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3 Simple Hacks to Unlock 5 Hidden Hours Each Week

3 Simple Hacks to Unlock 5 Hidden Hours Each Week

“I just didn’t have the time.”

People say it without even thinking. It’s by far the number one muttered excuse for not getting things done. What people should really be saying is… “I didn’t make it a priority.”

There are hours and hours of hidden productivity in all of our lives, no matter who you are. And I’m not talking about doing things like working 80 hours a week, sleeping less, or anything else that is going to take away from your health and slowly kill you over time.

I’m talking about a few simple hacks you can use to free up extra time in your life by getting more stuff done that matters. Because at the end of the day, those things that you say “I just didn’t have enough time” to, are things that are supposed to be priorities for you.

This is a simple explanation of what I call, The Productivity Blueprint.

First, Eliminate

What activities in your life have absolutely no value, or an incredibly low amount of value? Think about it. There are a lot of low value things that we do, such as watching TV, but for some people that brings them joy and helps them relax, so I consider that valuable. My advice for recreation is to focus on the stuff that brings you the highest amount of joy, and maybe let the rest slide a bit.

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Past a certain point, some types of recreation might not provide value at all. They might just be “something to do.”

What I want you to do is completely eliminate the things that you do in your life that have no value towards your priorities (that are hopefully time-based). These may be things like:

  • Reading trash magazines
  • Watching excessive amounts of television (Especially the news. It’s called The Internet.)
  • Spending an excessive amount of time browsing the web and social media (except this article)
  • Talking on the phone (some people are literally addicted to this)
  • Deleting 50 emails a day (just unsubscribe)
  • Excessive driving (commuting outside of rush hour can easily save you an hour a week or more)
  • Looking for stuff (just get organized!)
  • Figuring out what to do next (you should always work from a list)
  • And more…

My advice is to be aggressive with yourself. Really question your daily routine. Even the most productive of us, myself included, have our time wasters.

By practicing just a tiny bit of elimination, you can often grab 2-3 hours a week, by doing this alone.

Then, Automate

After you’ve gone through the elimination step, you’ve inherently told yourself that everything else that you do is somehow important.

In the automation step, you’re going to take advantage of technology to streamline your daily life.

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The absolute best thing you can automate is your personal finances. The world of paperless billing and automated transactions can save literally 5-10 hours a month.

If you’re still in the paper world even with a single bill, think about how much time you spend walking that paper trail, for ONE thing:

  • Walking to the mailbox
  • Opening the envelope while trying not to cut yourself
  • Fumbling through the pages of a bill you don’t want to see anyway
  • Finding your checkbook and dusting it off
  • Traveling back to 1998
  • Moving the cat from your desk
  • Writing a check
  • Finding an envelope to mail it in
  • Searching for your stamps in a drawer of other useless junk
  • Figuring out how to fit your bill and check securely in the return envelope
  • Moving the cat again
  • Sealing your envelope
  • Writing the return address on the envelope
  • Mailing the envelope

And I probably left out some steps… not to mention the distractions you will no doubt encounter along the way.

I don’t know about you, but that would take me like 45 minutes at least. Most of it would be remember how to write a check.

But consider the paperless route, and paying that bill automatically from your account. Here’s the process.

  • Do nothing

Yep, that’s it. Doing nothing in this case produces the exact same result in infinity less time, and you only have to set it up once.

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If you’re a real technophobe, set up an alert for when your bill is paid. That’ll take you 30 seconds max to read in your email.

The real beauty here is that this time saving strategy works to your advantage every time you pay that bill. So you’re not just saving time once. You’re benefiting every time you would have to pay that bill.

There are other ways you can automate your life as well, including:

  • Having non-perishables delivered on a schedule through Amazon Subscribe, eliminating trips to the store
  • Configuring automatic updates and virus scans on your computer
  • Setting up automated filters in your email to keep it organized it for you
  • Using a call screener on your phone to eliminate unwanted phone calls
  • Get automated appliances to manage your home for you

Using technology to automate your life can easily save you 2-3 hours a week, even on a small scale.

Last, Outsource

Everything left over that you can’t either eliminate or automate, is a candidate for outsourcing, which means having someone else do lower value tasks for you. It’s a money for time trade in most cases.

The easiest way to figure out the things you can outsource is to ask yourself one simple question – “What can’t someone else do for me?”

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This literally means to put the things at the top of your list that only you can do, such as working on a project that only you have the knowledge to complete. For example, no one could write this article for me, at least not how I want to write it.

