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40 Inspirational Quotes From The Best World Leaders

40 Inspirational Quotes From The Best World Leaders

Leadership is more of an art or a skill rather than a science. Here are some quotes from leaders that will keep you going to becoming the person you should be.

1. “Face reality as it is, not as it was or as you wish it to be.” – Jack Welch

2. “Any woman who understands the problems of running a home will be nearer to understand the problems of running a country.” – Margaret Thatcher

3. “The nation will find it very hard to look up to the leaders who are keeping their ears to the ground.” – Sir Winston Churchill

4. “He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander.” – Aristotle

5. “The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.” – Theodore Roosevelt

6. “Men make history and not the other way around. In periods where there is no leadership, society stands still. Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.” – Harry S. Truman

7. “Focus your life solely on making a buck shows a certain poverty of ambition. It asks too little life of yourself. Because it’s only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you realize your true potential.” – Barack Obama

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8. “I began revolution with 82 men. If I had to do it again, I do it with 10 or 15 and absolute faith. It does not matter how small you are if you have faith and plan of action.” – Fidel Castro

9. “The human voice can never reach the distance that is covered by the still, small voice of conscience.” – Mahatma Gandhi

10. “If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as Michelangelo painted or Beethoven composed music or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will pause and say, “here lived a great street sweeper who did his job well”.” – Martin Luther king, JR.

11. “The value of a man should be seen in what he gives and not in what he is able to receive.” – Albert Einstein

12. “A sense of humor is part of the art of leadership, of getting along with people, of getting things done.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

13. “People buy into the leader before they buy into the vision.” – John Maxwell

14. “The art of leadership is saying no, not saying yes. It is very easy to say yes.” – Tony Blair

15. “Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.” – General George Patton

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16. “Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” – General Dwight Eisenhower

17. “It is better to lead from behind and to put others in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur. You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership.” – Nelson Mandela

18. “To do great things is difficult; but to command great things is more difficult.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

19. “Earn your leadership every day.” – Michael Jordan

20. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” – John Maxwell

21. “Effective leadership is not about making speeches or being liked; leadership is defined by results not attributes.” – Peter Drucker

22. “Big jobs usually go to the men who prove their ability to outgrow small ones.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

23. “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” – John F. Kennedy

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24. “Leadership cannot just go along to get along. Leadership must meet the moral challenge of the day.” – Jesse Jackson

25. “Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy.” – Norman Schwarzkopf

26. “Never give an order that can’t be obeyed.” – General Douglas MacArthur

27. “No man is good enough to govern another man without that other’s consent.” – Abraham Lincoln

28. “You only have to do a very few things right in your life so long as you don’t do too many things wrong.” – Warren Buffet

29. “You can’t separate peace from freedom because no one can be at peace unless he has his freedom.” – Malcolm X

30. “The nice thing about being a celebrity is that when we bore people, they think it’s their fault.” – Henry Kissinger

31. “To be prepared for war is one of the most effective means of preserving peace.” – George Washington

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32. “I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which one has overcome while trying to succeed.” – Booker T. Washington

33. “Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young. The greatest thing in life is to keep your mind young.”
– Henry Ford

34. “Never interrupt your enemy when he’s making a mistake.” – Napoleon Bonaparte

35. “In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.” – Thomas Jefferson

36. “If one is lucky, a solitary fantasy can totally transform one million realities.” – Maya Angelou

37. “If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.” – Benjamin Franklin

38. “The price of greatness is responsibility.” – Winston Churchill

39. “As we look ahead into the next century, leaders will be those who empower others.” – Bill Gates

40. “Leaders think and talk about the solutions. Followers think and talk about the problems.” – Brian Tracy

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on May 22, 2019

The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

If you spend any time at all researching life hacks, you’ve probably heard of the famous Pomodoro Technique.

Created in the 1980s by Francesco Cirillo, the Pomodoro Technique is one of the more popular time management life hacks used today. But this method isn’t for everyone, and for every person who is a passionate adherent of the system, there is another person who is critical of the results.

