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10 Reasons People Who Enjoy Their “Me” Time Are More Likely To Be Successful

10 Reasons People Who Enjoy Their “Me” Time Are More Likely To Be Successful
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People who enjoy their me time know something we don’t. Introverts have significant advantage over the rest of us who like to shoot at the hip. It’s time to call them out for the all-stars they truly are. The contemplative nature of reserved types aren’t preoccupied with what the next moment holds. They are firmly placed in the present and experience a much richer life because of it.

Looking out for oneself has a bad rap these days. “How can you be so selfish?” An accusatory statement we use to jab at our significant other or friends for focusing more on themselves than us. But what if this is their trick to winning at life? Let your “me” flag fly and check this out.

1. They Enjoy Deeper Connections

Results from a study at the University of Michigan showed marriages where partners took their “me” time to be a significant factor of happiness. Believe it or not a faltering sex life was less of a cause for failed relationships than each partner having their opportunity to cultivate their own interests (MBG). Emotional availability is improved when they spend time routinely exploring their own mind. After all, they are fascinating people.

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2. They Never Leave The House With A Low Battery

Psychologists advocate our use of alone time in order to give our brains the reboot it needs. They are aware of how full their mind battery is at any given time which gives them access to deep thinking, concentration, productivity and problem solving. Not only that they are happier because of it. Sometimes it’s okay to step on the brakes and they know better than anyone (Happify).

3. They Know Calendars Are Their Best Friend

Schedule, schedule, schedule. Without this secret ingredient the “me” time never happens. Quality time for themselves is the most important over quantity and a British study supports this claim (MBG). By making head space for the “me” activity it leads to a greater wellbeing, better work engagement and an improved work-life balance. In todays world of always on electronics that is a breath of fresh air.

4. They Have Self Confidence

Saying “no” is something they have no problem doing because they spend time learning about what it is that truly makes them happy. When we spend time pleasing others it is easy to lose touch with what we want out of life. They are believers in the phrase, “Life is short, so live it.”

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5. Their Brains Are More Advanced

Naturally all of this quality “me” time leads to good decisions on what activities to engage in. They invest in good books, learning how to play a musical instrument or group sports. Part of what makes them so powerful as people is that they realize their time doesn’t always have to be spent alone. Human happiness comes from being social with others and grows our brains as a result.

6. They Are Way More Creative

When we are zoomed in on a problem it is hard to see the big picture. “Me” timers are apt to have free space in their minds for possibilities. The creative process is not one to rush and the introverted mind is superb at finding answers to questions most of us, including myself, cannot hack.

7. They Rise 30 Minutes Earlier

Getting up in the morning doesn’t have to be an ordeal for them. They know that even a small head start on the day gets the brain juices flowing earlier and makes room for them to express gratitude through a journal, read a book or start on the news. No matter how busy their schedule is they always seem to get more done than anyone else. Don’t be jealous, try it.

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8. They Close Their Door

The office or home environment can get chaotic at times. Alerting others to their focus on a project or creative process will allow the space they need to excel. Ditch the guilt of spending time away from the social bustle to prevent burn out. It makes them better friends, parents, partners and team members.

9. They Don’t Have Trouble Concentrating

Spending more time in the moment is easy when they look out for themselves. On average men enjoy 28 hours of leisure time where women only get around 25 hours. They realize that this time should be spent on high quality activities that they enjoy. When it’s time to get back to work it’s not difficult for them to focus in on what they need to get done because of how centered they are.

10. They Experience Less Guilt

According to research 29% of spouses say they don’t have enough privacy or time for themselves in the relationship. They aren’t afraid to express their feelings about what their status is with those they connect with enabling a new depth to relationships. It’s not uncommon for them to share exciting news like, “I decided I’m going to learn how to play piano!” The positive impact on others from their self confidence gives them a guilt free lifestyle, opening access to a world of “me” (MBG).

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Are you one of these rare people that enjoy their “me” time? Has it effected your life in a beneficial way? Comment below and share your experiences.

Featured photo credit: Ed Gregory via snap-photos.s3.amazonaws.com

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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