Other lower value items like housework, yard work, daily errands, and other tiny remedial tasks that can easily be routine-driven and systematized (yes, that’s a word), etc, can be completed by someone else.

If money is an issue, question what you’re spending your money on as well. It’s often a lot better to free up time for important tasks than it is to have a few more extra bucks here and there.

Outsourcing effectively can gain you a massive amount of time, several hours per week on a small scale, and even in the double digit realm on a larger scale.

Conclusion

By following the hierarchy of Eliminating, Automating, then Outsourcing, you can easily grab an extra 5 hours each week, if not much much more, to complete your high priority projects.

You’ll never be able to say “I just didn’t have enough time” again.

More by this author

Cody Wheeler

Cody is a self-improvement blogger at Academy Success, the place to learn life skills you don't learn in school.

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Last Updated on March 31, 2020

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How often do you find yourself procrastinating? Do you wish you could procrastinate less? We all know how debilitating procrastination can make us feel, and it seems to be a challenge we all share. Procrastination is one of the biggest hindrances to moving forward and doing the things that we want to in life.

There are many reasons why you might be procrastinating, and sometimes, it is really difficult to pinpoint why. You might be procrastinating because of something related to the past, present, or future (they are all intertwined), or it could be as simple as biological factors. Whatever the reason, most of us follow a cycle when we procrastinate, from the moment we decide to do something to actually getting it done, or in this case, not getting it done.

The Vicious Procrastination Cycle

For some reason, it helps to understand that we all go through the same thing, even though we often feel like the only person in the world who struggles with this. Do you resonate with the cycle below?

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it!

2. Apprehension Starts to Come Up

The beginning stages of optimism are starting to fade. There is still time, but you haven’t done anything yet, and you start to feel uneasy. You realize that you actually have to do something to get it done, and that good intentions are not enough.

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3. Still No Action

More time has passed. You still haven’t taken any action and probably have a lot of excuses why. You start to panic a little and wish you had started sooner. Your panic starts to turn into frustration and perhaps even irritability.

4. Flicker of Hope Left

You can still make it; there is a little time left and you ponder how you are going to get it done. The rush you get from leaving your task until the last minute gives you a flicker of hope. There is still time; you can do this!

5. Fading Quickly

Your hope starts to quickly fade as you try desperately to understand why you just can’t do this. You may feel desperate and have thoughts like, “What is wrong with me?” and “Why do I ALWAYS do this?” You feel discouraged, or perhaps angry and resentful at yourself.

6. Vow to Yourself

Once the feeling of anger or disappointment disappears, you most likely swear to yourself that this will never happen again; that this was the last time and next time will be different.

Does this sound like you? Is the next time different? I understand the devastating effect that procrastination has on many lives, and for some, it is a really serious problem. You also have, on the other hand, those who procrastinate but it doesn’t affect them in any way. You know whether it is affecting you or not and whether it undermines your results.

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How to Break the Procrastination Cycle

Unless you break the cycle, you will keep reinforcing it!

To break the cycle, you need to change the sequence of events. Here is my suggestion on how you can effectively break the vicious cycle you are in!

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it! The first stage is always the same.

2. Plan

Thinking alone will not help; you need to plan your actions. I always put my deadlines one or two days in advance because you know Murphy’s Law! Take into consideration everything that you need to do, how long it will take you, and what you will need to get it done, then plan the individual steps.

3. Resistance

Just because you planned doesn’t mean that this time is guaranteed to be different. You will most likely still feel the resistance so expect this. This stage is key to identifying why you are procrastinating, so when you feel the resistance, try to identify it immediately.

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What is causing you to hesitate in this moment? What do you feel?  Write them down if it helps.

4. Confront Those Feelings

Once you have identified what could possibly be holding you back, for example, fear of failure, lack of motivation, etc. You need to work on lessening the resistance.

Ask yourself, “What do I need to do to move forward? What would make it easier?” If you find that you fear something, overcoming that fear is not something that will happen overnight — keep this in mind.

5. Put Results Before Comfort

You need to keep moving forward and put results before comfort. Take action, even if it is only for 10 minutes. The key is to break the cycle and not reinforce it. You have more control that you think.

6. Repeat

Repeat steps 3-5 until you achieve what you first set out to do.

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Final Thoughts

Change doesn’t happen overnight, and if you have some deeper underlying reasons why you procrastinate, it may take longer to finally break the cycle.

If procrastination is holding you back in life, it is better to deal with it now than to deal with the negative consequences later on. It is not a question of comfort anymore; it is a question of results. What is more important to you?

Learn more about how to stop procrastinating here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

Featured photo credit: Luke Chesser via unsplash.com

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