Advertising
Advertising

10 Reasons Why You Should Spend Time On Your Own

10 Reasons Why You Should Spend Time On Your Own

We spend most of our daily lives with other people, being mother or father, sister or brother, friend or neighbor, wife or husband, employee or colleague. There are so many roles we have to play. The day is filled with different responsibilities and duties, and it is getting harder to find time for yourself. It is so easy to forget about yourself in daily rush.

Enjoying life and being successful starts with having a good relationship with yourself. Spending time with yourself, noticing your best parts and weaknesses is a chance to see the light within and around, to move forward to what you really want.

Here are some reasons why you should remember yourself and sometimes say NO to others and YES to yourself.

Advertising

1.  Stop the daily rush.

Being alone and doing something for yourself is a great way to stop the daily rush. No matter what it is—having a nice cup of coffee, having a long walk in woods, sitting on the bench in a park and looking at the sun, fishing, cooking—whatever makes you feel happy and smile.  Just take a pause of daily habits and give yourself the true gift of being alive.

2. Calm your mind.

Your mind is always busy with duties, responsibilities and worries. You stress about being on time, what to cook for dinner, planning your next trip, or gives you need to buy. The list is endless. When you are alone and your thoughts are about how to make yourself happy or how to enjoy time and smile, worries and never-ending thoughts begin to disappear. And when you come back to those things you can really enjoy doing them. You can see new, unusual solutions, you can admit that sometimes things resolve themselves, and the only thing you have to do is to let them be, to let them go and let Universe deal with it.

3. Set up new goals and see how to achieve them.

During your alone time, you can think about your dreams, set up new goals, see what you really want in your life and make a plan with clear steps to achieve them.

Advertising

4. Notice your true feelings and get to know yourself better.

Wearing different kinds of masks is like hiding your true being and not being honest to yourself and others. When you are alone, you can notice your true feelings—exhaustion, tiredness, stress, insecurity, happiness—whatever it is, it is good to know them to be able to change within.

5. Listen to your inner voice.

When your mind is calm, when there is no rush, you can hear your inner voice. You have time to listen to yourself, to discover your dreams, to believe in yourself and focus on your beauty.

6. Feel grateful.

When you are alone, it is easier to feel grateful. When you stop your daily rush and step out of the daily duties and never-ending needs, you can take some time and look at your life and see how many things you have.  Appreciate your life and smile. Say thank you. Being grateful has a subtle energy and the more often you feel it, the more calmer you will be, and greater things will happen in your life.

Advertising

7. Connect with nature.

Spending time in nature, receiving and enjoying the harmony, tranquility and oneness of it, you fill yourself with pure energies. It helps you to balance your feelings and it cleanses your thoughts. Nature heals you.

8. Renew your energy.

It is a time to renew your inner energy, to recharge yourself.

9. Love yourself.

Giving yourself some alone time is the best way of loving yourself.  Love within creates more love outside you and gives you what you want in the best way possible.

Advertising

10. Have faith.

When you have spent time with yourself, filled yourself with energy, smiled, felt grateful, and nourished your soul with nature, your faith in yourself, in life, and in the universe will grow. You will have faith that you can achieve anything, faith in your own success. Anything and everything is possible.

To find time for alone, to think what to do and spend some time with yourself is a brave step. It is always a challenge to be who you are. But there is always a question at the end of the day—did you really enjoy your day? Is there anything you want to do but can’t find time for?

What you will do next weekend?

May each day be the day you were reborn in silence and faith!

More by this author

8 Reasons Why We Find It Hard To Realize Happiness Life Lessons From These 16 Inspiring Movies You Must Watch Before Age 40 Calm Your Mind and Open Your Soul 10 Things People Who Truly Love Their Lives Do Differently 10 Reasons to be True to Yourself

Trending in Productivity

1Forget Learning How to Multitask: Boost Productivity 10X More with Focus 2How to Organize Your Thoughts: 3 Simple Steps to 10X Your Productivity 3How to Be Productive: 11 Ways to Be Productive and Happy at Once 4Top 10 Productivity Tips to Achieve More and Create Peace of Mind 5How to Declutter Your Mind to Sharpen Your Brain and Fall Asleep Faster

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Forget Learning How to Multitask: Boost Productivity 10X More with Focus

Forget Learning How to Multitask: Boost Productivity 10X More with Focus

There’s a dark side to the conveniences of the Digital Age. With smartphones that function like handheld computers, it has become increasingly difficult to leave our work behind. Sometimes it seems like we’re expected to be accessible 24/7.

How often are you ever focused on just one thing? Most of us try to meet these demands by multi-tasking.

Many of us have bought into the myth that we can achieve more through multi-tasking. In this article, I’ll show you how you can accomplish more work in less time. Spoiler alert: multi-tasking is not the answer.

Why is multitasking a myth?

The term “multi-tasking” was originally used to describe how microprocessors in computers work. Machines multitask, but people cannot.

Despite our inability to simultaneously perform two tasks at once, many people believe they are excellent multi-taskers.

You can probably imagine plenty of times when you do several things at once. Maybe you talk on the phone while you’re cooking or respond to emails during your commute.

Consider the amount of attention that each of these tasks requires. Chances are, at least one of the two tasks in question is simple enough to be carried out on autopilot.

We’re okay at simultaneously performing simple tasks, but what if you were trying to perform two complex tasks? Can you really work on your presentation and watch a movie at the same time? It can be fun to try to watch TV while you work, but you may be unintentionally making your work more difficult and time-consuming.

