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7 Foods For Teeth That Your Dentist Wants You To Eat More Often

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7 Foods For Teeth That Your Dentist Wants You To Eat More Often

Has your dentist ever given you tips for what foods that you should or shouldn’t be eating? Better yet, have they ever given you the reasons that certain foods are beneficial to the health of your teeth and gums?

Sure, many of us have heard that certain foods like sugar, sticky foods and processed food are “bad” for our teeth, but have we heard of the many foods that are “good” for our teeth, or the ones that help control disease in the mouth?

Mother Nature got it right on many levels, and going back to basics with whole foods for teeth can really benefit the health of your mouth; but there happen to be a number of foods (some perhaps surprising) that when eaten more often, not only will help keep your dentist happy, but will help keep your pocketbook happier too.

Yes, food choices can tip the scale in regards to disease in your mouth and below are some choices that may have you spending less money on dental bills than ever before.

1. Cheese

According to a study published in the May/June 2013 issue of General Dentistry,  consuming cheese and other dairy products may help protect teeth against cavities.

Various compounds found in cheese may adhere to tooth enamel and help further protect teeth from acid.

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Eat cheese at the end of a meal or as a snack to coat the teeth and neutralize the acids formed from eating carbohydrates.

2. Plain yogurt (preferably full fat or Greek)

Yogurt helps gums stay healthy, it strengthens teeth, it helps to balance the acids in the mouth and it also helps to fight bad breath.  Basically, yogurt is a dental super food!

A Japanese study of 1,000 adults revealed that the healthiest gums were found in those who ate the most yogurt.  Probiotics, (the good bacteria) found in yogurt are the possible reason because these active cultures may help to slow the growth of cavity-causing bacteria.  Cavity-causing bacteria love an acidic mouth.

Yogurt counters this attack by balancing your mouth’s pH levels, and creating an environment where bacteria have a hard time surviving.  Also, yogurt is high in calcium which helps to keep your teeth strong.

Eating six ounces of yogurt each day is recommended for the control of bad breath.

The best yogurts for dental health are plain and Greek yogurts because they often contain the highest amount of probiotics.

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If you or your children crave sweet yogurt, you might want to add a small amount of fresh fruit or a natural sweetener like xylitol (see below).  Recently, there are a few preserves and jams that contain xylitol instead of sugar and work as a safe and sweet addition to plain (non flavored) yogurt.

3. Apples

Apples are not only good for your teeth, but they also act as a breath freshener.

The natural fibers present in the skin and the flesh of the apple helps to scrub your tongue and gums, and help to remove much of the plaque that is responsible for bad breath.

Also, they have a astringent quality that helps to get rid of plaque (Granny Smith apples work best).  Eating apples also helps to remove stain on your teeth from coffee and other staining drinks.

4. Broccoli

Broccoli does two things that benefit the teeth.  It helps to keep them whiter, and the iron found in broccoli helps to form an acid-resistant barrier that can protect the enamel of your teeth.

Broccoli is rich in vitamin C, and vitamin E, which helps aid the body in healing.  It is a good source of calcium, vitamin B2 and folic acid (which can help prevent spina bifida in babies if consumed by pregnant women).

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The secret to broccoli and whiter teeth, is to eat the florets.  Raw is the best method for eating, because the crunchiness also gets the saliva flowing.  The best way to cook broccoli is to steam it because boiling broccoli for too long can cause all the vitamins and nutrients to be lost.

5. Pineapple

According to Dr. Ellie Phillips DDS, in the 1970s, she used to work in a dental office in Switzerland that recommended patients eat pineapple before and after their wisdom teeth were extracted. This intrigued her, so she began studying the effects of pineapple and its wonders to the mouth.

You would think with a fruit like pineapple and its acidity that it would be a no go for this list, but pineapple is one of the citrus fruits that actually alkalize the mouth (along with Granny Smith apples)!  Pineapple is the only fruit that contains an enzyme called Bromelain. Bromelain has become recognized for its health benefits and is useful in medical treatments for a number of ailments and diseases. In the mouth, it helps to reduce inflammation and help with healing.

Also, pineapple contains vitamins K, C and other substances that promote healing.  Many people claim that pineapple also helps tooth sensitivity, and according to Dr. Shawn Frawley DDS, he also states that bromelain acts as a natural stain remover, and it also helps to break up plaque.

6. Xylitol

Xylitol is sweet like sugar, but when it comes to bacteria, it has the exact opposite effect.  Fear not; xylitol is not a chemical, artificial sweetener. It is a naturally occurring sweetener found in birch trees and corn, and our bodies produce it daily (around 15 grams).  Xylitol has a very interesting story behind it, and there are so many dental benefits to xylitol there could be an entire article written about this product alone.

Xylitol does not break down and feed plaque like regular sugar.  Instead it tricks the plaque into thinking it is food, yet it delivers no nutrients to the plaque and essentially starves the plaque so that it can no longer survive and thrive.

