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Walt Disney Lessons: 10 Magical Ways To Make Your Dreams Come True

Walt Disney Lessons: 10 Magical Ways To Make Your Dreams Come True

Walt Disney was a showman. According to Time, he “received received more Academy Awards and nominations than any other person in history.” The Disneyland theme parks are truly magical kingdoms, for adults, as well as for children.

Here are some Walt Disney lessons in making your dreams come true, courtesy of the master of imagination, dreaming, and achievement himself.

1. Dream Big.

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

– Walt Disney

Dream big

    What if money, time, looks, and gender were no object? What would your biggest dream be? Often we short-change ourselves. We listen to others’ put-downs, and internalize them. It’s hard to remember our dreams. Harder still, to imagine that we could achieve a dream. Take Walt Disney’s words to heart. Start dreaming. Then believe that you can achieve your dream.

    2. Be Courageous.

    “All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.”

    – Walt Disney

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    Courage

      It takes courage to step outside your comfort zone. However, achieving your dreams always means that you’re doing things you’ve never done before. Practice being courageous. Today, do something you haven’t done before. Propose a new project to your boss. Send your crush some flowers. Being courageous doesn’t mean that you’re unafraid. It means acting in spite of your fear.

      3. Be Yourself.

      “The more you like yourself, the less you are like anyone else, which makes you unique.”

      – Walt Disney

      Be yourself

        We all wear masks. We try to be what we think people want us to be. We try to emulate role models. What if you were just yourself? Discovering who you are underneath all the masks is challenging. It’s hard to be authentic if you’re not sure who you are. Just for today, do what pleases you. Say what you mean, rather than saying what you think someone wants to hear. However, be appropriate—being “like yourself” isn’t a license to be outrageous, or to say hurtful things.

        4. Stop Talking. Start Doing.

        “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.”

        – Walt Disney

        Doing

          You’re dreaming big. You’re inspired. You tell everyone about your dream. Stop! Keep it to yourself. Work quietly towards your dream. You don’t need validation from anyone, nor do you need permission. Be authentic, and do something today, which will help you to achieve your dream.

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          5. Embrace Competition.

          “I have been up against tough competition all my life. I wouldn’t know how to get along without it.”

          – Walt Disney

          competition

            Competition is essential to help you to achieve your dreams. If there were no competition, you’d have nothing against which to measure yourself. Competition makes you better and stronger than you might otherwise be. In business, competition fosters innovation. If you’re uncomfortable with competition, or envious of competitors, ask yourself why. Then do the best you can.

            6. Go and Get What You Want. Don’t Wait.

            “Cinderella believed in dreams, all right, but she also believed in doing something about them. When Prince Charming didn’t come along, she went over to the palace and got him.”

            – Walt Disney

            Act

              Forget wishing. No one is handed his dreams for free. You have to fight to achieve a dream. Expect to struggle. Ask yourself what price you’re will to pay—dreams always have a price. However, it’s not all doom and gloom. Setting goals, making plans, and working toward your dream is wonderful. Enjoy the journey. When you’ve achieved a long-held dream, you find that while you appreciate the achievement, the memories of the journey are what make you smile.

              7. Do Your Best Work. Don’t Worry About Money.

              “Do a good job. You don’t have to worry about the money; it will take care of itself. Just do your best work—then try to trump it.”

              – Walt Disney

              Do your best

                You’re poor. You can’t afford to take time off to get another degree so you can get a better job. The answer is to do the best you can, right where you are, and cling onto your dream. Life will give you what you want, when you least expect it: do your best work, every day. Then better your best. As Walt Disney says, “you don’t have to worry about the money.” Results will come.

                8. Don’t Quit.

                “The difference in winning and losing is most often… not quitting.”

                – Walt Disney

                Don't quit

                  You can’t succeed at anything without failing, and failing a lot. Failure is the way we learn. Here’s what Thomas Edison said: “The three great essentials to achieve anything worthwhile are, first, hard work; second, stick-to-itiveness; third, common sense.” Everyone fails his way to success. Look on your failures as speed bumps in your success journey, and keep going. Don’t quit.

                  9. Be Grateful.

                  “The more you are in a state of gratitude, the more you will attract things to be grateful for.”

                  – Walt Disney

                  grateful

                    What are you grateful for? We all have endless reasons to be grateful. What do you take for granted? Chances are that you’re blasé about your health, your comfortable home, your loving family, and about your job. Even if you have none of those things, you can be grateful for being alive. Studies have shown that gratitude improves your health, your relationships, and makes you happier.

                    10. Do Your Best.

                    “Why worry? If you’ve done the very best you can, worrying won’t make it better.”