Is the Pomodoro Technique right for you? It’s a matter of personal preference. But if you are curious about the benefits of using the technique, this article will break down the basic information you will need to decide if this technique is worth trying out.

What is the Pomodoro Technique?

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management philosophy that aims to provide the user with maximum focus and creative freshness, thereby allowing them to complete projects faster with less mental fatigue.

The process is simple:

For every project throughout the day, you budget your time into short increments and take breaks periodically.

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You work for 25 minutes, then take break for five minutes.

Each 25-minute work period is called a “pomodoro”, named after the Italian word for tomato. Francesco Cirillo used a kitchen timer shaped like a tomato as his personal timer, and thus the method’s name.

After four “pomodoros” have passed, (100 minutes of work time with 15 minutes of break time) you then take a 15-20 minute break.

Every time you finish a pomodoro, you mark your progress with an “X”, and note the number of times you had the impulse to procrastinate or switch gears to work on another task for each 25-minute chunk of time.

How the Pomodoro Technique boosts your productivity

Frequent breaks keep your mind fresh and focused. According to the official Pomodoro website, the system is easy to use and you will see results very quickly:

“You will probably begin to notice a difference in your work or study process within a day or two. True mastery of the technique takes from seven to twenty days of constant use.”

If you have a large and varied to-do list, using the Pomodoro Technique can help you crank through projects faster by forcing you to adhere to strict timing.

Watching the timer wind down can spur you to wrap up your current task more quickly, and spreading a task over two or three pomodoros can keep you from getting frustrated.

The constant timing of your activities makes you more accountable for your tasks and minimizes the time you spend procrastinating.

You’ll grow to “respect the tomato”, and that can help you to better handle your workload.

Successful people who love it

Steven Sande of The Unofficial Apple Weblog is a fan of the system, and has compiled a great list of Apple-compatible Pomodoro tools.

Before he started using the technique, he said,

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“Sometimes I couldn’t figure out how to organize a single day in my calendar, simply because I would jump around to all sorts of projects and never get even one of them accomplished.”

Another proponent of the Pomodoro Technique is Sue Shellenbarger of the Wall Street Journal. Shellenbarger tried out this system along with several other similar methods for time management, and said,

“It eased my anxiety over the passing of time and also made me more efficient; refreshed by breaks, for example, I halved the total time required to fact-check a column.”

Any cons for the Pomodoro Technique?

Despite the number of Pomodoro-heads out there, the system isn’t without its critics. Colin T. Miller, a Yahoo! employee and blogger, tried using the Pomodoro Technique and had some issues:[1]

“Pomodoros are an all or nothing affair. Either you work for 25 minutes straight to mark your X or you don’t complete a pomodoro. Since marking that X is the measurable sign of progress, you start to shy away from engaging in an activity if it won’t result in an X. For instance…meetings get in the way of pomodoros. Say I have a meeting set for 4:30pm. It is currently 4:10pm, meaning I only have 20 minutes between now and the meeting…In these instances I tend to not start a pomodoro because I won’t have enough time to complete it anyway.”

Another critic is Mario Fusco, who argues that the Pomodoro Technique is…well…sort of ridiculous:[2]

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“Aren’t we really able to keep ourselves concentrated without a timer ticketing on our desk?… Have you ever seen a civil engineer using a timer to keep his concentration while working on his projects?… I think that, like any other serious professional, I can stay concentrated on what I am doing for hours… Bring back your timer to your kitchen and start working in a more professional and effective way.”

Conclusion

One of the best things about the Pomodoro Technique is that it’s free. Yeah, you can fork over some bills to get a tomato-shaped timer if you want… or you can use any timer program on your computer or phone. So even if you try it and hate it, you haven’t lost any cash.

The process isn’t ideal for every person, or in any line of work. But if you need a systematic way to tackle your daily to-do list, the Pomodoro Technique may fit your needs.

If you want to learn more about the Pomodoro Technique, check out this article: How to Make the Pomodoro Technique More Productive

Reference

[1] Aspirations of a Software Developer: A Month of the Pomodoro Technique
[2] InfoQ: A Critique of the Pomodoro Technique

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