single calculation. Now we have more powerful computers in our purses and back pockets with our smartphones.

  • Lots of employees can now telecommute to the office from hundreds, and even thousands of miles away.

In 1946 a 9-5 job made sense because we had time after 5pm for a social life, a family life. Now we’re constantly connected to other people and the office, with the Internet, email on our smartphones, and hashtags in our movies and television shows. There is no downtime anymore.

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Different Folks, Different Strokes

Enjoying your downtime is an important part of life. It recharges your batteries and lets you be more productive. Allowing people to balance life and work can provide them with much needed perspective and motivation to see the bigger picture of what they are trying to achieve.

Some people are just more productive when they’re working at their optimal time of day, after feeling well rested and personally fulfilled.  For some that can be  from 4 a.m. to 9 a.m; for others, it could be  2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

People have their own rhythms and routines. It would be great if we could sync our work schedule to match. Simply put, the imposed 8-hour work day can be a creativity and morale killer for the average person in today’s world.

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Productivity and Trust Killer

Fostering creativity among employees is not always an easy endeavor, but perhaps a good place to start is by simply not tying their tasks and goals to a fixed time period. Let them work on their to-do list at their own pace, and chances are, you’ll get the best out of your employee who feels empowered instead of babysat.

That’s not to say that you should  allow your team to run wild and do whatever they want, but restricting them to a 9 to 5 time frame can quickly demoralize people. Set parameters and deadlines, and let them work at their own creative best with the understanding that their work is crucial to the functioning of the entire team.

Margaret Heffernan, an entrepreneur who previously worked in broadcasting, noted to Inc that from her experience, “treating employees like grown-ups made it more likely that they would behave the same way.” The principle here is to have your employees work to get things done, not to just follow the hands on the clock.

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A Flexible Remote Working Policy

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer famously recalled all her remote workers, saying she wanted to improve innovation and collaboration, but was that the right decision? We’ve all said that we’re often more productive in a half day working from home than a full day working in the office, right? So why not let your employees work remotely from home?

There are definitely varying schools of thought on remote working. Some believe that innovation and collaboration can only happen in a boardroom with markers, whiteboards and post-it notes and of course, this can be true for some. But do a few great brainstorms trump a team that feels a little less stressed and a little more free?

Those who champion remote working often note that these employees are not counting the clock, worried about getting home, cooking dinner or rushing through errands post-work. No one works their 9-5 straight without breaks here and there.  Allowing some time for remote working means employees can handle some non-work related tasks and feel more accomplished throughout the day. Also, sometimes we all need to have a taste of working in our pajamas, right?

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It’ll be interesting to see how many traditional companies and industries start giving their employees more freedom with their work schedule. And how many end up rescinding their policies like Yahoo did.

What are your thoughts of the traditional 9-5 schedule and what are you doing to help foster your team’s productivity and creativity? Hit the comments and let us know.

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