                    – Walt Disney

                    Why worry

                      Worry is anticipation; worry can help you to improve and do your best. However, once something is done, distract yourself from concern about the results. If you’ve gone through three interviews for a job, there’s nothing else you can do. Worrying about whether you get the job is pointless at that stage. Only worry when it serves a useful purpose.

                      So, there you have ten Walt Disney lessons. Apply them to your life. They’ll help you to make your dreams come true.

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                      Last Updated on August 6, 2020

                      6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

                      6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

                      We’ve all done it. That moment when a series of words slithers from your mouth and the instant regret manifests through blushing and profuse apologies. If you could just think before you speak! It doesn’t have to be like this, and with a bit of practice, it’s actually quite easy to prevent.

                      “Think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” – Napolean Hill

                      Are we speaking the same language?

                      My mum recently left me a note thanking me for looking after her dog. She’d signed it with “LOL.” In my world, this means “laugh out loud,” and in her world it means “lots of love.” My kids tell me things are “sick” when they’re good, and ”manck” when they’re bad (when I say “bad,” I don’t mean good!). It’s amazing that we manage to communicate at all.

                      When speaking, we tend to color our language with words and phrases that have become personal to us, things we’ve picked up from our friends, families and even memes from the internet. These colloquialisms become normal, and we expect the listener (or reader) to understand “what we mean.” If you really want the listener to understand your meaning, try to use words and phrases that they might use.

                      Am I being lazy?

                      When you’ve been in a relationship for a while, a strange metamorphosis takes place. People tend to become lazier in the way that they communicate with each other, with less thought for the feelings of their partner. There’s no malice intended; we just reach a “comfort zone” and know that our partners “know what we mean.”

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                      Here’s an exchange from Psychology Today to demonstrate what I mean:

                      Early in the relationship:

                      “Honey, I don’t want you to take this wrong, but I’m noticing that your hair is getting a little thin on top. I know guys are sensitive about losing their hair, but I don’t want someone else to embarrass you without your expecting it.”

                      When the relationship is established:

                      “Did you know that you’re losing a lot of hair on the back of your head? You’re combing it funny and it doesn’t help. Wear a baseball cap or something if you feel weird about it. Lots of guys get thin on top. It’s no big deal.”

                      It’s pretty clear which of these statements is more empathetic and more likely to be received well. Recognizing when we do this can be tricky, but with a little practice it becomes easy.

                      Have I actually got anything to say?

                      When I was a kid, my gran used to say to me that if I didn’t have anything good to say, I shouldn’t say anything at all. My gran couldn’t stand gossip, so this makes total sense, but you can take this statement a little further and modify it: “If you don’t have anything to say, then don’t say anything at all.”

                      A lot of the time, people speak to fill “uncomfortable silences,” or because they believe that saying something, anything, is better than staying quiet. It can even be a cause of anxiety for some people.

                      When somebody else is speaking, listen. Don’t wait to speak. Listen. Actually hear what that person is saying, think about it, and respond if necessary.

                      Am I painting an accurate picture?

                      One of the most common forms of miscommunication is the lack of a “referential index,” a type of generalization that fails to refer to specific nouns. As an example, look at these two simple phrases: “Can you pass me that?” and “Pass me that thing over there!”. How often have you said something similar?

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                      How is the listener supposed to know what you mean? The person that you’re talking to will start to fill in the gaps with something that may very well be completely different to what you mean. You’re thinking “pass me the salt,” but you get passed the pepper. This can be infuriating for the listener, and more importantly, can create a lack of understanding and ultimately produce conflict.

                      Before you speak, try to label people, places and objects in a way that it is easy for any listeners to understand.

                      What words am I using?

                      It’s well known that our use of nouns and verbs (or lack of them) gives an insight into where we grew up, our education, our thoughts and our feelings.

                      Less well known is that the use of pronouns offers a critical insight into how we emotionally code our sentences. James Pennebaker’s research in the 1990’s concluded that function words are important keys to someone’s psychological state and reveal much more than content words do.

                      Starting a sentence with “I think…” demonstrates self-focus rather than empathy with the speaker, whereas asking the speaker to elaborate or quantify what they’re saying clearly shows that you’re listening and have respect even if you disagree.

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                      Is the map really the territory?

                      Before speaking, we sometimes construct a scenario that makes us act in a way that isn’t necessarily reflective of the actual situation.

                      A while ago, John promised to help me out in a big way with a project that I was working on. After an initial meeting and some big promises, we put together a plan and set off on its execution. A week or so went by, and I tried to get a hold of John to see how things were going. After voice mails and emails with no reply and general silence, I tried again a week later and still got no response.

                      I was frustrated and started to get more than a bit vexed. The project obviously meant more to me than it did to him, and I started to construct all manner of crazy scenarios. I finally got through to John and immediately started a mild rant about making promises you can’t keep. He stopped me in my tracks with the news that his brother had died. If I’d have just thought before I spoke…

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