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10 Things You May Not Know About MS (Multiple Sclerosis)

10 Things You May Not Know About MS (Multiple Sclerosis)

Do you know much about multiple sclerosis? If you do, it may be because you know someone who has it. I have a family member I’m fairly close with who has it and have heard from her about her condition for over ten years as it took control of her life. I’ve watched videos, read articles about promising treatments, and did some research. Sometimes what doctors and scientists don’t know is more alarming than what they do know. Right now, there are only treatments, no cures, and over 2.3 million people diagnosed to have multiple sclerosis.

But even if you are familiar with MS, here are 10 things you likely do not know. Share the knowledge. Awareness is a step toward a cure.

1.  There are 4 types of MS, but people will exhibit symptoms that are individual to them.

There are 4 types of disease courses identified in multiple sclerosis: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), primary-progressive MS (PPMS), secondary-progressive MS (SPMS), and progressive-relapsing MS. Within each “course,” there are varying degrees of severity. One person may be high functioning while another person with the same course could be considered disabled. Some people with the most severe symptoms in a course might need a caretaker. Regardless of being diagnosed with the same course of MS, the symptoms will be individual to each person. One person may experience severe memory loss while another person can lose control of their bladder intermittently while having some memory loss. Some people experience tremors. Others may experience blindness.

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2.  MS symptoms can be exacerbated.

Have you ever got a headache that worsened with noise? Or do you seem to get neck pain only when you have to take a test? Some stress has exacerbated your pain. MS symptoms can be manageable, like a light headache, but then they can be worsened when the sufferer experiences warmer than comfortable temperatures or when confronted by people that emotionally threaten them in some way. They experience stress acutely. A once sociable person may not be able to suffer the company of more than one person at a time or only can stand the company of people who are considerate about their condition. Stressful events, like an unpleasant medical procedure, can worsen symptoms. This is called exacerbation. It is life altering.

3.  MS is difficult to diagnose and can take YEARS to rule in while ruling out other possibilities.

Yes, I thought a doctor could just look at some blood samples and ask some questions and make some observations and then POOF! you’d have your diagnosis. No. It actually can be a long process. Doctors unfamiliar with MS as well as doctors who are familiar with it can take a long time making a proper diagnosis. And remember, there are varying types of MS called “courses” and each has varying degrees of severity. Then you have each person with their individual symptoms. So while people may guess a person has MS, there are blood tests and biopsies that have to be done by specialists who know what they are supposed to be ruling out before they can rule in MS. It can, and often does, take years to diagnose. MRI (a brain scan) is used to diagnose 90% of all cases at this point in time, but it is still just one of many tests that have to be completed. The MRI only shows swelling.

4.  MS can’t be cured; symptoms can only be lessened and treatments can be extreme.

Although experimental treatments and hopeful research for a cure make headlines, there are no headlines for the fact that people get the disease and then can only hope to manage symptoms and hope to lessen them. If a person with MS is lucky, their MS will lighten up for long periods of time or seem to disappear. It never goes away, but it does not get worse. If the person is unlucky, they get hit hard, don’t get any periods of relief, and continue to worsen even with medication and chemo treatments. The person I have in my life went as far as to have her eye muscles cut so her eyes would stop shaking. The shaking, after doing other treatments, including chemo, had not subsided and she was sick to her stomach from the constant eye movement. Other treatments to stop tremors have included the injection of a neurotoxin to cause partial or complete paralysis of specific muscles; this was done in an effort to regain control so she could walk more confidently and not suffer dizziness and nausea. She was able to gain some quality of life back, however, she never regained full function of anything affected by the MS.

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5.  MS symptoms can come and go over a lifetime.

You may think you know your own MS, but then it can suddenly change. You may regain bladder control, but then your short term memory really starts to fail you so you can’t remember who you just talked to on the phone. Then, just as suddenly, it can switch back. You may even feel you can walk without the assistance of a walker for days, then suddenly, wham! you fall just walking down the hall. You just don’t know how things are going to change. The unpredictability and loss of control are emotionally hard on even the most even-tempered of people. One day you can see or write your name, then suddenly you can’t do either, and you don’t know why. It just happens. Not only do the changing symptoms and severity make it hard to diagnose, but it makes it hard to predict the future. How much help could a person need? How independent can they live?

6.  Pain and sleeplessness are common symptoms of MS.

Over 50% of MS sufferers have pain and sleeplessness which exacerbate symptoms. They increase MS’s symptoms’ severity, then in turn, the pains, including headaches like migraines, and sleeplessness, get worse. Keeping cool and taking naps, avoiding stimulation and exertion, become critical. What is also critical is taking things to help the person sleep and be in less pain. The management of MS is ceaseless.

