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Walt Disney Lessons: 10 Magical Ways To Make Your Dreams Come True

Walt Disney Lessons: 10 Magical Ways To Make Your Dreams Come True

Walt Disney was a showman. According to Time, he “received received more Academy Awards and nominations than any other person in history.” The Disneyland theme parks are truly magical kingdoms, for adults, as well as for children.

Here are some Walt Disney lessons in making your dreams come true, courtesy of the master of imagination, dreaming, and achievement himself.

1. Dream Big.

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

– Walt Disney

Dream big

    What if money, time, looks, and gender were no object? What would your biggest dream be? Often we short-change ourselves. We listen to others’ put-downs, and internalize them. It’s hard to remember our dreams. Harder still, to imagine that we could achieve a dream. Take Walt Disney’s words to heart. Start dreaming. Then believe that you can achieve your dream.

    2. Be Courageous.

    “All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.”

    – Walt Disney

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    Courage

      It takes courage to step outside your comfort zone. However, achieving your dreams always means that you’re doing things you’ve never done before. Practice being courageous. Today, do something you haven’t done before. Propose a new project to your boss. Send your crush some flowers. Being courageous doesn’t mean that you’re unafraid. It means acting in spite of your fear.

      3. Be Yourself.

      “The more you like yourself, the less you are like anyone else, which makes you unique.”

      – Walt Disney

      Be yourself

        We all wear masks. We try to be what we think people want us to be. We try to emulate role models. What if you were just yourself? Discovering who you are underneath all the masks is challenging. It’s hard to be authentic if you’re not sure who you are. Just for today, do what pleases you. Say what you mean, rather than saying what you think someone wants to hear. However, be appropriate—being “like yourself” isn’t a license to be outrageous, or to say hurtful things.

        4. Stop Talking. Start Doing.

        “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.”

        – Walt Disney

        Doing

          You’re dreaming big. You’re inspired. You tell everyone about your dream. Stop! Keep it to yourself. Work quietly towards your dream. You don’t need validation from anyone, nor do you need permission. Be authentic, and do something today, which will help you to achieve your dream.

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          5. Embrace Competition.

          “I have been up against tough competition all my life. I wouldn’t know how to get along without it.”

          – Walt Disney

          competition

            Competition is essential to help you to achieve your dreams. If there were no competition, you’d have nothing against which to measure yourself. Competition makes you better and stronger than you might otherwise be. In business, competition fosters innovation. If you’re uncomfortable with competition, or envious of competitors, ask yourself why. Then do the best you can.

            6. Go and Get What You Want. Don’t Wait.

            “Cinderella believed in dreams, all right, but she also believed in doing something about them. When Prince Charming didn’t come along, she went over to the palace and got him.”

            – Walt Disney

            Act

              Forget wishing. No one is handed his dreams for free. You have to fight to achieve a dream. Expect to struggle. Ask yourself what price you’re will to pay—dreams always have a price. However, it’s not all doom and gloom. Setting goals, making plans, and working toward your dream is wonderful. Enjoy the journey. When you’ve achieved a long-held dream, you find that while you appreciate the achievement, the memories of the journey are what make you smile.

              7. Do Your Best Work. Don’t Worry About Money.

              “Do a good job. You don’t have to worry about the money; it will take care of itself. Just do your best work—then try to trump it.”

              – Walt Disney

              Do your best

                You’re poor. You can’t afford to take time off to get another degree so you can get a better job. The answer is to do the best you can, right where you are, and cling onto your dream. Life will give you what you want, when you least expect it: do your best work, every day. Then better your best. As Walt Disney says, “you don’t have to worry about the money.” Results will come.

                8. Don’t Quit.

                “The difference in winning and losing is most often… not quitting.”

                – Walt Disney

                Don't quit

                  You can’t succeed at anything without failing, and failing a lot. Failure is the way we learn. Here’s what Thomas Edison said: “The three great essentials to achieve anything worthwhile are, first, hard work; second, stick-to-itiveness; third, common sense.” Everyone fails his way to success. Look on your failures as speed bumps in your success journey, and keep going. Don’t quit.

                  9. Be Grateful.

                  “The more you are in a state of gratitude, the more you will attract things to be grateful for.”

                  – Walt Disney

                  grateful

                    What are you grateful for? We all have endless reasons to be grateful. What do you take for granted? Chances are that you’re blasé about your health, your comfortable home, your loving family, and about your job. Even if you have none of those things, you can be grateful for being alive. Studies have shown that gratitude improves your health, your relationships, and makes you happier.

                    10. Do Your Best.

                    “Why worry? If you’ve done the very best you can, worrying won’t make it better.”

                    – Walt Disney

                    Why worry

                      Worry is anticipation; worry can help you to improve and do your best. However, once something is done, distract yourself from concern about the results. If you’ve gone through three interviews for a job, there’s nothing else you can do. Worrying about whether you get the job is pointless at that stage. Only worry when it serves a useful purpose.

                      So, there you have ten Walt Disney lessons. Apply them to your life. They’ll help you to make your dreams come true.

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                      Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                      7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                      7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                      When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

                      You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

                      1. Connecting them with each other

                      Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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                      It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

                      2. Connect with their emotions

                      Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

                      For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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                      3. Keep going back to the beginning

                      Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

                      On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

                      4. Link to your audience’s motivation

                      After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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                      Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

                      5. Entertain them

                      While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

                      Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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                      6. Appeal to loyalty

                      Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

                      In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

                      7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

                      Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

                      Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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