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10 Free Online Courses To Make You More Successful

10 Free Online Courses To Make You More Successful
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Success is not an act; it is a slow process that involves growth, change and failure. It involves all aspects of your life, from how you manage your credit card bills to how to discipline your children. Here is a selection of free courses that cover all aspects of your life that you need to control in order to be successful. This list has all you need to know to be successful on a whole new level.

1. Work Smarter, Not Harder: Time Management for Personal & Professional Productivity

https://www.coursera.org/learn/work-smarter-not-harder

4-8 hours of videos, readings, and quizzes

Lots of people say that time is your most valuable resource. With this course at UC Irvine, you can learn how to use your time to make yourself more successful. This course covers personal and professional productivity, which is useful because a poor personal routine can undermine your efforts to be successful. Learn how to use your time more productively to reach a new level of success.Stick with this course to learn more about being a more productive person. 

2. Successful Negotiation: Essential Strategies and Skills

https://www.coursera.org/learn/negotiation-skills

8.5 hours of videos

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Learn how to negotiate with a course from the University of Michigan. It teaches you how to work a negotiation to ensure you get the better deal. You will benefit from the tips, tricks and advice that have been gathered from studies into human behavior. It can help make you successful through teaching you how to negotiate your way into a better wage, mortgage, and into a better job. They work on the four steps to successful negotiation.

3. Love Your Money

http://loveyourmoney.org/

Ongoing

In a joint venture with the University of Tennessee and FINRA, you can figure out how to achieve all the success you want by managing your money better. The course teaches you how to be successful with things such as building wealth, setting budgets, setting goals, debt, pensions and so much more. It runs through many of the money issues you are going to face throughout your life and teaches you how to handle them to ensure your future success. Take this course to improve the way you use your money throughout the rest of your lifetime. 

4. Effective Altruism

https://www.coursera.org/learn/altruism

10-15 hours of videos and assignments

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With Princeton University you can learn how give away your money more effectively. Sometimes you can do damage with the money you give away if you don’t check out the background of the organization you are giving to. In addition, many people squander there money on risky ventures with family and friends. This course teaches you how to avoid such traps and make practical and unsentimental decisions giving away money.Throughout a lifetime of giving, you deserve to know that the organizations you are giving to are ones that represent your values. 

5. Psychology of Popularity

https://www.coursera.org/course/popularity

6 weeks of study at 1-2 hours per week

The key to success is often the ability to influence people, and with the University of North Carolina, you can learn how popularity works. You can discover the psychology behind popularity and how to use it. They feature the works of Steve Siebold, a famous public speaker, and with the help of the course, you may find how to capitalize on the predictable nature of popularity. While this type of popularity is different than the type worshiped in high school, popularity can be quite effective in your professional and personal life in making connections that are genuine. 

6. Behavioral Economics in Action

https://www.edx.org/course/behavioural-economics-action-university-torontox-be101x

6 weeks with 4 – 5 hours per week

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This is a course from the University of Toronto. The class gives practical ways to change how you behave in every aspect of life. For example, people in our time have been taught by the TV and media to spend money as soon as they get it. This is a behavior that you can change. The course gives you practical advice that you can use to change how you are programmed with regards to money and temptation. Master your mind, and you are one-step closer to success.

7. Personal & Family Financial Planning

https://www.coursera.org/course/uffinancialplanning

8 weeks of study for 5-7 hours per week

Success means being able to balance and manage your home life as well as your career. With the University of Florida, you can learn how to balance your home and work life and you can learn how to plan for a career. You no longer need to choose between having a family and having a career, with the help of this course you can have both. You can learn how to manage risk, work on your taxes and invest so that you have the money to fund your new family.

8. The Language and Tools of Financial Analysis

https://www.coursera.org/course/financialanalysis

4 weeks at 6 hours per week

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With the University of Melbourne, you can learn how investors, analysts and CEOs make their decisions. It teaches you computer skills along with financial decision-making skills. Learn basic accounting principles and combine it all to figure out how to manage and use your money more effectively. You can measure the value of your investments and figure out where to put your money where it will work its hardest for you. It is a core lesson in the productivity of the money you invest. If you start today, your investments will pay off in the long-run. 

9. Financial Markets

https://www.coursera.org/course/financialmarkets

8 weeks of study at 6-12 hours per week

With this course at Yale University, you can learn how the world markets work via guest speakers such as Hank Greenberg and Carl Icahn. You can learn the theory behind banking and the financial markets. They tie into everything from the rate you pay for your mortgage, to how much stock you should buy for the coming month. With this knowledge, you can make more informed decisions at home and in business. They even help you guess how the financial markets are going to change in the future.

10. Financial Evaluation and Strategy: Investments

https://www.coursera.org/course/investments

4 weeks of study at 4-6 hours per week

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This is a very useful course you can take with the University of Illinois. It teaches key principles such as risk and return, optimization, and security pricing. It works well when trying to figure out your future investments, but it ties into hundreds of different aspects of your life, from how you make decisions about staff members to how you discipline your children. Learn how to look to the future and how you should invest in your own success and what risks you should take.

Featured photo credit: Gabriela Pinto / Project 365 via flickr.com

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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