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14 Untranslatable Words Shown In Incredibly Stunning Illustrations

14 Untranslatable Words Shown In Incredibly Stunning Illustrations

The languages of the world are a beautiful thing. Although most objects have direct translations into all different languages, many ideas and concepts are unique to the culture in which the language exists. Because of this, a word used frequently in one language might be completely alien to another, and require a sentence-long explanation. Thankfully, artist Marija Tiurina has created these illustrations to explain some of the strangest culture-specific words in the world:

1. Palegg, Norwegian for “anything you can put on a slice of bread”

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    I’m not saying you should put any and everything on a slice of bread, but I’m not not saying that, either. (Disclaimer: Please only put edible things on your slices of bread.)

    2. Duende, Spanish for “the mysterious power a work of art has on a person”

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      Remember that scene in Ferris Beuller’s Day Off when Cameron became transfixed with George Seurat’s “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte”? That.

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      3. Baku-shan, Japanese for “a girl that looks beautiful when viewed from behind”

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        I disagree here. There’s definitely an English translation for this. You just have to check Urban Dictionary to find it. (And no, I’m not going to tell you what it is)

        4. L’appel Duvide, French for “the instinctive urge to jump from a high place”

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          Does anyone really suffer from this? I mean, I guess if they do, they don’t for long. Sorry, I guess that was a bit insensitive.

          5. Tingo, Pascuense for “taking objects of desire from a friend’s house over a period of time by borrowing and not returning them”

          cute-illustrations-untranslatable-words-marija-tiurina-7

            “Hey neighbor, did I lend you my shovel?” “Oh, yeah a few weeks ago. It’s in my tool shed next to your lawn mower, your rake, and your step ladder.”

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            6. Schadenfreude, German for “feeling pleasure from other’s pain or misfortune”

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              Of all the words on this list, you’ve probably heard this one before. I know we’re supposed to be kind to everyone, turn the other cheek and all that…but when karma takes over and someone gets what’s coming to them, sometimes you just have to sit back and enjoy the show.

              7. Kyoikumama, Japanese for “a mother who relentlessly pushes her children toward academic achievement”

              cute-illustrations-untranslatable-words-marija-tiurina-5

                All joking aside, the rate of suicide for young men in Japan is astronomical because of the pressure they face to do well in school.

                8. Schlimazl, Yiddish for “a chronically unlucky person”

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                  Being a bit of a schlimazl myself, I have to take extra precautions when leaving the house, driving to the store, taking a shower…you name it, I’ve probably hurt myself doing it.

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                  9. Age-otori, Japanese for “to look worse after a haircut”

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                    Who here hasn’t gotten a bad haircut at least once in their life? Don’t worry, it grows back.

                    10. Luftmensch, Yiddish for “air person,” meaning “someone who is a bit of a dreamer”

                    cute-illustrations-untranslatable-words-marija-tiurina

                      Get your head out of the clouds and come back to Earth. There’s work to do!

                      11. Tretar, Swedish for “a second refill of a cup of coffee”

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                        Just order a venti and you won’t have to keep asking for more.

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                        12. Gufra, Arabic for “the amount of water that can be held in cupped hands”

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                          Also the sound you make when you accidentally inhale water while splashing your face in the morning.

                          13. Cafuné, Brazilian Portuguese for “to run your fingers through someone’s hair tenderly”

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                            I love when my wife cafunés me. Sorry, that sounds a bit dirty.

                            14. Torschlusspanik, German for “the fear of diminishing opportunities as one ages”

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                              “There are so many things I haven’t done!” Sounds like a mid-life crisis to me. Except it’s more focused on abilities and skills than, you know, sports cars and pretty women.

                              Featured photo credit: Marija Tiurina via facebook.com

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                              Last Updated on January 18, 2019

                              7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

                              7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

                              Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

                              But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

                              If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

                              1. Limit the time you spend with them.

                              First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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                              In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

                              Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

                              2. Speak up for yourself.

                              Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

                              3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

                              This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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                              But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

                              4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

                              Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

                              This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

                              Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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                              5. Change the subject.

                              When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

                              Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

                              6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

                              Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

                              I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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                              You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

                              Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

                              7. Leave them behind.

                              Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

                              If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

                              That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

                              You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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