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How Does Richard Branson Overcome His Weaknesses?

How Does Richard Branson Overcome His Weaknesses?

“What would Richard Branson do?”

A question that many young individuals ask themselves whenever they are overcome with obstacles in life or business. Being one of the most successful entrepreneur today, Richard Branson has made a name of himself to be very at-ease with failure and obstacles. Although it may seem like everything he touches turns to gold, everything isn’t always peachy for him. Just like every human being on the planet, he has his own weaknesses. The difference between him and others though is the way he responds to his weaknesses. One of the reasons he became so successful is due to his way of turning his weaknesses into strengths, both for himself and his business. If he is an inspiration for you, you will want to read the rest of this article as I break down how he overcomes his weaknesses the Richard Branson way – quick and to the point!

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1. Richard Branson hates public speaking.

But he decided to see public speaking like a one-on-one conversation with someone he knows. Rather than focusing on the big audience in front of him, he pictured himself talking to one person and let his personality shine over his stage fright.

2. Richard Branson had a lack of experience.

But he made sure to focus on the product or service he could provide rather than his own experience. When he started his own newspaper, he didn’t have any experience in the business. Instead of letting other people know about his lack of experience, he shifted the light towards what the newspaper could provide – a voice for younger generations – which is what made it such a success. 

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3. Richard Branson has Dyslexia.

But he made his disorder part of his business, as he listened to speeches rather than reading them and provided visuals rather than long texts. If he could understand the campaign’s message quickly, he knew that the rest of the population could as well.

4. Richard Branson was Academically challenged.

But he took it as a sign that he was made for something greater. He knew from a young age that his thinking was different from the rest, and he embraced it by quitting school and following his visions. He didn’t let a grade affect his self-esteem or his dreams; the only grades he followed were the ones he gave himself.

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5. Richard Branson gets bored easily.

But he follows his fast-paced visions by jumping from one idea to the next. Whenever he opens a new business, he spends a few months concentrating on building it from the ground up and then hires people to run the business while he moves to his next great idea. This way, he doesn’t have time to get bored with the business, as he hands over the managing to someone who doesn’t get bored as easily. 

6. Richard Branson doesn’t like to fire quickly.

But he embraces this weaknesses by not making his company like every other one and treating each employee like family. A strong connection between employees and and employers is important for optimal results, and Richard Branson runs his businesses like his home, with the employees being family.

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7. Richard Branson was shy.

But he knows what he’s talking about and focuses on his knowledge rather than his shyness. He learns a lot about the subjects he is most likely to discuss, which gives him a boost in confidence as he approaches the stage or enters a room filled with people looking at him. He makes people laugh to loosen the tension in the conversation and make him more comfortable with the other person.

8. Richard Branson is not computer-savvy.

But he knows people who can do all the computer work for him. He delegates computer work to people who have the ability and knowledge to make the best of technology.

Featured photo credit: featured Photo Credit: Expert Elevation via expertelevation.com

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Sarah Anton

Editor and founder of The Fitrepreneur, aspires to improve people's living style.

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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