7.  MS is expensive.

I think the thing many people don’t ingest about chronic illnesses is the expense. To make it real, you need to understand that it costs $20,000 to $30,000 a year. That is more money a year than many earn as a salary. A full-time school teacher can start at $35,000. Thirty-thousand is the cost of a nice, new car. It is a down payment on a house. And that only covers the medications. People try to qualify for assistance any way they can, and some volunteer to be test subjects of new, experimental treatments. Their bodies and their income are ruled by MS once it takes over. Some continue to work; others will not be able to work. Those suffering the severe courses of MS will no longer have money for the luxuries others take for granted like specialty coffees, cell phones, and television. But then again, they may have had to stop drinking coffee because of caffeine. They may not be able to see the cell phone to dial a number. They may not be able to see the tv to turn it on.

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8.  MS changes what you can and should eat.

A healthy diet can help everyone, maybe especially those with MS, however, it becomes extreme for MS sufferers. because they become super-sensitive to caffeine, preservatives, fats, sodium, and other not-so-good things. It also gets theoretical, with fad or faux recommendations that hype super foods for curing or cursing a person’s internal systems making it harder for people to make sound decisions by confusing them. But the truth is, foods affect each person on an individual basis and there is no study that can say this diet is going to help or hurt. Just eat healthy is what all articles of substance say, and know that the person with MS ultimately will have to be the best judge of how processed food, sweets, and caffeine are effecting them. Here is a thread on the web that demonstrates how varied MS sufferers’ reactions to caffeine can be;  some people were even helped by coffee consumption while others were hurt by it.

9.  Exercise is critical for people with MS.

It is good for everyone to get regular exercise, point blank, but people with MS have got to exercise like their lives depend on it because it does. To retain a quality of life with less pain, more sleep, and more mobility without assistance, people with MS have to exercise regularly. It isn’t comfortable or easy. It is far from it. But the cost of not exercising is too steep because it is like opening the gate wide to MS and allowing it to walk all over you. And that brings me to number 10, people with MS have to become fighters.

10.  People with MS have to be fighters or become fighters.

The reality is that MS will make its presence known and its power felt at every opportunity. MS is a ravenous enemy. It wants total control of the body and doesn’t care how miserable the person becomes. It even thrives on the person’s frustration, anger, and depression. It blooms. It consumes strength faster as the muscles atrophy. It disrupts sleep so the person’s thinking becomes more confused, repetitive, and incomplete. It unhinges emotions so that tears and laughter erupt with less control. People with MS have to get up every day resolved to eat well, exercise regularly, rest often, and keep a regular schedule that can include weekly doctor appointments. They become dependent on a healthy routine to keep them safe from the enemy. They need friends, family, and medical professionals to support them in their daily battles.

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When it comes to chronic illnesses like MS, I would be surprised if someone could deal with it alone. MS steals away independence and self-control. But people are raising awareness, raising money, and working to find a cure. To learn more about how you can help, visit the Get Involved page of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society website.

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Last Updated on May 22, 2019

10 Simple Morning Exercises That Will Make You Feel Great All Day

10 Simple Morning Exercises That Will Make You Feel Great All Day

There are lots of studies that show if you do some exercise in the morning, you will be in a better mood all day long. You will have more energy and you will certainly be a better colleague, friend or partner.

One psychologist at Duke University has researched the effects of exercise on depressed patients and he has come to the conclusion that exercise has a definite role in treating this condition and has an important role in preventing people from relapsing.[1] According to the New York Times, scientists have now established that exercise also boosts your brain power.[2]

In addition, there are studies from the Appalachian State University which show that blood pressure can be reduced by doing regular morning exercise.[3]

Here are 10 simple morning exercises that will help you feel great the whole day long. You can include some of them in your morning exercise routine or do them all at home without having to enrol in a gym. Consult your doctor before starting any form of exercise routine if you are new to this.

1. Cat Camel Stretch

Stretching exercises are useful for muscle toning and also preventing arthritis. They can either be dynamic or static.

Dynamic ones such as the cat camel stretch, are particularly useful for doing other exercises in the morning. They are also beneficial at other times of the day, especially after long periods of sedentary work. This one is great for spinal flexibility and is a good warm up exercise.

