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14 Habits Of Highly Excellent People

14 Habits Of Highly Excellent People

Highly excellent people seem to have it all figured out, don’t they? There’s stress and chaos going on all around them, but they barely break a sweat. They just go about their excellency and leave the rest of us who aren’t feeling very…well, excellent…to wonder what we’re doing wrong. What can we do to upgrade our lives and become highly excellent people? What are they doing that’s so different from what we’re doing?

As it turns out, a lot. Here’s a breakdown of what highly excellent people have in common so you can get in on the action too:

1. They focus on quality over quantity.

Their priorities are top of mind and never waver. Instead of being bogged down by details and expectations, they keep their stress levels in check by accomplishing what’s most important to them first, and then dedicating the time that’s left to the little extras.

2. They put their health/well-being first.

Highly excellent people know they can’t accomplish anything of any quality when they feel like sh…crap. They always put their health and well-being first: They exercise regularly, eat healthy, and always make time for leisurely activities and hobbies they consider relaxing.

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3. They know their strengths and weaknesses.

We all have strengths and weaknesses, but instead of suppressing their weaknesses and struggling to overcome them, highly excellent people accept and work with their shortcomings (after all, the harder you try to deny something about yourself, the stronger it becomes). From personal experience, it’s also a great way to keep your self-esteem intact. Nobody can accept who you are in your entirety until you do.

4. They trust their instincts.

Highly excellent people are a sucker for their instincts. They don’t cater to what others expect of them – their compass always points toward what they expect from themselves.

5. They have high standards.

Not only do they have high standards, they don’t allow the concept of high standards to intimidate them. They understand nothing’s perfect, but find deep satisfaction in doing things to the best of their ability. They know it’s a lot easier to do things right the first time than to have to redo them later.

6. They have a plan.

Highly excellent people know exactly what they want, both professionally and personally. They have a very clear picture of what their life will look like if they keep striving and keep moving ahead. They also don’t settle for anything less than what they want.

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7. They don’t sacrifice their creativity.

By that I mean, they don’t let the concept of potentially living out of a shopping cart intimidate them. Sure, they might go through the occasional financial drought where all that’s on the menu is peanut butter sandwiches, but at least they feel alive. They don’t take on jobs they don’t believe in for the sake of making money – they use the threat of having to do so as fuel and work harder on their big picture.

8. They set realistic goals.

They don’t create to-do lists that not even a robot could complete in a timely manner. When they set their goals, they always factor in time for, you know, eating, sleeping, even going to the bathroom. They appreciate showering too.

9. They singletask.

Highly excellent people know multitasking is a crock. See #1.

10. They constantly adjust their course.

Success doesn’t happen in a straight line. It’s more like steering a car: You keep the car straight by moving the steering wheel from side-to-side to stay on track. This is how highly excellent people tackle their goals: They constantly evolve, integrate new strategies, and reevaluate after each step.

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11. They automate what will never change.

Laundry, drag. Dishes, barf. Emails, puh-lease! This is where many of us trip over ourselves as highly excellent people breeze right past us. Instead of becoming annoyed and disrupted by the ongoing details of maintaining their lifestyle, they use them to their advantage by creating creativity pillars.

What they want to accomplish isn’t easy. Their day is filled with uncertainty, but the above ongoing tasks are certain. They will always be there. Highly excellent people have automated these habits so they can get them done quickly while using the least amount of energy possible. Genius, no?

12. They do what they love.

I mean, really, what else is there?

13. They work smart.

They work in short bursts of 30 to 90 minutes, with short breaks in between to regroup and rest before moving on to the next task. Some days they’ll only work for four hours, while others they’ll work eight. It all depends on what needs to be done that day. They do what it takes to make it happen, but without burning themselves out in the process.

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14. They trust in their talent.

No matter who tries (whether intentionally or not) to disrupt their thought process or plant seeds of doubt, highly excellent people know without a doubt that they’re doing exactly what they want to be doing exactly when they want to be doing it. Can their critics say the same?

What do you admire most about highly excellent people? Let us know in the comments.

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Krissy Brady

A women's health & wellness writer with a short-term goal to leave women feeling a little more empowered and a little less verklempt.

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Last Updated on June 3, 2020

How to Write SMART Goals (With SMART Goals Templates)

How to Write SMART Goals (With SMART Goals Templates)

Everyone needs a goal. Whether it’s in a business context or for personal development, having goals help you strive towards something you want to accomplish. It prevents you from wandering around aimlessly without a purpose.

