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People Who Become Highly Successful In Their 20s Have These 6 Mindsets In Common

People Who Become Highly Successful In Their 20s Have These 6 Mindsets In Common
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Authority, influence, and solid income — these are labels which seem to define highly successful individuals. Achieving a higher status, fame, and abundant resources requires a certain mindset.

We have all seen or heard how certain people managed to accumulate great wealth, or simply how they became renowned individuals — but what was truly on their mind? The truth is that they had an idea on to improve something they loved, and possibly impress everyone else who shared the same interest. This brings up a different question – what is the true criteria for being highly successful? Is it having substantial revenue, or showing the world what you are good at? I believe that it is the latter, and that money and fame simply come with the territory.

The mindset must never be excluded from the equation, and as far as highly successful people are concerned, these are the mindsets they share.

1. They had a vision and made constant efforts to realize it – Mark Zuckerberg

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    We have all heard about or seen the movie The Social Network, so we have an idea about how Facebook came to be. Mark is a genius and he had a vision of an online place where people could easily socialize and stay in touch. Creating such a place was no easy task, but he knew success would bring a great deal of appreciation. He knew that it was a vision worth realizing.

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    If you are a creative visionary, and are skilled in a particular area, think hard about what you can do with your talents. Think about how to challenge and utilize them in a way that will bring a sense of achievement. Think about how you can do something which will improve the community as a whole — your efforts will not go unnoticed. Without such drive, you are reduced to only daydreaming about how to impress someone with the idea, rather than thinking about what it takes to make it a reality. It is not enough to have vision — you must also find a way to share it.

    Never allow your governing passion to rust — hone and nourish the skills you have. Learn from others and come up with something new you can share with the world. This is how you can become highly successful and admired.

    2. They allowed their suffering to drive their motivation — Elizabeth Holmes

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      Moments of great suffering and sadness make up our core memories. How we cope in these situations can reveal who we really are. For Elizabeth Holmes, it was the death of her uncle that drove her ambition to help humanity. She has come up with a device that is capable of monitoring one’s health and detecting disease before it fully develops. Now, she is one of the youngest billionaires in the world in the world, and her product can save lives.

      This kind of mindset is important not only for success, but for life in general. The truth is that life is filled with hardships, and if we can’t endure, we lose. We become deeply insecure, apathetic, and depressed. However, if we work towards regaining control, then we come out scarred but stronger. If you ever find yourself in a situation that makes you feel helpless, don’t dwell on it — focus on what you can do to make things better.

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      3. They focused on what their audience wanted — Felix Arvid Ulf Kjellberg A.K.A. PewDiePie

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        Whenever someone gives you a dirty look and tells you that you are wasting your time playing video games, tell them about PewDiePie. The gaming industry is vast, not everyone can afford to play every game. Now, you can decide whether or not a game is worth the money before you buy. This is thanks to online streaming, or “Let’s Play” videos. It has become widely popular, but one person who explored this trend and managed to earn money, simply because he liked playing video games, was PewDiePie.

        Truth be told, a lot of viewers find him immature, childish, and annoying. Still, Felix has a huge fanbase of subscribers, simply because he never failed to deliver what his initial audience wanted — insight about gaming and games in general. This kind of mindset is important for any entertainer and provider — you need to listen to the feedback of your audience in order to perfect your performance or services. Otherwise, someone else will exploit your weakness and steal your consumers, simply because you weren’t guided by the principles of good customer service.

        In other words, if you are not doing something unique and complex, then you are not irreplaceable. You need work on forming a strong relationship of loyalty with your audience. After all, this is why PewDiePie is still very popular — he stayed loyal to his initial fan base.

        4. They nourished their creativity — Jonathan Koon

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          Sometimes, being unique and original without the intention to change the world can do the trick. Jonathan Koon was just a teenager when he started nourishing his creativity for car fashion, and managed to accumulate a lot of money from it. Then, he became one of the suppliers of the show Pimp My Ride, which was a way to help out the community and gain publicity at the same time. Afterwards, he became a fashion designer, an industry he still works in today.

          Jonathan had the commodity of a young age, and was fortunate enough to discover his talent during his youth. If you are good at something, devote at least one day per week to nourishing that creativity. This kind of mindset is important if you intend to become highly successful one day. It is true that we might not always have the time to practice what we are good at, but probably possible to find some free time during the weekend. This allows us to feel truly productive, filling us with positive energy. Without this kind of devotion, there is a risk that you will feel trapped and unfulfilled. After all, our hobbies are part of who we are — our own spark of individuality.

          5. They never lost hope, instead working hard and remaining patient — Bruce Lee

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            “Highly successful” does not always imply wealth — very often it simply means being the best at something, and in this case it is martial arts. Bruce Lee is the undisputed champion when it comes to fighting techniques, and no matter how you look at it, this is sheer success. He showed the world the potential of the human body. One of his most memorable quotes was “Do not pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one.”

            The truth is, hard work and determination will get you through the most difficult times in your life. Struggles teach us to be resourceful and find a way out of a difficult situation. If you are going through a financial crisis, there is always a way to manage your finances — you can try doing something as a freelancer on numerous online platforms, you can do surveys online and get some money, you can give English lessons via Skype, among many other options. These are not permanent solutions, but they can help you manage.

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            The ability to efficiently cope during hard times is essential for highly successful people. It shows them what options are available, it helps when constructing contingency plans and exit strategies. Such a mindset will result in greater confidence and a sense of security. Without it, you’ll be constantly overwhelmed with the fear of losing your assets, which always results in health issues.

            6. They challenged the popular beliefs and pushed the limits – Steve Jobs

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              When we are talking about highly successful people who made crucial decisions at a young age, Steve Jobs is an inevitable mention. He, Mark Zuckerberg, and Elizabeth Holmes exemplify the American Dream — just like the very inventor of the concept, Benjamin Franklin. The problem is that these situations make one into a role model, and idealizing others can have a negative impact on your mind. It is not uncommon to try mimicking the behavior of your paragons, thinking that it will somehow get you closer to their mindset. With that being said, it is quite clear that forsaking school and education is not a part of the mindset, it simply happened because Steve Jobs wanted to pursue his well-established vision.

              When you decide to challenge established norms and try to go against the curve, make sure you have a well-supported plan. Deciding to become a drop-out and waiting for brilliance and fame to appear miraculously is a flawed belief. Think every major decision through. Weigh the pros and cons before you make major decisions — after all, recklessness is not a virtue. However, it is also important to mention that hesitation can result in regrets, so always strive to find a balance between the two.

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              Djordje Todorovic

              Blogger, Gamer Extraordinaire

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              1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 3 5 Values of an Effective Leader 4 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 5 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

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              Last Updated on July 21, 2021

              The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

              The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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              No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

              Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

              Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

              A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

              Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

              In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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              From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

              A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

              For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

              This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

              The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

              That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

              Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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              The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

              Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

              But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

              The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

              The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

              A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

              For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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              But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

              If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

              For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

              These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

              For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

              How to Make a Reminder Works for You

              Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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              Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

              Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

              My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

              Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

              I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

              More on Building Habits

              Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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              Reference

              [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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