Advertising

Things You Should Do Online Instead of Facebook

Things You Should Do Online Instead of Facebook
Advertising

The Internet has brought us many useful tools and facilities we should be enriching our lives with, but the fact is: we’re not. Most times, people log on to check in on (read: stalk) their “friends” on Facebook, screen emails, and look at highly-processed pictures of places and things they’ll never see in real life (nor truly pay attention to in the moment if they do). That doesn’t sound like a world I want to live in, and neither should you…

An amazing place, the Internet is home to a myriad of societies and cultures so expansive that even someone with obscure or avant-garde taste can feel comfortable and understood. As someone who spends a lot of personal and professional time online, I wanted more.

I don’t want my headstone to read “RIP Facebook User 2349583;” I refuse to go out like that. To help you achieve your equally exciting eZen moment, I’ve compiled a short list of things you should do online so the Internet achieves greater purpose in your life. You’re welcome!

Advertising

1. You Should Be Making Money

We get it: the global economic downturn kicked us all in the proverbial nuts. But the statistics on how much time and money people spend online aren’t meant to make you depressed; they’re meant to inspire you! People with no formal business background are setting up their own web pages and making money online. Sure, we suggest it like it’s the easiest thing ever, and like anything successful, it takes hard work. But if you’re going to spend hours a day online, why not make those hours more productive?

Sites like Etsy and Freelancer.com are modest testimonies to how the internet empowers passionate people to make money online. Fivver, mTurk, and other sites provide additional ways of boosting income, and as always, don’t forget to keep ads on your site from easy-to-use services such as Google Adwords and Amazon Affiliates.

Already online but need to give your business an eBoost? There are tools like toll free forwarding to take your current online business further. Armed with a 1-800 number, exceptional WiFi, and a snazzy webpage, you could turn bandwidth into bucks in no time! (Your next mission: deciding what to peddle online…)

Advertising

2. You Should Be Falling In Love

This isn’t a new concept; we’ve been doing this since time immemorial (albeit not always successfully), but finding love online has had a sticky stigma for quite some time. Many people found their soulmate and OTP (one true pairing, in case you’re not a fangirl or fanboy) just by chatting on forums and social media, but insufficient merit is given to the internet as a conduit of love. “Love online” for many people still conjures images of sneaking around to type dirty to strangers in untraceable (FYI, everything’s traceable by both governments and corporations) instant messenger chats, but things have changed drastically in the past decade.

Brian Penny Versability Match Profile

    Dating websites have cleaned up their acts, making it easy for educated, eloquent professionals of every designation to log on to get their grove on! Some require payment and others are free, but all of them can be fun if you give them and yourself a chance. With a tastefully accurate picture of yourself & an honest, interesting profile, you could be chatting or even meeting with someone you otherwise may not have met because it wasn’t in the cards.

    Advertising

    If sitting at the bar Friday night after Friday night is no longer working for you, take that dedication to an online dating site. Even if you don’t find Mr. or Mrs. Right, you can at least find friends who may be closer than you think. And who doesn’t want a buddy?

    3. You Should Be Vlogging

    This one’s a little tricky – you’re either into it or not – but read me out; vlogging makes people happy. There’s no shortage of free online and cloud platforms for people to upload original content, and you ought to investigate this for your own peace of mind. On YouTube alone, there are vloggers or video bloggers who even make money putting their thoughts and opinions on the internet.

    This list is just a sample and no, we’re not suggesting that you become the next Jenna Marbles, but if you have something to say and aren’t afraid of putting you voice and face out there, give vlogging a whirl. If you grew up in the age of handwriting in a diary or are tired of the lifeless posts in your Facebook timeline, you’ll appreciate the catharsis of vlogging.

    Advertising

    More by this author

    7 Ways To Make Exercise Fun For Everyone Say Goodbye to a Skinny Body: How to Gain Weight Fast 24 Easy Ways To Make Money On The Internet What 500 Calories Really Looks Like in Different Foods 20 Awesome Screensavers that Make your Desktop Delightful

    Trending in Productivity

    1 How To Boost Employee Motivation During Difficult Times 2 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 3 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 4 5 Values of an Effective Leader 5 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on July 21, 2021

    The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

    The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
    Advertising

    No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

    Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

    Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

    A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

    Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

    In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

    Advertising

    From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

    A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

    For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

    This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

    The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

    That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

    Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

    Advertising

    The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

    Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

    But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

    The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

    The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

    A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

    For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

    Advertising

    But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

    If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

    For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

    These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

    For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

    How to Make a Reminder Works for You

    Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

    Advertising

    Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

    Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

    My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

    Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

    I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

    More on Building Habits

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Advertising

    Reference

    [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

    Read Next