Your brain on multi-tasking

Your brain wasn’t designed to multi-tasking. To compensate, it will switch from task to task. Your focus turns to whatever task seems more urgent. The other task falls into the background until you realize you’ve been neglecting it.

When you’re bouncing back and forth like this, an area of the brain known as Broadmann’s Area 10 activates. Located in your fronto-polar prefrontal cortex at the very front of the brain, this area controls your ability to shift focus. People who think they are excellent multitaskers are really just putting Broadmann’s Area 10 to work.

Advertising

But I can juggle multiple tasks!

You are capable of taking in information with your eyes while doing other things efficiently. Scientifically speaking, making use of your vision is the only thing you can truly do while doing something else.

For everything else, you’re serial tasking. This constant refocusing can be exhausting, and it prevents us from giving our work the deep attention it deserves.

Think about how much longer it takes to do something when you have to keep reminding yourself to focus.

Why multitasking is failing you

Multitasking does more bad than good to your productivity, here’re 4 reasons why you should stop multitasking:

Multitasking wastes your time.

You lose time when you interrupt yourself. People lose an average of 2.1 hours per day getting themselves back on track when they switch between tasks.

In fact, some studies suggest that doing multiple things at once decreases your productivity by as much as 40%. That’s a significant loss in efficiency. You wouldn’t want your surgeon to be 40% less productive while you’re on the operating table, would you?

It makes you dumber.

A distracted brain performs a full 10 IQ points lower than a focused brain. You’ll also be more forgetful, slower at completing tasks, and more likely to make mistakes.

You’ll have to work harder to fix your mistakes. If you miss an important detail, you could risk injury or fail to complete the task properly.

This is an emotional response.

There’s so much data suggesting that multitasking is ineffective but people insist that they can multitask.

Advertising

Feeling productive fulfills an emotional need. We want to feel like we’re accomplishing something. Why accomplish just one item on the to-do list when you can check off two or three?

It’ll wear you out.

When you’re jumping from task to task, it can feel invigorating for a little while. Over time, this needs to fill every second with more and more work leads to burn out.

We’re simply not built to multitask, so when we try, the effect can be exhausting. This destroys your productivity and your motivation.

How to stop multitasking and work productively

Flitting back and forth between tasks feels second-nature after a while. This is in part because Broadmann’s Area 10 becomes better at serial tasking through time.

In addition to changing how the brain works, this serial tasking behavior can quickly turn into a habit.

Just like any bad habit, you’ll need to recognize that you need to make a change first. Luckily, there are a few simple things you can do to adjust to a lifestyle of productive mono-tasking:

1. Consciously change gears

Instead of trying to work on two distinct tasks at once, consider setting up a system to remind you when to change focus. This technique worked for Jerry Linenger, an American astronaut onboard the space station, Mir.

As an astronaut, he had many things to take care of every day. He set alarms for himself on a few watches. When a particular watch sounded, he knew it was time to switch tasks. This enabled him to be 100% in tune with what he was doing at any given moment.

This strategy is effective because the alarm served as his reminder for what was to come next. Linenger’s intuition about setting reminders falls in line with research conducted by Paul Burgess of University College, London on multitasking.

2. Manage multiple tasks without multitasking

Raj Dash of Performancing.com has an effective strategy for balancing multiple projects without multitasking. He suggests taking 15 minutes to acquaint yourself with a new project before moving on to other work. Revisit the project later and do about thirty minutes on research and brainstorming.

Advertising

Allow a few days to pass before knocking out the project in question. While you were actively work on other projects, your brain continues to problem solve-in the background.

This method works because it gives us the opportunity to work on several projects without allowing them to compete for your attention.

3. Set aside distractions

Your smartphone, your inbox and the open tabs on your computer are all open invitations for distraction. Give yourself time each day when you silence your notifications, close your inbox and remove unnecessary tabs from your desktop.

If you want to focus, you can’t give anything else an opportunity to invade your mental space.

Emails can be particularly invasive because they often have an unnecessary sense of urgency associated with them. Some work cultures stress the importance of prompt responses to these messages, but we can’t treat every situation like an emergency.

Designate certain times in your day for checking and responding to emails to avoid compulsive checking.

4. Take care of yourself

We often blame electronics for pulling us from our work, but sometimes our physical body forces us into a state of serial tasking. If you’re hungry while you’re trying to work, your attention will flip between your hunger and your work until you take care of your physical needs.

Try to take all your bio-breaks before you sit down for an uninterrupted stint of work.

In addition, you’ll also want to be sure you’re attending to your health in a broader sense. Getting enough exercise, practicing mindfulness and incorporating regular breaks into your day will keep you from being tempted by distractions.

5. Take a break

People are more likely to head to YouTube or check their social media when they need a break. Instead of trying to work and watch a mindless video at the same time, give yourself times when you’re allowed to enjoy your distracting activity of choice.

Advertising

Limit how much time you’ll spend on this break so that your guilt-free distraction time doesn’t turn into hours of wasted time.

6. Make technology your ally

Scientists are beginning to discover the detrimental effects of chronic serial tasking on our brains. Some companies are developing programs to curb this desire to multitask.

Apps like Forest turn staying focused into a game. Extensions like RescueTime help you track your online habits so that you can be more aware of how you spend your time.

The key to productivity: Focus

Multitasking is not the key to productivity. It’s far better to schedule time to focus on each task than it is to try to do everything at once.

Make use of the methods outlined above and prepare to be more effective and less exhausted in the process.

If you want to learn more about how to focus, don’t miss my other article:

How to Focus and Maximize Your Productivity (the Definitive Guide)

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Read Next