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Typically carbohydrates (and sugars) feed the bacteria in the mouth, the result is an acidic spike in the mouth for 20 minutes after eating or drinking sugars and carbs.  Xylitol also helps to immediately neutralize the acids in the mouth and it helps to increase saliva (great for dry mouth sufferers).

Having xylitol at the end of each of your meals will take away acidity and put minerals into the tooth surface. In order to receive the benefits of xylitol (also referred to as “therapeutic dosing”), it is recommended to ingest 6–10 grams (1–2 teaspoons) throughout the day.

Having a bit after each meal and a teaspoon in your morning’s water will help you satisfy the recommended daily “therapeutic” dose.

Xylitol is available in many forms such as sugar-free gum, candies, mints, lollipops, caramels, chocolate and granules which look and act like table sugar.  If you are using xylitol to bake or cook with, the ratio is an equal 1:1.

These simple steps will not only improve the health of your mouth, they just might also help you realize how easy it can be to stop cavities and prevent gum disease from getting out of control.  Both cavities and gum disease are bacterial infections that can be avoided with simple changes in both the foods you eat and the way you use your home care products as well!

Lifehacking your oral health routine could be the best change you make for the health of your mouth as well as the health of your body.

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Last Updated on December 7, 2021

World’s 15 Weirdest Museums You Must Visit

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World’s 15 Weirdest Museums You Must Visit

When we think about culture one of the first things that come to mind are museums – it is ingrained in our collective consciousness that we need to visit a few museums when vacationing abroad, so we can then feel free to indulge in hedonistic pleasures because we’ve bowed at the altar of culture first. However, not all museums are created equal. While some may have your standard collections of classic artwork, statues and pottery fragments, there are a lot of unconventional and even fairly quirky museums around the world. If you like to travel and want to experience something new and truly unique, to be awed, then be sure to visit some of the following museums on your next vacation.

1. Cancun Underwater Museum

Let’s start off the list with something entirely different. The Cancun Underwater Museum boasts hundreds of beautiful sculptures such as “The Silent Evolution”, a huge crowd of people, and “Inertia”, a fat man sitting on a couch in front of the TV. These sculptures would evoke powerful emotions regardless of their location; however, being situated underwater gives them an air of mysticism and an almost unnerving calm. The marine flora and fauna has already become one with some of the sculptures, making the whole site look like the sunken remnants of an ancient civilization.

2. Paris Sewers Museum

We all admire the grand architecture of famous cities, particularly one as iconic as Paris, the city of romance and art. What people seldom stop to look at is the complex labyrinth that is the Paris sewer system. It is an entire network of tunnels as large as the city itself and it is also a museum that tourists can visit and explored, complete with tour guides. It doesn’t smell as bad as you’d think, so if you ever find yourself in Paris and have about an hour or so of time to kill, this is definitely an interesting option.

3. Franz Kafka Museum in Prague

A man with a dark and near dreamlike vision of the modern world, where bureaucracy, alienation, lack of empathy and human suffering are the order of the day, Franz Kafka is rightfully considered one of the greatest modern writers. The Franz Kafka Museum reflects some of the main themes of the authors works, which Kafka himself wanted his friend to burn after his death, and their unique atmosphere. The weirdest thing about it is probably the sculpture of two men urinating in a pool shaped like the borders of the Czech Republic, which are, for some reason, animatronic and can spell out words in the pool based on SMS messages that people send.

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4. Leila’s Hair Museum in Independence, Missouri

Art has always been very accommodating, allowing artists to choose from a huge range of different mediums and materials from which to create unique designs. That being said, I doubt you’ve ever considered hair as a valid material for creating works of art. Luckily, Leila’s Hair Museum is here to prove you wrong. With thousands of wreaths and various creative jewelry pieces made out of real human hair, which is said to have been popular in the Victorian period. There are multiple pieces containing hair from famous people, including the likes of Queen Victoria.

5. Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography in Saint Petersburg

The Kunstkamera houses Russia’s oldest museum, the Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, which has exhibits ranging from interesting to bizarre and morbid. Peter the Great reportedly wanted to dispel myths about monsters and mythical creatures among his people, so there are plenty of deformed skeletons, jars with fetuses and rarities like two-headed animals. Some of the exhibits are not for those with a weak stomach, but they are definitely unique and rare.

6. Iceland Phallological Museum in Reykjavík

Iceland is known as “The Land of Ice and Fire”, a small and some would say magical island with a long and proud history. It’s no surprise that it would feature a world renowned museum, but what’s unusual about the Phallological Museum is the fact that it is devoted solely to showcasing penis samples from 93 different animal species – including the 67 inch front tip of a blue whale penis and specimens supposedly belonging to mythical creatures like trolls and elves. It definitely offers a unique experience.

7. Meguro Parasite Museum in Tokyo

Many museums feature animal exhibits, showcasing everything from dinosaur bones and large stuffed land mammals to unusual insects, but rarely does a museum focus solely on parasites. The Meguro Parasite Museum takes humanities worst nightmares, lays them before you and provides plenty of information on each and every one. Their motto is “Try to think about parasites without a feeling of fear, and take the time to learn about their wonderful world of the parasites”, and there really is a lot to learn if you can get over the initial feeling of unease.

