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10 Things You May Not Know About MS (Multiple Sclerosis)

10 Things You May Not Know About MS (Multiple Sclerosis)

Do you know much about multiple sclerosis? If you do, it may be because you know someone who has it. I have a family member I’m fairly close with who has it and have heard from her about her condition for over ten years as it took control of her life. I’ve watched videos, read articles about promising treatments, and did some research. Sometimes what doctors and scientists don’t know is more alarming than what they do know. Right now, there are only treatments, no cures, and over 2.3 million people diagnosed to have multiple sclerosis.

But even if you are familiar with MS, here are 10 things you likely do not know. Share the knowledge. Awareness is a step toward a cure.

1.  There are 4 types of MS, but people will exhibit symptoms that are individual to them.

There are 4 types of disease courses identified in multiple sclerosis: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), primary-progressive MS (PPMS), secondary-progressive MS (SPMS), and progressive-relapsing MS. Within each “course,” there are varying degrees of severity. One person may be high functioning while another person with the same course could be considered disabled. Some people with the most severe symptoms in a course might need a caretaker. Regardless of being diagnosed with the same course of MS, the symptoms will be individual to each person. One person may experience severe memory loss while another person can lose control of their bladder intermittently while having some memory loss. Some people experience tremors. Others may experience blindness.

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2.  MS symptoms can be exacerbated.

Have you ever got a headache that worsened with noise? Or do you seem to get neck pain only when you have to take a test? Some stress has exacerbated your pain. MS symptoms can be manageable, like a light headache, but then they can be worsened when the sufferer experiences warmer than comfortable temperatures or when confronted by people that emotionally threaten them in some way. They experience stress acutely. A once sociable person may not be able to suffer the company of more than one person at a time or only can stand the company of people who are considerate about their condition. Stressful events, like an unpleasant medical procedure, can worsen symptoms. This is called exacerbation. It is life altering.

3.  MS is difficult to diagnose and can take YEARS to rule in while ruling out other possibilities.

Yes, I thought a doctor could just look at some blood samples and ask some questions and make some observations and then POOF! you’d have your diagnosis. No. It actually can be a long process. Doctors unfamiliar with MS as well as doctors who are familiar with it can take a long time making a proper diagnosis. And remember, there are varying types of MS called “courses” and each has varying degrees of severity. Then you have each person with their individual symptoms. So while people may guess a person has MS, there are blood tests and biopsies that have to be done by specialists who know what they are supposed to be ruling out before they can rule in MS. It can, and often does, take years to diagnose. MRI (a brain scan) is used to diagnose 90% of all cases at this point in time, but it is still just one of many tests that have to be completed. The MRI only shows swelling.

4.  MS can’t be cured; symptoms can only be lessened and treatments can be extreme.

Although experimental treatments and hopeful research for a cure make headlines, there are no headlines for the fact that people get the disease and then can only hope to manage symptoms and hope to lessen them. If a person with MS is lucky, their MS will lighten up for long periods of time or seem to disappear. It never goes away, but it does not get worse. If the person is unlucky, they get hit hard, don’t get any periods of relief, and continue to worsen even with medication and chemo treatments. The person I have in my life went as far as to have her eye muscles cut so her eyes would stop shaking. The shaking, after doing other treatments, including chemo, had not subsided and she was sick to her stomach from the constant eye movement. Other treatments to stop tremors have included the injection of a neurotoxin to cause partial or complete paralysis of specific muscles; this was done in an effort to regain control so she could walk more confidently and not suffer dizziness and nausea. She was able to gain some quality of life back, however, she never regained full function of anything affected by the MS.

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5.  MS symptoms can come and go over a lifetime.

You may think you know your own MS, but then it can suddenly change. You may regain bladder control, but then your short term memory really starts to fail you so you can’t remember who you just talked to on the phone. Then, just as suddenly, it can switch back. You may even feel you can walk without the assistance of a walker for days, then suddenly, wham! you fall just walking down the hall. You just don’t know how things are going to change. The unpredictability and loss of control are emotionally hard on even the most even-tempered of people. One day you can see or write your name, then suddenly you can’t do either, and you don’t know why. It just happens. Not only do the changing symptoms and severity make it hard to diagnose, but it makes it hard to predict the future. How much help could a person need? How independent can they live?

6.  Pain and sleeplessness are common symptoms of MS.

Over 50% of MS sufferers have pain and sleeplessness which exacerbate symptoms. They increase MS’s symptoms’ severity, then in turn, the pains, including headaches like migraines, and sleeplessness, get worse. Keeping cool and taking naps, avoiding stimulation and exertion, become critical. What is also critical is taking things to help the person sleep and be in less pain. The management of MS is ceaseless.

7.  MS is expensive.

I think the thing many people don’t ingest about chronic illnesses is the expense. To make it real, you need to understand that it costs $20,000 to $30,000 a year. That is more money a year than many earn as a salary. A full-time school teacher can start at $35,000. Thirty-thousand is the cost of a nice, new car. It is a down payment on a house. And that only covers the medications. People try to qualify for assistance any way they can, and some volunteer to be test subjects of new, experimental treatments. Their bodies and their income are ruled by MS once it takes over. Some continue to work; others will not be able to work. Those suffering the severe courses of MS will no longer have money for the luxuries others take for granted like specialty coffees, cell phones, and television. But then again, they may have had to stop drinking coffee because of caffeine. They may not be able to see the cell phone to dial a number. They may not be able to see the tv to turn it on.

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8.  MS changes what you can and should eat.

A healthy diet can help everyone, maybe especially those with MS, however, it becomes extreme for MS sufferers. because they become super-sensitive to caffeine, preservatives, fats, sodium, and other not-so-good things. It also gets theoretical, with fad or faux recommendations that hype super foods for curing or cursing a person’s internal systems making it harder for people to make sound decisions by confusing them. But the truth is, foods affect each person on an individual basis and there is no study that can say this diet is going to help or hurt. Just eat healthy is what all articles of substance say, and know that the person with MS ultimately will have to be the best judge of how processed food, sweets, and caffeine are effecting them. Here is a thread on the web that demonstrates how varied MS sufferers’ reactions to caffeine can be;  some people were even helped by coffee consumption while others were hurt by it.

9.  Exercise is critical for people with MS.

It is good for everyone to get regular exercise, point blank, but people with MS have got to exercise like their lives depend on it because it does. To retain a quality of life with less pain, more sleep, and more mobility without assistance, people with MS have to exercise regularly. It isn’t comfortable or easy. It is far from it. But the cost of not exercising is too steep because it is like opening the gate wide to MS and allowing it to walk all over you. And that brings me to number 10, people with MS have to become fighters.

10.  People with MS have to be fighters or become fighters.

The reality is that MS will make its presence known and its power felt at every opportunity. MS is a ravenous enemy. It wants total control of the body and doesn’t care how miserable the person becomes. It even thrives on the person’s frustration, anger, and depression. It blooms. It consumes strength faster as the muscles atrophy. It disrupts sleep so the person’s thinking becomes more confused, repetitive, and incomplete. It unhinges emotions so that tears and laughter erupt with less control. People with MS have to get up every day resolved to eat well, exercise regularly, rest often, and keep a regular schedule that can include weekly doctor appointments. They become dependent on a healthy routine to keep them safe from the enemy. They need friends, family, and medical professionals to support them in their daily battles.

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When it comes to chronic illnesses like MS, I would be surprised if someone could deal with it alone. MS steals away independence and self-control. But people are raising awareness, raising money, and working to find a cure. To learn more about how you can help, visit the Get Involved page of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society website.

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

    More Tips on Getting in Shape

    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

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