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How to Run Android Apps in your PC

How to Run Android Apps in your PC

Cell phones today have become everyday thing among the people from different walks of life. The reason that caused such proliferation of cellular phones is the existence of a vast amount of addictive applications and games that can be played on these cell phones. These apps and games significantly further the usability of a mobile phone and hence the most popular cell phones out there in the market, including but not limited to the Apple’s iPhone and other phones loaded with Android OS are leading with lots of apps with technological advancements that have the ability to be more productive.

The first apps to go viral at an unprecedented pace were the apps with calling and texting, which are capable of reducing the burden on your wallet by helping you stay in touch with your dear ones. Such apps are rightly called “Over The Top” or OTT apps, some examples are WeChat, WhatsApp, Viber, Line, Rebtel etc. The important differences in these apps are that only a few of these apps help you make phone calls (Rebtel and Viber), the others are only text messaging based.

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In my case, a dilemma that occupies me is why should I take these bulky cellular phones just to enjoy these apps, especially when I am next to a computer? Sadly, less than a handful of the app devloping companies have looked at creating their apps for a computer natively. Switching between phone and PC is time consuming since you need to stop whatever you need to work on your computer and again use your phone in order to use these applications. Viber for PC is the first and foremost step in this direction but it lacks a lot.

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Companies other than the ones that deal with app development have put a lot of efforts to make users capable of using Android applications on their laptops or computers. Their efforts have seen the bright light now, as it is possible to use Android apps on computers or laptops. Eureka! This solution is a side product of a method to allow application developers to test their phone apps during development on their computers before submitting them for review by the stores such as the Windows’ app store, Apple’s iTunes or the Google Play store. That is to say, a phone app developer could, if needed, try his/her Android phone app on personal machines using an emulator, test the app, and subsequently submit it for review. This is the same method we will use to enjoy Android apps on PC.

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Today we are going to discuss how can a novice user employ this information to use her favorite phone app on a laptop without the costly affair of a cellphone. This technique, of course, will apply equally even when you want to download Android games on your personal computer.

Steps to Get Android Games/Apps on your PC

  1. Download an Android emulator called Bluestacks. There is also Youwave, but it won’t work with ARM based apps.
  2. Install Bluestacks and run it. Note: You might run into graphics errors during installation, however you should be able to find a solution to most of the Bluestacks errors here.
  3. On the home page of Bluestacks, click on the search button and type in the name of the app or the game you want.
  4. Select one of the many app stores and install the app.
  5. Go back to the home page and you should see the app listed there, you should be able to double click the app and run it.

I hope you find this tutorial helpful. Feel free to leave a comment if you are stuck anywhere or need specific instructions for your favorite game or app.

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Mukesh Agarwal

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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