Advertising
Advertising

55 Inspiring Quotes from U.S. Presidents That Will Change Your Life

55 Inspiring Quotes from U.S. Presidents That Will Change Your Life

A leader is someone who inspires others, who leads by example and motivates people to be better and move forward no matter how hard the challenges might be.  No matter if they’re leading a country, a business, a household or a team. These are some inspiring quotes from U.S. presidents which will motivate the leader within yourself.

“Ninety-nine percent of failures come from people who make excuses.” ― George Washington (1732–1799)

“The harder the conflict, thegreater the triumph.” ― George Washington

“Honesty is the first chapter of the book wisdom.” ― Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

inspirational-quote-action-thomas-jefferson

    personalexellence.co

    “On matters of style, swim with the current, on matters of principle, stand like a rock.” ― Thomas Jefferson

    “The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.” ― James Madison (1751–1836)

    james-madison-quotations-sayings-famous-quotes-47683

      quotesdump.com

      “If tyranny and oppression come to this land it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.” ― James Madison

      “A little flattery will support a man through great fatigue” ― James Monroe (1758–1831)

      “Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air.” ― John Quincy Adams (1767–1848)

      Advertising

      “Try and fail, but don’t fail to try.” ― John Quincy Adams

      actionsinspire

        credit: www.mosthost.net

        “One man with courage makes a majority.” ― Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)

        “It’s easier to do a job right, than to explain why you didn’t.” ― Martin Van Buren (1782–1862)

        “There is nothing more corrupting, nothing more destructive of the noblest and finest feelings of our nature, than the exercise of unlimited power.” ― William Henry Harrison (1773–1841)

        “It is not strange… to mistake change for progress” ― Millard Fillmore (1800–1874)

        “You don’t know what you can miss before you try.” ― Franklin Pierce (1804–1869)

        “I am a slow walker, but I never walk backwards” ― Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

        abraham-lincoln-quote-shepherd-insurance-blog-120225

          brainguidance.com

          – “In the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years” ― Abraham Lincoln

          “”Leave nothing for tomorrow which can be done today.” ― Abraham Lincoln

          Advertising

          “Whatever you are, be a good one.” ― Abraham Lincoln

          “Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” ― Abraham Lincoln

          “There are men and women who make the world better just by being the kind of people they are. They have the gift of kindness or courage or loyalty or integrity. It really matters very little whether they are behind the weel of a truck or running a business or bringing up a family. They teach the truth by living it.” ― James Garfield (1831–1881)

          “If wrinkles must be written on our brow, let them not be written on our heart. The spirit should never grow old.”  ― James Garfield 

          “Great lives never go out; they go on.” ― Benjamin Harrison (1833–1901)

          “It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.” ― Theodore Roosevelt  (1858–1919)

          “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” ― Theodore Roosevelt

          dwight_d_eisenhower_freedom_6500

            quotespedia.info

            “Be patient and calm; no one can catch a fish with anger.” ― Herbert Hoover  (1874–1964)

            “Words without actions are the assassins of idealism.” ― Herbert Hoover

            “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt, (1882–1945)

            “Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

            Advertising

            “What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight- it’s the size of the fight in the dog.” ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

            “Never question another man’s motive. His wisdom, yes, but not his motives.” ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

            “It’s amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.” ― Harry S. Truman (1884–1972)

            “Never waste a minute thinking about people you don’t like.” ― Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890–1969)

            “The Chinese use two brush strokes to write the word ‘crisis.’ One brush stroke stands for danger; the other for opportunity. In a crisis, be aware of the danger–but recognize the opportunity.” ― John F. Kennedy (1917–1963)

            jfk-strong

              aprojectforkindness.wordpress.com

              “Conformity is the jailer of freedom and the enemy of growth.” ― John F. Kennedy

              “The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality.” ― John F. Kennedy

              “One person can make a difference, and everyone should try.” ― John F. Kennedy

              “Forgive your enemies, but never forget their names.” ― John F. Kennedy

              “We become not a melting pot but a beautiful mosaic. Different people, different beliefs, different yearnings, different hopes, different dreams.” ― Jimmy Carter (born 1924)

              “Live simply, love generously, care deeply, speak kindly, leave the rest to God.” ― Ronald Reagan  (1911–2004)

              Advertising

              “I have opinions of my own – strong opinions – but I don’t always agree with them.” ― George H.W. Bush (born 1924)

              “A volunteer is a person who can see what others cannot see; who can feel what most do not feel. Often, such gifted persons do not think of themselves as volunteers, but as citizens – citizens in the fullest sense: partners in civilization.” ― George H.W. Bush

              “We all do better when we work together. Our differences do matter, but our common humanity matters more.” ― Bill Clinton  (born 1946)

              “When our memories outweigh our dreams, it is then that we become old.” ― Bill Clinton

              “There’s an old saying in Tennessee — I know it’s in Texas, probably in Tennessee — that says, fool me once, shame on — shame on you. Fool me — you can’t get fooled again.” George W. Bush  (born 1946)

              “If you’re walking down the right path and you’re willing to keep walking, eventually you’ll make progress” ― Barack Obama  (born 1961)

              barack_obama_quote_4

                notable-quotes.com

                “Change will not come if we wait for some other person, or if we wait for some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.” ― Barack Obama

                “The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope.” ― Barack Obama

                “Yes We Can!” ― Barack Obama

                More by this author

                5 Things You Can Gain From An Unpaid Internship 55 Inspiring Quotes from U.S. Presidents That Will Change Your Life 5 Inspiring Reasons Why You Should Dare to Be a Vegetarian Traveler

                Trending in Productivity

                1 Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed 2 To Automate or not to Automate Your Personal Productivity System 3 How to Increase Brain Power: 10 Simple Ways to Train Your Brain 4 The Productivity Paradox: What Is It And How Can We Move Beyond It? 5 Forget Learning How to Multitask: Boost Productivity 10X More with Focus

                Read Next

                Advertising
                Advertising
                Advertising

                Last Updated on October 15, 2019

                Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

                Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

                There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

                Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

                Why we procrastinate after all

                We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

                Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

                Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

                Advertising

                To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

                If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

                So, is procrastination bad?

                Yes it is.

                Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

                Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

                Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

                It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

                Advertising

                The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

                Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

                For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

                A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

                Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

                Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

                How bad procrastination can be

                Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

                Advertising

                After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

                One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

                That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

                Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

                In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

                You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

                More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

                Advertising

                8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

                Procrastination, a technical failure

                Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

                It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

                It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

                Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

                Reference

                Read Next