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10 Reasons People Who Enjoy Their “Me” Time Are More Likely To Be Successful

10 Reasons People Who Enjoy Their “Me” Time Are More Likely To Be Successful

People who enjoy their me time know something we don’t. Introverts have significant advantage over the rest of us who like to shoot at the hip. It’s time to call them out for the all-stars they truly are. The contemplative nature of reserved types aren’t preoccupied with what the next moment holds. They are firmly placed in the present and experience a much richer life because of it.

Looking out for oneself has a bad rap these days. “How can you be so selfish?” An accusatory statement we use to jab at our significant other or friends for focusing more on themselves than us. But what if this is their trick to winning at life? Let your “me” flag fly and check this out.

1. They Enjoy Deeper Connections

Results from a study at the University of Michigan showed marriages where partners took their “me” time to be a significant factor of happiness. Believe it or not a faltering sex life was less of a cause for failed relationships than each partner having their opportunity to cultivate their own interests (MBG). Emotional availability is improved when they spend time routinely exploring their own mind. After all, they are fascinating people.

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2. They Never Leave The House With A Low Battery

Psychologists advocate our use of alone time in order to give our brains the reboot it needs. They are aware of how full their mind battery is at any given time which gives them access to deep thinking, concentration, productivity and problem solving. Not only that they are happier because of it. Sometimes it’s okay to step on the brakes and they know better than anyone (Happify).

3. They Know Calendars Are Their Best Friend

Schedule, schedule, schedule. Without this secret ingredient the “me” time never happens. Quality time for themselves is the most important over quantity and a British study supports this claim (MBG). By making head space for the “me” activity it leads to a greater wellbeing, better work engagement and an improved work-life balance. In todays world of always on electronics that is a breath of fresh air.

4. They Have Self Confidence

Saying “no” is something they have no problem doing because they spend time learning about what it is that truly makes them happy. When we spend time pleasing others it is easy to lose touch with what we want out of life. They are believers in the phrase, “Life is short, so live it.”

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5. Their Brains Are More Advanced

Naturally all of this quality “me” time leads to good decisions on what activities to engage in. They invest in good books, learning how to play a musical instrument or group sports. Part of what makes them so powerful as people is that they realize their time doesn’t always have to be spent alone. Human happiness comes from being social with others and grows our brains as a result.

6. They Are Way More Creative

When we are zoomed in on a problem it is hard to see the big picture. “Me” timers are apt to have free space in their minds for possibilities. The creative process is not one to rush and the introverted mind is superb at finding answers to questions most of us, including myself, cannot hack.

7. They Rise 30 Minutes Earlier

Getting up in the morning doesn’t have to be an ordeal for them. They know that even a small head start on the day gets the brain juices flowing earlier and makes room for them to express gratitude through a journal, read a book or start on the news. No matter how busy their schedule is they always seem to get more done than anyone else. Don’t be jealous, try it.

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8. They Close Their Door

The office or home environment can get chaotic at times. Alerting others to their focus on a project or creative process will allow the space they need to excel. Ditch the guilt of spending time away from the social bustle to prevent burn out. It makes them better friends, parents, partners and team members.

9. They Don’t Have Trouble Concentrating

Spending more time in the moment is easy when they look out for themselves. On average men enjoy 28 hours of leisure time where women only get around 25 hours. They realize that this time should be spent on high quality activities that they enjoy. When it’s time to get back to work it’s not difficult for them to focus in on what they need to get done because of how centered they are.

10. They Experience Less Guilt

According to research 29% of spouses say they don’t have enough privacy or time for themselves in the relationship. They aren’t afraid to express their feelings about what their status is with those they connect with enabling a new depth to relationships. It’s not uncommon for them to share exciting news like, “I decided I’m going to learn how to play piano!” The positive impact on others from their self confidence gives them a guilt free lifestyle, opening access to a world of “me” (MBG).

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Are you one of these rare people that enjoy their “me” time? Has it effected your life in a beneficial way? Comment below and share your experiences.

Featured photo credit: Ed Gregory via snap-photos.s3.amazonaws.com

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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