Kneel down on all fours. Start by rounding your back just like a camel so that your head will try to meet your pelvis. This is the camel position. Then lower and lift your head so that your lower back is arched. This is the cat position. Do these movements slowly and smoothly. About 4 or 5 times.

Here’s a video to guide you through:

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2. Go for a Walk or a Run

This is better done outside so that you can connect with nature but running inside on a treadmill is almost as good. You can time yourself and increase length and time according to your fitness program.

Always have new goals to reach. Start with brisk walking and work up to running. At my age, I am still walking!

The health benefits are considerable. You can build stronger bones and you can help to maintain your weight.

Also, you are helping your heart to stay healthy and keeping your blood pressure low.

Learn more about the benefits of running here: 8 Benefits of Running 5 Minutes Every Day You Didn’t Know

3. Jumping Jacks

Michelle Obama is a great fan of this exercise and has become “Jumper in Chief.”[4] They are great for cardiovascular health and also for toning muscles especially the calves and the deltoids.

Stand with feet together. Jump while spreading your arms and legs. Return to first position and keep going! You can start with doing these for 1 minute and then gradually build up to the number you are comfortable with. Here’s how:

4. Abductor Side Lifts

Watch the video below to see how to do this exercise. These muscles are important because you use them everyday to run, get into the car or onto and off a bicycle. They are very important also for your core stability and prevent the pelvis from tilting.[5]

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Do about 10 to 15 raises for each side like this:

5. Balancing Table Pose

This is a classic yoga pose. It benefits the spine, balance, memory and concentration.

Start with the table pose (hands and knees). Breathe in before starting each movement. As you exhale, raise your left leg parallel to the floor as you raise the right arm, also parallel to the floor. Breathe in as you lower arm and leg. Repeat for the other side. 10 repetitions on each side is a good starting point.

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    6. Leg Squats

    Not just legs are involved but also hips and knees.

    Stand with your feet a bit further out from your hips. Arms are out in front of you. Then lower yourself as if you wanted to sit down until you reach a 90 degree angle. You can go down further if you want to. Then return to the starting position. Repeat 15 times for 2 sets for beginners.

    The benefits are that these exercises help with knee stability and can benefit the leg muscles such as quadriceps, hamstrings and calves.[6]

    7. Push Ups

    You start lying down (face down) but with your body held up at arm’s length. Your hands should be in line with your shoulders. Breathe in as you lower your body. That is fairly easy. Now, as you exhale, you have to get back up to the starting position.

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    An easier version to start with is to bend your legs at the knees so you do not have to lift your whole body.

    Beginners may take up to a month to be able to do 100 push ups so you will have to start with a very small number and gradually increase it.

    This exercise is great for strengthening the chest, shoulders and the triceps. It is a great strengthening exercise for many muscle groups. In fact, most muscles from the toes to the shoulders are being used.

    8. Bicycle Crunches

    There are numerous crunch exercises targeting the abs. The bicycle crunch is a variation where you work more muscle groups. Aim for 15 to 20 reps to start off with.

    Watch the video to see how this is done correctly:

    9. Lunges

    Stand with feet shoulder width apart. Place your hand on your hips. Take one giant step forward with the right leg. Make sure the knee does not go too far forward, that is, past your toes. The left knee will go down to almost floor level. Alternate the legs as you go on.

    Try to do a set of between 8 and 12 reps for each leg. It is important to allow for a day of rest, so this exercise should be done on alternate days, especially if you are using weights.

    This exercise is great for strengthening and toning the quadriceps, glutes and hamstrings.

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    10. Bicep Curls

    You can do this sitting down so if you spend a lot of time on the phone, this is a great exercise to do.

    Choose suitable dumbbells or another household object that you can easily hold. Sit down with the dumbbell in your hand. You need to sit forward a bit so that your triceps can lean on your thigh to give you support.

    Then bring the weighted arm up to shoulder length and then down again. Exhale as you lift the weight and inhale as you lower it.

    Here’re some important notes before you start doing this exercise:

    Try to do one or two sets of about ten repetitions for each arm and then switch arms.

    These exercises are really useful for toning the arm muscles.[7] In addition, they can strengthen and tone the brachioradialis muscle located in the forearm. These are the muscles we use to pick up things when we flex the arm at the elbow so we use these muscles countless times a day.

    You may have to build in a rest day for the heavier exercises, numbers 6–10. On the rest days, you can do gentler stretching exercises and also some walking or running.

    Morning exercise is not only a great mood booster, but will help you keep your weight down and also sleep better![8] Start including one or some of these exercises in your morning routine!

    More Articles About Exercises for Beginners

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Reference

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