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8. The Iga Ninja Museum in Mie

Western pop culture has been in love with ninja’s since the 80’s and we have only grown fonder of them with time. If you find this topic intriguing or just want to learn more about the whole ninja phenomenon, then the Iga Ninja Museum is the right place for you. You can see the numerous weapons and tools used by these legendary warriors and enjoy a practical display of some of the traditional techniques and tactics. It is a lot of fun and very informative to boot, great for people of all ages.

9. Bran Castle near Braşov in Transylvania

The name might not sound familiar at first, but the geographical location kind of gives it away – yes, this is the castle of Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia a.k.a. Vlad the Impaler, a.k.a. Count Dracula from the Bram Stalker novel and world-famous horror character. Bran Castle is the only Transylvanian castle that perfectly fits Stokers description of the world’s most famous vampire’s castle and has thus been dubbed Dracula’s Castle. It has been turned into a museum which every horror fan is welcome to visit and explore.

10. Malacca Museum of Enduring Beauty

The nature of beauty is a topic that has troubled mankind for millennia.  Aesthetic preferences and sensibilities have been very different in different regions and at different times, and as fashions changed so too did people try to change themselves to conform to the various ideals of beauty. The Museum of Enduring Beauty showcases the numerous traditions and the jewelry, tools and practices used by peoples the world over to try and make themselves as beautiful as possible. Practices such as foot binding, neck elongation, inserting huge discs into the lips and many others are explained in detail, which gives us an insight into our nature, and perhaps motivates us to see the current standards of beauty for what they really are – an artificially created set of desirable features based on a subjective interpretation of beauty.

11. The Museum of Human Disease in Sydney

Doctors spend years and years in medical school for a good reason – there are a lot of diseases that can plague humans. Some of these are more serious than others, but each one is interesting from a scientific standpoint. The Museum of Human Disease catalogs a huge variety of diseases and their effects on the human body, including the most common causes of death. You can participate in dissection workshops or explore some of the large number of vital organs on display. It is a real eye-opener and highly educational, if somewhat morbid and unusual.

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12. Museum of Medieval Torture Devices in Amsterdam

There are, of course, some parts of our history that we are not exactly proud of, and this includes wars and atrocities like torture. However, it is interesting to see just how creative people of the past centuries have been when it came to thinking up different ways of inflicting pain to fellow humans. If you’ve got a morbid curiosity for this sort of thing, the Museum of Medieval Torture Devices in Amsterdam has a lot to offer you. There are plenty of weird torture devices, complete with images and even sculptures, depicting the various torture methods that were in use, and the courteous staff is more than happy to answer any questions.

13. The Skull Tower of Niš

The Balkans region has had a very turbulent history, particularly in the past few centuries. In the nineteenth century, as Serbians sought to free themselves from their Ottoman oppressors, many battles raged, and one of the most famous was certainly the Battle of Čegar. When the tides of war changed and it became clear that the Turks would win, Serbian commander Stevan Sinđelić sacrificed himself and the remaining Serbian forces in an unprecedented act of bravery, blowing up the gunpowder storage and taking out thousands of enemy soldiers in the process. In order to silence the rebellion and frighten the people, Hurshid Pasha had a ten foot tower built using over 900 skulls of the fallen Serbian soldiers. The original Skull Tower suffered some structural damage over time, and now only 58 skulls remain in the wall, one which is said to belong to Sinđelić himself and is encased in glass. It is a fairly frightening, yet awe inspiring site.

14. Funeral Carriage Museum in Barcelona

Funerals are still somewhat of a taboo topic and it’s certainly something you’d mention in polite society. This is really a shame, since there are plenty of wonderful rituals that have been built around escorting the departed on his way to the afterlife. The vehicles used to transport the deceased have always had a somber tone, but where not without a hint of grandeur, as you can witness by exploring the Funeral Carriage Museum in Barcelona.  The exhibit consists of 13 beautiful funeral carriages and six coaches that were used to transport departed citizens to their eternal resting place.

15. Siriraj Medical Museum in Bangkok

The word “medical” in the name of this museum has surely tipped you off that you are in for something morbid and unusual. It’s not for the faint of heart, but it has a lot to offer. Also known as “The Museum of Death”, you can see everything from the mummified remains of a serial killer and cannibal to a large variety of human skulls and different preserved body parts. There are plenty of interesting examples of fatal injuries in the Forensic wing of the museum, and there is enough material to keep you occupied for several afternoons, if you aren’t squeamish.

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It is good to sometimes break from the mold and look for something a bit more thrilling and unusual than rusted bits of ancient swords, broken pottery and pieces of jewelry. These museums may be a bit weird, morbid or even spooky, but they will not disappoint. If you are an adventurous soul, be sure to check them out.

Featured photo credit: Igor Miske via unsplash.com

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