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10 Incredible Things You Learn From Writing Every Day

10 Incredible Things You Learn From Writing Every Day

The art of writing is my prevailing passion. Expressing the right words in your writing can make all the difference in the world. Choosing the best words can enhance rationality, pace, attraction, sensation and individual expression of your message. That is the reason behind my love for writing.

However, passion by itself won’t achieve results unless you put some extra effort to achieve it. So last year, I took a step forward to finally pursue my dream of writing. The first thing I learnt during following my passion, and would advise everyone to follow is establishing a habit of writing daily, as writing skills only come through a daily practice.

It wasn’t easy until I started to write things like this article daily, the one you’re reading now, and I am learning a new thing every day. There are many incredible things that you learn from writing every day. Here are some of the surprising general benefits of writing daily I’ve learned so far. I hope they will help in discovering your writing passion.

1. Passion is crucial

I think everyone is talented and capable of writing well in a unique fashion. The way that effective writers distinguish themselves is by finding passion in their work. They find writing like any other job or task. If you want to be a good writer and want to learn about writing, then you should hold yourself accountable for this job it has to become a priority in your life.

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2.  Writing something bad adds up to something greater

One of the biggest challenges a beginner writer faces is building confidence in themself and overcoming self-doubt of writing something wrong.  Being a writer, you must understand that nothing is ever perfect in the first stage.

If you want to learn about writing, ignore all those doubts in your head telling you to remove what you’ve written. Move on, ignore the hesitation and attempt to improve. Writing something, even if you know nothing about the topic. By keeping yourself determined, you will see exceptional results.

3.  A little bit each day drives success

Writing a little each day can help you in building your momentum of writing with an attitude of gratitude for the new prospects. If you want to be a good writer, you need to understand that writing is not something that comes with expertise. Rather—in my experience—it comes with experiencing things, paying close attention to details and perceiving activities, interactions, and then expressing them by writing it down.

You should be writing during gaps of your normal day, like writing for a few minutes after you wake up—before making breakfast, or writing during your lunch break. You can even put down some thoughts and observations at night that you noticed during the day. Writing a little everyday would improve your writing in a better way than writing a lot once a week.

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4. People might actually read your stuff

This is something that confuses me. I always think before sharing my newest pieces friends and family, but sharing with them to read what I write is mostly like pulling teeth.

Now-a-days sharing mediums like social media allows you to see how many “views” and “shares” each piece is getting. Don’t be surprised if your colleague or a friend comes up to you saying that they read your article.

5. People might never read your stuff

Always remember the truth that most people simply don’t care what you have to say or readers might never mention your article, or hit “like”, leave a comment, or share your article. However, if your writing is decent and consistent, you will soon find an audience. Keep writing and sharing, and there are chances that you might raise this primarily small audience into larger.

6. People might dislike what you write

This is pretty understandable; if you write something, there will be some people who will simply dislike your stories. But, don’t get disappointed because everybody has different taste in literature. You will need to read the mind of your audience, but this takes time. But after getting few bad reviews or negative comments, do not assume that everybody will dislike what you write. They will only hold you back. You will learn, and this will lead you to more successful writer. 

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7. Some people will dislike your writing style

This one is a little difficult to digest for a new writer. Sharing your writing out for people to see, critique, and criticize is frightening—a bad analysis or negative comment can lower your confidence. Don’t let it happen! Never let them hold you back from writing new things.

8. Selecting visuals in content is crucial

Nowadays modern readers love to see multimedia accompanying the content. Most popular online articles are consisting of videos, pictures or a GIF. Always remember to give credit to the original author of that graphic or picture if you can find one. It would be an embarrassing situation if one of your article readers the one who is the photographer of the picture you used without permission.

9. Read more

This factor is among the most important things that a writer must consider, because it directly influence your writing skills. To be a good writer, you must read every day and your reading should include everything—from horror to romance.

This is essential for your research as an artist. There are many resources available for reading, like free online e-books, and there are public libraries everywhere.

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10. You will start building momentum

It might take weeks, or years to achieve the mark. But ultimately, your writing will get momentum. Similar to every other skill, writing takes a lot of devotion and determination.

But at the end, the hard work and long hours at the computer will give you immense success.

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Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on July 13, 2020

How Not to Feel Overwhelmed at Work & Take Control of Your Day

How Not to Feel Overwhelmed at Work & Take Control of Your Day

Overwhelm is a pernicious state largely caused by the ever-increasing demands on our time and the distractions that exist all around us. It creeps up on us and can, in its extreme form, leave us feeling anxious, stressed and exhausted.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed at work, here are 6 strategies you can follow that will reduce the feeling of overwhelm; leaving you calmer, in control and a lot less stressed.

1. Write Everything down to Offload Your Mind

The first thing you can do when you begin to feel overwhelmed is to write everything down that is on your mind.

Often people just write down all the things they think they have to do. This does help, but a more effective way to reduce overwhelm is to also write down everything that’s on your mind.

