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14 Untranslatable Words Shown In Incredibly Stunning Illustrations

14 Untranslatable Words Shown In Incredibly Stunning Illustrations

The languages of the world are a beautiful thing. Although most objects have direct translations into all different languages, many ideas and concepts are unique to the culture in which the language exists. Because of this, a word used frequently in one language might be completely alien to another, and require a sentence-long explanation. Thankfully, artist Marija Tiurina has created these illustrations to explain some of the strangest culture-specific words in the world:

1. Palegg, Norwegian for “anything you can put on a slice of bread”

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    I’m not saying you should put any and everything on a slice of bread, but I’m not not saying that, either. (Disclaimer: Please only put edible things on your slices of bread.)

    2. Duende, Spanish for “the mysterious power a work of art has on a person”

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      Remember that scene in Ferris Beuller’s Day Off when Cameron became transfixed with George Seurat’s “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte”? That.

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      3. Baku-shan, Japanese for “a girl that looks beautiful when viewed from behind”

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        I disagree here. There’s definitely an English translation for this. You just have to check Urban Dictionary to find it. (And no, I’m not going to tell you what it is)

        4. L’appel Duvide, French for “the instinctive urge to jump from a high place”

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          Does anyone really suffer from this? I mean, I guess if they do, they don’t for long. Sorry, I guess that was a bit insensitive.

          5. Tingo, Pascuense for “taking objects of desire from a friend’s house over a period of time by borrowing and not returning them”

          cute-illustrations-untranslatable-words-marija-tiurina-7

            “Hey neighbor, did I lend you my shovel?” “Oh, yeah a few weeks ago. It’s in my tool shed next to your lawn mower, your rake, and your step ladder.”

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            6. Schadenfreude, German for “feeling pleasure from other’s pain or misfortune”

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              Of all the words on this list, you’ve probably heard this one before. I know we’re supposed to be kind to everyone, turn the other cheek and all that…but when karma takes over and someone gets what’s coming to them, sometimes you just have to sit back and enjoy the show.

              7. Kyoikumama, Japanese for “a mother who relentlessly pushes her children toward academic achievement”

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                All joking aside, the rate of suicide for young men in Japan is astronomical because of the pressure they face to do well in school.

                8. Schlimazl, Yiddish for “a chronically unlucky person”

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                  Being a bit of a schlimazl myself, I have to take extra precautions when leaving the house, driving to the store, taking a shower…you name it, I’ve probably hurt myself doing it.

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                  9. Age-otori, Japanese for “to look worse after a haircut”

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                    Who here hasn’t gotten a bad haircut at least once in their life? Don’t worry, it grows back.

                    10. Luftmensch, Yiddish for “air person,” meaning “someone who is a bit of a dreamer”

                    cute-illustrations-untranslatable-words-marija-tiurina

                      Get your head out of the clouds and come back to Earth. There’s work to do!

                      11. Tretar, Swedish for “a second refill of a cup of coffee”

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                        Just order a venti and you won’t have to keep asking for more.

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                        12. Gufra, Arabic for “the amount of water that can be held in cupped hands”

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                          Also the sound you make when you accidentally inhale water while splashing your face in the morning.

                          13. Cafuné, Brazilian Portuguese for “to run your fingers through someone’s hair tenderly”

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                            I love when my wife cafunés me. Sorry, that sounds a bit dirty.

                            14. Torschlusspanik, German for “the fear of diminishing opportunities as one ages”

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                              “There are so many things I haven’t done!” Sounds like a mid-life crisis to me. Except it’s more focused on abilities and skills than, you know, sports cars and pretty women.

                              Featured photo credit: Marija Tiurina via facebook.com

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                              Last Updated on November 15, 2018

                              Success In Reaching Goals Is Determined By Mindset

                              Success In Reaching Goals Is Determined By Mindset

                              What do you think it takes to achieve your goals? Hard work? Lots of actions? While these are paramount to becoming successful in reaching our goals, neither of these are possible without a positive mindset.

                              As humans, we naturally tend to lean towards a negative outlook when it comes to our hopes and dreams. We are prone to believing that we have limitations either from within ourselves or from external forces keeping us from truly getting to where we want to be in life. Our tendency to think that we’ll “believe it when we see it” suggests that our mindsets are focused on our goals not really being attainable until they’ve been achieved. The problem with this is that this common mindset fuels our limiting beliefs and shows a lack of faith in ourselves.

                              The Success Mindset

                              Success in achieving our goals comes down to a ‘success mindset’. Successful mindsets are those focused on victory, based on positive mental attitudes, empowering inclinations and good habits. Acquiring a success mindset is the sure-fire way to dramatically increase your chance to achieve your goals.

