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10 Things High Achievers Don’t Do

10 Things High Achievers Don’t Do

High achievers have high ambitions; they live above situations and never rest on their laurels. They are deeply motivated and follow a set of habits that will drive them to achievements. It is not about settling, it is about going the extra mile to make a lasting impression on everyone else. Here are ten things high achievers don’t do.

They don’t listen to conventional thinking

Most times people may not find this an appealing quality as they find more delight in approaching problems through unconventional paths. They ignore popular advice and channels and take the ideal route that not only appeals to them but assures them of the needed result.

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They don’t associate with underachievers

CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg never fails to thank his teammates for the progress they make as a unit. In order to get more done, achievers do not keep company with underachievers. They understand that success is not only in people but being with the right kind of people. Connections to people of like-minds offer them the needed growth to accomplish their pursuits.

They don’t swing with mediocrity

They commit themselves to excellence and follow through on a goal. According to Vince Lombardi, commitment to excellence is proportional to the quality of one’s life. It is not about your area of expertise, following the path of an achiever requires consistency and an intolerance of mediocrity. Every high achiever is not satisfied with a below par performance because they know how impacting excellence can be.

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They don’t wait for answers

While others will procrastinate, sit down and wait for the moment to be right, achievers go at a goal even when they may seemingly not be ready for the success. They don’t wait for answers, they don’t sit down to do nothing, but rather they get to work daily. They are willing to brainstorm, troubleshoot and get on with whatever will see an answer to a problem.

They don’t see success as being enough

While others are lulled after a particular success or a certain accomplishment, the high achiever sees an accomplishment only as a stepping stone to move to the next climb. He knows that one success is not enough to quench his taste for more success. High achievers do not mind re-inventing or repositioning themselves to make sure they reach the next success.

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They don’t dwell on setbacks

Setbacks can be experienced every now and then. But for the high achiever, failure and obstacle will only trigger their desire to keep pushing. They see setbacks as a part of the process of winning and accomplishing something great.

They don’t clutter their lives

They know how to manage their lives to avoid distractions and focused only on what is at hand. They prioritize. They do not jump aimlessly from one project to another. And if certain things are altering their productivity, they terminate it and concentrate on what will offer them the most obtainable results now.

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They don’t get bored

They pursue their passion, something that excites and interests them. The challenge is always fun to them. It spurs them and it is more like a religion to get their desires attained. This drive will also inspire others to flow in their direction and help them accomplish their dreams.

They don’t wait for opportunities

Waiting for opportunities is like waiting for the rain to pour. They don’t wait rather they make their own rain. Counting and waiting for the right time, event and everything to fall into place hinders the process of getting what they want.

They don’t stay in bed late

Every high achiever wakes up early. They know a lot can be done within those few hours before dawn. Waking up early affords some productivity time to stay ahead of competition. From media mogul Oprah Winfrey, to CEO of Apple, they stay on top of their game by waking up early.

Featured photo credit: http://www.flickr.com via flickr.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on March 31, 2020

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How often do you find yourself procrastinating? Do you wish you could procrastinate less? We all know how debilitating procrastination can make us feel, and it seems to be a challenge we all share. Procrastination is one of the biggest hindrances to moving forward and doing the things that we want to in life.

There are many reasons why you might be procrastinating, and sometimes, it is really difficult to pinpoint why. You might be procrastinating because of something related to the past, present, or future (they are all intertwined), or it could be as simple as biological factors. Whatever the reason, most of us follow a cycle when we procrastinate, from the moment we decide to do something to actually getting it done, or in this case, not getting it done.

The Vicious Procrastination Cycle

For some reason, it helps to understand that we all go through the same thing, even though we often feel like the only person in the world who struggles with this. Do you resonate with the cycle below?

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it!

2. Apprehension Starts to Come Up

The beginning stages of optimism are starting to fade. There is still time, but you haven’t done anything yet, and you start to feel uneasy. You realize that you actually have to do something to get it done, and that good intentions are not enough.

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3. Still No Action

More time has passed. You still haven’t taken any action and probably have a lot of excuses why. You start to panic a little and wish you had started sooner. Your panic starts to turn into frustration and perhaps even irritability.

4. Flicker of Hope Left

You can still make it; there is a little time left and you ponder how you are going to get it done. The rush you get from leaving your task until the last minute gives you a flicker of hope. There is still time; you can do this!

5. Fading Quickly

Your hope starts to quickly fade as you try desperately to understand why you just can’t do this. You may feel desperate and have thoughts like, “What is wrong with me?” and “Why do I ALWAYS do this?” You feel discouraged, or perhaps angry and resentful at yourself.

6. Vow to Yourself

Once the feeling of anger or disappointment disappears, you most likely swear to yourself that this will never happen again; that this was the last time and next time will be different.

Does this sound like you? Is the next time different? I understand the devastating effect that procrastination has on many lives, and for some, it is a really serious problem. You also have, on the other hand, those who procrastinate but it doesn’t affect them in any way. You know whether it is affecting you or not and whether it undermines your results.

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How to Break the Procrastination Cycle

Unless you break the cycle, you will keep reinforcing it!

To break the cycle, you need to change the sequence of events. Here is my suggestion on how you can effectively break the vicious cycle you are in!

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it! The first stage is always the same.

2. Plan

Thinking alone will not help; you need to plan your actions. I always put my deadlines one or two days in advance because you know Murphy’s Law! Take into consideration everything that you need to do, how long it will take you, and what you will need to get it done, then plan the individual steps.

3. Resistance

Just because you planned doesn’t mean that this time is guaranteed to be different. You will most likely still feel the resistance so expect this. This stage is key to identifying why you are procrastinating, so when you feel the resistance, try to identify it immediately.

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What is causing you to hesitate in this moment? What do you feel?  Write them down if it helps.

4. Confront Those Feelings

Once you have identified what could possibly be holding you back, for example, fear of failure, lack of motivation, etc. You need to work on lessening the resistance.

Ask yourself, “What do I need to do to move forward? What would make it easier?” If you find that you fear something, overcoming that fear is not something that will happen overnight — keep this in mind.

5. Put Results Before Comfort

You need to keep moving forward and put results before comfort. Take action, even if it is only for 10 minutes. The key is to break the cycle and not reinforce it. You have more control that you think.

6. Repeat

Repeat steps 3-5 until you achieve what you first set out to do.

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Final Thoughts

Change doesn’t happen overnight, and if you have some deeper underlying reasons why you procrastinate, it may take longer to finally break the cycle.

If procrastination is holding you back in life, it is better to deal with it now than to deal with the negative consequences later on. It is not a question of comfort anymore; it is a question of results. What is more important to you?

Learn more about how to stop procrastinating here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

Featured photo credit: Luke Chesser via unsplash.com

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