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10 Reasons People Who Enjoy Their “Me” Time Are More Likely To Be Successful

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10 Reasons People Who Enjoy Their “Me” Time Are More Likely To Be Successful

People who enjoy their me time know something we don’t. Introverts have significant advantage over the rest of us who like to shoot at the hip. It’s time to call them out for the all-stars they truly are. The contemplative nature of reserved types aren’t preoccupied with what the next moment holds. They are firmly placed in the present and experience a much richer life because of it.

Looking out for oneself has a bad rap these days. “How can you be so selfish?” An accusatory statement we use to jab at our significant other or friends for focusing more on themselves than us. But what if this is their trick to winning at life? Let your “me” flag fly and check this out.

1. They Enjoy Deeper Connections

Results from a study at the University of Michigan showed marriages where partners took their “me” time to be a significant factor of happiness. Believe it or not a faltering sex life was less of a cause for failed relationships than each partner having their opportunity to cultivate their own interests (MBG). Emotional availability is improved when they spend time routinely exploring their own mind. After all, they are fascinating people.

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2. They Never Leave The House With A Low Battery

Psychologists advocate our use of alone time in order to give our brains the reboot it needs. They are aware of how full their mind battery is at any given time which gives them access to deep thinking, concentration, productivity and problem solving. Not only that they are happier because of it. Sometimes it’s okay to step on the brakes and they know better than anyone (Happify).

3. They Know Calendars Are Their Best Friend

Schedule, schedule, schedule. Without this secret ingredient the “me” time never happens. Quality time for themselves is the most important over quantity and a British study supports this claim (MBG). By making head space for the “me” activity it leads to a greater wellbeing, better work engagement and an improved work-life balance. In todays world of always on electronics that is a breath of fresh air.

4. They Have Self Confidence

Saying “no” is something they have no problem doing because they spend time learning about what it is that truly makes them happy. When we spend time pleasing others it is easy to lose touch with what we want out of life. They are believers in the phrase, “Life is short, so live it.”

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5. Their Brains Are More Advanced

Naturally all of this quality “me” time leads to good decisions on what activities to engage in. They invest in good books, learning how to play a musical instrument or group sports. Part of what makes them so powerful as people is that they realize their time doesn’t always have to be spent alone. Human happiness comes from being social with others and grows our brains as a result.

6. They Are Way More Creative

When we are zoomed in on a problem it is hard to see the big picture. “Me” timers are apt to have free space in their minds for possibilities. The creative process is not one to rush and the introverted mind is superb at finding answers to questions most of us, including myself, cannot hack.

7. They Rise 30 Minutes Earlier

Getting up in the morning doesn’t have to be an ordeal for them. They know that even a small head start on the day gets the brain juices flowing earlier and makes room for them to express gratitude through a journal, read a book or start on the news. No matter how busy their schedule is they always seem to get more done than anyone else. Don’t be jealous, try it.

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8. They Close Their Door

The office or home environment can get chaotic at times. Alerting others to their focus on a project or creative process will allow the space they need to excel. Ditch the guilt of spending time away from the social bustle to prevent burn out. It makes them better friends, parents, partners and team members.

9. They Don’t Have Trouble Concentrating

Spending more time in the moment is easy when they look out for themselves. On average men enjoy 28 hours of leisure time where women only get around 25 hours. They realize that this time should be spent on high quality activities that they enjoy. When it’s time to get back to work it’s not difficult for them to focus in on what they need to get done because of how centered they are.

10. They Experience Less Guilt

According to research 29% of spouses say they don’t have enough privacy or time for themselves in the relationship. They aren’t afraid to express their feelings about what their status is with those they connect with enabling a new depth to relationships. It’s not uncommon for them to share exciting news like, “I decided I’m going to learn how to play piano!” The positive impact on others from their self confidence gives them a guilt free lifestyle, opening access to a world of “me” (MBG).

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Are you one of these rare people that enjoy their “me” time? Has it effected your life in a beneficial way? Comment below and share your experiences.

Featured photo credit: Ed Gregory via snap-photos.s3.amazonaws.com

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Last Updated on October 21, 2021

How to Create Your Own Ritual to Conquer Time Wasters and Laziness

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How to Create Your Own Ritual to Conquer Time Wasters and Laziness

Life is wasted in the in-between times. The time between when your alarm first rings and when you finally decide to get out of bed. The time between when you sit at your desk and when productive work begins. The time between making a decision and doing something about it.