But there are good ways to write goals and there are bad ways. If you want to ensure you’re doing the former, keep reading to find out how a SMART goals template can help you with it.

The following video is a summary of how you can write SMART goals effectively:

What Are SMART Goals?

SMART Goals

refer to a way of writing down goals that follow a specific criteria. The earliest known use of the term was by George T. Doran in the November 1981 issue of Management Review, however, it is often associated with Peter Drucker’s management by objectives concept.[1]

SMART is an acronym that stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. There are other variations where certain letters stand for other things such as “achievable” instead of attainable, and “realistic” instead of relevant.

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What separates a SMART goal from a non-SMART goal is that, while a non-SMART goal can be vague and ill-defined, a SMART goal is actionable and can get you results. It sets you up for success and gives you a clear focus to work towards.

And with SMART goals comes a SMART goals template. So, how do you write according to this template?

How to Write Smart Goals Using a SMART Goals Template

For every idea or desire to come to fruition, it needs a plan in place to make it happen. And to get started on a plan, you need to set a goal for it.

The beauty of writing goals according to a SMART goals template is that it can be applied to your personal or professional life.

If it’s your job to establish goals for your team, then you know you have a lot of responsibility weighing on your shoulders. The outcome of whether or not your team accomplishes what’s expected of them can be hugely dependant on the goals you set for them. So, naturally, you want to get it right.

On a personal level, setting goals for yourself is easy, but actually following through with them is the tricky part. According to a study by Mark Murphy about goal setting, participants who vividly described their goals were 1.2 to 1.4 times more likely to successfully achieve their goals.[2] Which goes to show that if you’re clear about your goals, you can have a higher chance of actually accomplishing them.

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Adhering to a SMART goals template can help you with writing clear goals. So, without further ado, here’s how to write SMART goals with a SMART goals template:

Specific

First and foremost, your goal has to be specific. Be as clear and concise as possible because whether it’s your team or yourself, whoever has to carry out the objective needs to be able to determine exactly what it is they are required to do.

To ensure your goal is as specific as it can be, consider the Ws:

  • Who = who is involved in executing this goal?
  • What = what exactly do I want to accomplish?
  • Where = if there’s a fixed location, where will it happen?
  • When = when should it be done by? (more on deadline under “time-bound”)
  • Why = why do I want to achieve this?

Measurable

The only way to know whether or not your goal was successful is to ensure it is measurable. Adding numbers to a goal can help you or your team weigh up whether or not expectations were met and the outcome was triumphant.

For example, “Go to the gym twice a week for the next six months” is a stronger goal to strive for than simply, “Go to the gym more often”.

Setting milestone throughout your process can also help you to reassess progress as you go along.

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Attainable

The next important thing to keep in mind when using a SMART goals template is to ensure your goal is attainable. It’s great to have big dreams but you want your goals to be within the realms of possibility, so that you have a higher chance of actually accomplishing them.

But that doesn’t mean your goal shouldn’t be challenging. You want your goal to be achievable while at the same time test your skills.

Relevant

For obvious reasons, your goal has to be relevant. It has to align with business objectives or with your personal aspirations or else, what’s the point of doing it?

A SMART goal needs to be applicable and important to you, your team, or your overall business agenda. It needs to be able to steer you forward and motivate you to achieve it, which it can if it holds purpose to something you believe in.

Time-Bound

The last factor of the SMART goals template is time-bound (also known as “timely”). Your goal needs a deadline, because without one, it’s less likely to be accomplished.

A deadline provides a sense of urgency that can motivate you or your team to strive towards the end. The amount of time you allocate should be realistic. Don’t give yourself—or your team—only one week if it takes three weeks to actually complete it. You want to set a challenge but you don’t want to risk over stress or burn out.

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Benefits of Using a SMART Goals Template

Writing your goals following a SMART goals template provides you with a clearer focus. It communicates what the goal needs to achieve without any fuss.

With a clear aim, it can give you a better idea of what success is supposed to look like. It also makes it easier to monitor progress, so you’re aware whether or not you’re on the right path.

It can also make it easier to identify bottlenecks or missed targets while you’re delivering the goal. This gives you enough time to rectify any problems so you can get back on track.

The Bottom Line

Writing goals is seemingly not a difficult thing to do. However, if you want it to be as effective as it can be, then there’s more to it than meets the eye.

By following a SMART goals template, you can establish a more concrete foundation of goal setting. It will ensure your goal is specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound—attributes that cover the necessities of an effectively written goal.

More Tips About Goals Setting

Featured photo credit: Estée Janssens via unsplash.com

Reference

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