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Top 7 Regrets of People Who Are Dying

Top 7 Regrets of People Who Are Dying

A lot of people who pass away do so with many regrets.  Things they wish they did and those they wish they didn’t do. It’s really sad to spend so much of your life doing one thing or the other and have it end with so much pain and sorrow. We all have one shot at life and we ought to make the best of it. We should live our lives so that when we pass, regret won’t plague us on our last days.

Here’re the top regrets of people who are dying and how we can use them to live a more fulfilling life.

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1.  I wish I had lived my own life rather than how society taught me to live.

There are many things society teaches us about the stages of life.  You go to school, get a good job, buy a house, get married, have kids.  While this plan may work for some, it’s certainly not a one-size-fits-all plan.  A lot of people live a life they think should be living according to society, friends, or family and end up with the realization that it was not the life they WANTED to live.  Look around you and figure out what makes you happy, what you’re passionate about and live your own life now.  Do the things that come naturally to you and stop trying to please everyone. “To thine own self be true.”

2.   I wish I discovered my purpose earlier.

People who are dying usually have this regret. The number of years you spend outside your purpose is the number of years you spend living another person’s life. Some people never discover their purpose in life while some do it late in the game.  Discovering your purpose early will help you channel all your energy towards that sole purpose thereby giving you speed. When you walk in purpose, you will achieve so much in very little time.

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3.   I wish I had taken more risks.

Some human beings have the tendency to live carefully, cautiously and seek security. While this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, sometimes it hinders us from achieving our destiny. There is no great or successful person who did not, at one point in their life, made a leap, took a big risk and have lived a more fulfilled life because of it.

4.   I wish I had taken better care of myself.

A common regret for those who are dying of an illness or ailment.  So many times, we take our body for granted and eat what we shouldn’t be eating, we don’t sleep as much as we should, we don’t exercise as often and in some cases, we work so hard, we forget to take a vacation.  Life should be lived with a balance and taking care of yourself so you can live a long, healthy and happy life should be a top priority.

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5.   I wish I’d allowed myself to love.

Life’s hardships can turn a lot of people cynical to the world and relationships with other people.  Sometimes, people avoid making a lot of friends or getting emotionally attached to avoid getting hurt. Petty arguments and grudges with loved ones build a wall that doesn’t allow you to forgive until it’s too late.

Studies have concluded that people who have friends and close relationships with their families are much happier with their lives as they have a support group around them for the good times and the bad times.  Surrounding yourself with love and allow yourself to love, creates fond memories that you’ll cherish to the end.

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6.  I wish I had touched more lives and inspired more people.

It is common for people who are dying to look back unhappy because of the number of lives they touched and the legacy they left behind. The value of a life can be measured by the number of people it touches. Helping others not only benefits the person you’re helping but it benefits you inside as well.  There’s a sense of fulfillment and satisfaction in doing for your fellow man that money just can’t buy.  Live your life with intentions to help and inspire others to become better and in return, you’ll be better for it as well.

7.  I wish I had been a better partner or parent.

People who are dying have regrets whenever they think about their families; whether it be their mom, dad, siblings, spouses or children.  They think about the nice words they wish they would have said more often, feelings they wish they had expressed, times they wish they had spent and places they wish they could have gone with them.  Family is very important.  Remind yourself to love and support your family.  Spend more time with them and say, “I love you ” on a regular basis.  It’s amazing how those three little words can enrich your family relationships.  At the end of your journey, you’ll rest easy knowing that your loved ones know you cared about them.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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