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11 Valuable Lessons From the Greatest Innovative Leaders

11 Valuable Lessons From the Greatest Innovative Leaders

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    1. Improve upon what already exists

    Many people seem to confuse innovation with invention. To innovate, it isn’t necessary to discover something as exciting as the telephone. Innovation is the successful introduction of a new idea to the marketplace. Invention, on the other hand, is the discovery of a new idea. Innovation is fortunately far more attainable.

    During the past two centuries, innovation has more than doubled our life span and given us cheap energy and more food. If we project what the world will be like 10 years from now without continuing innovation in health, energy or food, the picture is dark. -Bill Gates, Microsoft.

    2. Create clear goals

    In order to be an innovative leader, it is important to question why your idea is important to your business. Are you hoping to use the idea to increase sales, improve customer service, or maintain your position in the market? Have an idea of where you want to go in the future and then get stuck in.

    Grit is often the single-most predictor of success. Grit is not just about stubborn persistence. It’s also about choosing the right goal in the first place. The unfortunate reality is that it’s not all going to happen. How can we make sure all our struggle and sacrifice will be worth it? Make sure it passes the underwear test. -Jonah Lehrer, author and journalist

    3. See the bigger picture

    Innovative leaders who are successful at innovation regularly think outside the box. They understand the importance of analyzing their business model to find ways to stand out from competitors. The more world experience they have, the more they notice gaps in the market and the wider their exposure to new ideas, people and perspectives.

    I work really hard at trying to see the big picture and not getting stuck in ego. I believe we’re all put on this planet for a purpose, and we all have a different purpose… When you connect with that love and that compassion, that’s when everything unfolds. –Ellen DeGeneres

    4. Think about the users more than the product

    Current trends and feedback are regularly considered by innovative leaders. They also tend to read widely. They are curious about the world, love learning, and get feedback from their customers because they offer the best ‘hands-on’ experience–both good and bad–of your company. Think about how you can enrich the lives of others.

    We believe that if we focus on the users, the money will come. In a truly virtual business, if you’re successful, you’ll be working at something that’s so necessary people will pay for it in subscription form. Or you’ll have so many users that advertisers will pay to sponsor the site. -Marissa Mayer, Vice President, Google

    5. Be creative

    Innovation is creative, cutting-edge, and is ignited by an inquiring mind. Try this simple approach: ask questions. The answers allow you to begin innovating. Asking meaningful questions helps create clarity and deliver answers. You cannot innovate if you do not ask yourself or others questions. Innovative leaders are brave and embrace change.

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    Listen to anyone with an original idea, no matter how absurd it may sound at first. If you put fences around people, you get sheep. Give people the room they need. -William McKnight, 3M President

    6. Do what you love, don’t just do it for the money

    Passion encourages determination and perseverance. When you do something purely for financial gain, it is harder to keep the energy going. When you love what you do, the time whizzes by and you feel fulfilled. The money automatically follows.

    I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: ‘If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?’ And whenever the answer has been ‘No’ for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something. -Steve Jobs, Apple Corporation.

    7. Believe in the impossible and be willing to fail

    Most innovative leaders faced negativity from others, but they believed in themselves and their visions despite this. Start doing and you will be ahead of those who just think and never do. Take action and be willing to fail along the way. This is part of the process. Don’t allow fear and worry to get the better of you.

    If you’re not failing every now and again, it’s a sign you’re not doing anything very innovative. -Woody Allen, actor, author, screenwriter, film director

    8. Be a “forward thinker”

    Need a service that doesn’t exist? Are you looking for a product that you know would be useful but can’t find it? Innovative leaders use these opportunities to identify possible gaps that exist and find a way to bring these ideas to fruition.

     “I always did something I was a little not ready to do. I think that’s how you grow. When there’s that moment of ‘Wow, I’m not really sure I can do this,’ and you push through those moments, that’s when you have a breakthrough. –Marissa Mayer, CEO, Yahoo

    9. Be people-friendly

    Many deals are done in business based upon the relationship between two parties. It pays to be likeable, open, and sincere in your endeavors to secure the cooperation and support from others along the way.

    We live in a social world, and it is almost impossible to physically cut yourself off from other people. But, how we interact with others is vitally important to our happiness and success. Getting along with people and allowing them to be themselves, bringing out the best, encouraging them — these are the hallmarks of good leaders. -Richard Branson, Virgin Group

    10. Don’t be afraid of change

    We all tend to resist the idea of change. To be innovative, it is necessary to embrace change and revel in the idea of the new and exciting changes that propel us through our ever-changing world.

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    The vast majority of human beings dislike and even actually dread all notions with which they are not familiar… Hence it comes about that at their first appearance innovators have generally been persecuted, and always derided as fools and madmen. –Aldous Huxley

    11. Be persistent

    If at first you don’t succeed, try again. Success is not linear and most innovative leaders have experienced their fair share of failure. Don’t give up at the first sign of trouble.

    Innovation almost always is not successful the first time out. You try something and it doesn’t work and it takes confidence to say we haven’t failed yet. … Ultimately you become commercially successful. -Clayton Christensen, professor at Harvard Business School

    Innovative leaders have a lot to teach us, but no one has all the answers. Believe in yourself and remember that we are all learning new things every day. Be bold, be brave and act upon your brilliant ideas.

    Featured photo credit: Dent in universe/Celestine Chua via flickr.com

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    Mandy Kloppers

    Mandy is a Psychologist/CBT therapist who believes getting through life is easier with a robust sense of humour.

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    Last Updated on March 23, 2021

    Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

    Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

    One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

    The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

    You need more than time management. You need energy management

    1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

    How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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    I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

    I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

    2. Determine your “peak hours”

    Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

    Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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    My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

    In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

    Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

    3. Block those high-energy hours

    Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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    Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

    If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

    That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

    There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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    Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

    Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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