For example, you may have had an argument with your colleague or a loved one. If it’s on your mind write it down. A good way to do this is to draw a line down the middle of the page and title one section “things to do” and the other “what’s on my mind”.

The act of writing all this down and getting it out of your head will begin the process of removing your feeling of overwhelm. Writing things down can really change your life.

2. Decide How Long It Will Take to Complete Your To-Dos

Once you have ‘emptied your head,’ go through your list and estimate how long it will take to complete each to-do.

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As you go through your list, you will find quite a few to-dos will only take you five or ten minutes. Others will take longer, often up to several hours.

Do not worry about that at this stage. Just focus on estimating how long you will need to complete each task to the best of your ability. Here’s How to Cultivate a More Meaningful To Do List.

3. Take Advantage of Parkinson’s Law

Now here’s a little trick I learned a long time ago. Parkinson’s Law states that work will fill the time you have available to complete it, and us humans are terrible at estimating how long something will take:((Odhable: Genesis of Parkinson’s Law))

    This is why many people are always late. They think it will only take them thirty minutes to drive across town when previous experience has taught them it usually takes forty-five minutes to do so because traffic is often bad but they stick to the belief it will only take thirty minutes. It’s more wishful thinking than good judgment.

    We can use Parkinson’s Law to our advantage. If you have estimated that to write five emails that desperately need a reply to be ninety minutes, then reduce it down to one hour. Likewise, if you have estimated it will take you three hours to prepare your upcoming presentation, reduce it down to two hours.

    Reducing the time you estimate something will take gives you two advantages. The first is you get your work done quicker, obviously. The second is you put yourself under a little time pressure and in doing so you reduce the likelihood you will be distracted or allow yourself to procrastinate.

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    When we overestimate how long something will take, subconsciously our brains know we have plenty of time and so it plays tricks on us and we end up checking reviews of the Apple Watch 4 or allow our colleagues to interrupt us with the latest office gossip.

    Applying a little time pressure prevents this from happening and we get more focused and more work done.

    4. Use the Power of Your Calendar

    Once you have your time estimates done, open up your calendar and schedule your to-dos. Go through your to-dos and schedule time on your calendar for doing those tasks. Group tasks up into similar tasks.

    For emails that need attention on your to-do list, schedule time on your calendar to deal with all your emails at once. Likewise, if you have a report to write or a presentation to prepare, add these to your calendar using your estimated time as a guide for how long each will take.

    Seeing these items on your calendar eases your mind because you know you have allocated time to get them done and you no longer feel you have no time. Grouping similar tasks together keeps you in a focused state longer and it’s amazing how much work you get done when you do this.

    5. Make Decisions

    For those things you wrote down that are on your mind but are not tasks, make a decision about what you will do with each one. These things are on your mind because you have not made a decision about them.

    If you have an issue with a colleague, a friend or a loved one, take a little time to think about what would be the best way to resolve the problem. More often than not just talking with the person involved will clear the air and resolve the problem.

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    If it is a more serious issue, then decide how best to deal with it. Talk to your boss, a colleague and get advice.

    Whatever you do, do not allow it to fester. Ignoring the problem will not make it go away. You need to make a decision to deal with it and the sooner you do so the sooner the problem will be resolved. (You can take a look at this guide on How To Make Good Decisions All The Time.)

    I remember long ago, when I was in my early twenties and had gone mad with my newly acquired credit cards. I discovered I didn’t have the money to pay my monthly bills. I worried about it for days, got stressed and really didn’t know what to do. Eventually, I told a good friend of mine of the problem. He suggested I called the credit card company to explain my problem. The next day, I plucked up the courage to call the company, explained my problem and the wonderful person the other end listened and then suggested I paid a smaller amount for a couple of months.

    This one phone call took no more than ten minutes to make, yet it solved my problem and took away a lot of the stress I was feeling at the time. I learned two very valuable lessons from that experience:

    The first, don’t go mad with newly acquired credit cards! And the second, there’s always a solution to every problem if you just talk to the right person.

    6. Take Some Form of Action

    Because overwhelm is something that creeps up on us, once we feel overwhelmed (and stressed as the two often go together), the key is to take some form of action.

    The act of writing everything down that is bothering you and causing you to feel overwhelmed is a great place to start. Being able to see what it is that is bothering you in a list form, no matter how long that list is, eases the mind. You have externalized it.

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    It also means rather than these worries floating around in a jumbled mess inside your head, they are now visible and you can make decisions easier about what to do about them. Often it could be asking a colleague for a little help, or it could be you see you need to allocate some focused time to get the work done. The important thing is you make a decision on what to do next.

    Overwhelm is not always caused by a feeling of having a lack of time or too much work, it can also be caused by avoiding a decision about what to do next.

    The Bottom Line

    Make a decision, even if it is to just talk to someone about what to do next. Making a decision about how you will resolve something on its own will reduce your feelings of overwhelm and start you down the path to a resolution one way or another.

    When you follow these strategies to can say goodbye to your overwhelm and gain much more control over your day.

    More Tips for Reducing Work Stress

    Featured photo credit: Andrei Lazarev via unsplash.com

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