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                              The idea that achieving our goals comes down to our habits and actions is actually a typical type of mindset that misses a crucial point; that our mindset is, in fact, the determiner of our energy and what actions we take. A negative mindset will tend to create negative actions and similarly if we have a mindset that will only set into action once we see ‘proof’ that our goals are achievable, then the road will be much longer and arduous. This is why, instead of thinking “I’ll believe it when I see it”, a success mindset will think “I’ll see it when I believe it.”

                              The Placebo Effect and What It Shows Us About The Power of Mindset

                              The placebo effect is a perfect example of how mindset really can be powerful. In scientific trials, a group of participants were told they received medication that will heal an ailment but were actually given a sugar pill that does nothing (the placebo). Yet after the trial the participants believed it’s had a positive effect – sometimes even cured their ailment even though nothing has changed. This is the power of mindset.

                              How do we apply this to our goals? Well, when we set goals and dreams how often do we really believe they’ll come to fruition? Have absolute faith that they can be achieved? Have a complete unwavering expectation? Most of us don’t because we hold on to negative mindsets and limiting beliefs about ourselves that stop us from fully believing we are capable or that it’s at all possible. We tend to listen to the opinions of others despite them misaligning with our own or bow to societal pressures that make us believe we should think and act a certain way. There are many reasons why we possess these types of mindsets but a success mindset can be achieved.

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                              How To Create a Success Mindset

                              People with success mindsets have a particular way of perceiving things. They have positive outlooks and are able to put faith fully in their ability to succeed. With that in mind, here are a few ways that can turn a negative mindset into a successful one.

                              1. A Success Mindset Comes From a Growth Mindset

                              How does a mindset even manifest itself? It comes from the way you talk to yourself in the privacy of your own head. Realising this will go a long way towards noticing how you speak to yourself and others around you. If it’s mainly negative language you use when you talk about your goals and aspirations then this is an example of a fixed mindset.

                              A negative mindset brings with it a huge number of limiting beliefs. It creates a fixed mindset – one that can’t see beyond it’s own limitations. A growth mindset sees these limitations and looks beyond them – it finds ways to overcome obstacles and believes that this will result in success. When you think of your goal, a fixed mindset may think “what if I fail?” A growth mindset would look at the same goal and think “failures happen but that doesn’t mean I won’t be successful.”

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                              There’s a lot of power in changing your perspective.

                              2. Look For The Successes

                              It’s really important to get your mind focused on positive aspects of your goal. Finding inspiration through others can be really uplifting and keep you on track with developing your success mindset; reinforcing your belief that your dreams can be achieved. Find people that you can talk with about how they achieved their goals and seek out and surround yourself with positive people. This is crucial if you’re learning to develop a positive mindset.

                              3. Eliminate Negativity

                              You can come up against a lot of negativity sometimes either through other people or within yourself. Understanding that other people’s negative opinions are created through their own fears and limiting beliefs will go a long way in sustaining your success mindset. But for a lot of us, negative chatter can come from within and these usually manifest as negative words such as can’t, won’t, shouldn’t. Sometimes, when we think of how we’re going to achieve our goals, statements in our minds come out as negative absolutes: ‘It never works out for me’ or ‘I always fail.’

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                              When you notice these coming up you need to turn them around with ‘It always works out for me!’ and ‘I never fail!’ The trick is to believe it no matter what’s happened in the past. Remember that every new day is a clean slate and for you to adjust your mindset.

                              4. Create a Vision

                              Envisioning your end goal and seeing it in your mind is an important trait of a success mindset. Allowing ourselves to imagine our success creates a powerful excitement that shouldn’t be underestimated. When our brain becomes excited at the thought of achieving our goals, we become more committed, work harder towards achieving it and more likely to do whatever it takes to make it happen.

                              If this involves creating a vision board that you can look at to remind yourself every day then go for it. Small techniques like this go a long way in sustaining your success mindset and shouldn’t be dismissed.

                              An Inspirational Story…

                              For centuries experts said that running a mile in under 4 minutes was humanly impossible. On the 6th May 1954, Rodger Bannister did just that. As part of his training, Bannister relentlessly visualised the achievement, believing he could accomplish what everyone said wasn’t possible…and he did it.

                              What’s more amazing is that, as soon as Bannister achieved the 4-minute mile, more and more people also achieved it. How was this possible after so many years of no one achieving it? Because in people’s minds it was suddenly possible – once people knew that it was achievable it created a mindset of success and now, after over fifty years since Bannister did the ‘impossible’, his record has been lowered by 17 seconds – the power of the success mindset!

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