Slowly, your day is whittled away from all the unused in-between moments. Eventually, time wasters, laziness, and procrastination get the better of you.

The solution to reclaim these lost middle moments is by creating rituals. Every culture on earth uses rituals to transfer information and encode behaviors that are deemed important. Personal rituals can help you build a better pattern for handling everything from how you wake up to how you work.

Unfortunately, when most people see rituals, they see pointless superstitions. Indeed, many rituals are based on a primitive understanding of the world. But by building personal rituals, you get to encode the behaviors you feel are important and cut out the wasted middle moments.

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Program Your Own Algorithms

Another way of viewing rituals is by seeing them as computer algorithms. An algorithm is a set of instructions that is repeated to get a result.

Some algorithms are highly efficient, sorting or searching millions of pieces of data in a few seconds. Other algorithms are bulky and awkward, taking hours to do the same task.

By forming rituals, you are building algorithms for your behavior. Take the delayed and painful pattern of waking up, debating whether to sleep in for another two minutes, hitting the snooze button, repeat until almost late for work. This could be reprogrammed to get out of bed immediately, without debating your decision.

How to Form a Ritual

I’ve set up personal rituals for myself for handling e-mail, waking up each morning, writing articles, and reading books. Far from making me inflexible, these rituals give me a useful default pattern that works best 99% of the time. Whenever my current ritual won’t work, I’m always free to stop using it.

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Forming a ritual isn’t too difficult, and the same principles for changing habits apply:

  1. Write out your sequence of behavior. I suggest starting with a simple ritual of only 3-4 steps maximum. Wait until you’ve established a ritual before you try to add new steps.
  2. Commit to following your ritual for thirty days. This step will take the idea and condition it into your nervous system as a habit.
  3. Define a clear trigger. When does your ritual start? A ritual to wake up is easy—the sound of your alarm clock will work. As for what triggers you to go to the gym, read a book or answer e-mail—you’ll have to decide.
  4. Tweak the Pattern. Your algorithm probably won’t be perfectly efficient the first time. Making a few tweaks after the first 30-day trial can make your ritual more useful.

Ways to Use a Ritual

Based on the above ideas, here are some ways you could implement your own rituals:

1. Waking Up

Set up a morning ritual for when you wake up and the next few things you do immediately afterward. To combat the grogginess after immediately waking up, my solution is to do a few pushups right after getting out of bed. After that, I sneak in ninety minutes of reading before getting ready for morning classes.

2. Web Usage

How often do you answer e-mail, look at Google Reader, or check Facebook each day? I found by taking all my daily internet needs and compressing them into one, highly-efficient ritual, I was able to cut off 75% of my web time without losing any communication.

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3. Reading

How much time do you get to read books? If your library isn’t as large as you’d like, you might want to consider the rituals you use for reading. Programming a few steps to trigger yourself to read instead of watching television or during a break in your day can chew through dozens of books each year.

4. Friendliness

Rituals can also help with communication. Set up a ritual of starting a conversation when you have opportunities to meet people.

5. Working

One of the hardest barriers when overcoming procrastination is building up a concentrated flow. Building those steps into a ritual can allow you to quickly start working or continue working after an interruption.

6. Going to the gym

If exercising is a struggle, encoding a ritual can remove a lot of the difficulty. Set up a quick ritual for going to exercise right after work or when you wake up.

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7. Exercise

Even within your workouts, you can have rituals. Spacing the time between runs or reps with a certain number of breaths can remove the guesswork. Forming a ritual of doing certain exercises in a particular order can save time.

8. Sleeping

Form a calming ritual in the last 30-60 minutes of your day before you go to bed. This will help slow yourself down and make falling asleep much easier. Especially if you plan to get up full of energy in the morning, it will help if you remove insomnia.

8. Weekly Reviews

The weekly review is a big part of the GTD system. By making a simple ritual checklist for my weekly review, I can get the most out of this exercise in less time. Originally, I did holistic reviews where I wrote my thoughts on the week and progress as a whole. Now, I narrow my focus toward specific plans, ideas, and measurements.

Final Thoughts

We all want to be productive. But time wasters, procrastination, and laziness sometimes get the better of us. If you’re facing such difficulties, don’t be afraid to make use of these rituals to help you conquer them.

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More Tips to Conquer Time Wasters and Procrastination

 

Featured photo credit: RODOLFO BARRETO via unsplash.com

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