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20 Ways To Maximize Your Motivation All The Time

20 Ways To Maximize Your Motivation All The Time

Motivation is something that needs to be replenished regularly. After all, you can’t maximize your motivation all the time. Can you? Well, it turns out that yes, you can actually maximize your motivation all the time. All it takes is a little dash of optimism, a whole lot of discipline and a hint of encouragement to get you started. To give you an idea, here are 20 ways you can keep your motivation levels at an all-time high:

1. Make your very own life journal.

A life journal is a document that contains your life goals, aspirations and dreams. What makes it different from a vision board is that it contains the steps you’re going to take to reach your dreams. A vision board is a cliché — it only reminds you of what you want. A life journal, on the other hand, shows you what you should do in order to get what you want in life.

2. Find your peak hours and take advantage of them.

Some articles would tell you to wake up early — but what if you’re actually a night owl? Instead of conforming to common rules, personalize your own productivity and maximize your motivation by knowing which time of day works best for you.

3. Start each day with a powerful phrase.

Don’t live your life away — live it with purpose by living according to your powerful phrase. It has to be something emotional, something urgent and something that can instantly make you want to get up when you hear it. Therefore, don’t just read motivational quotes. Make your own mantra as well.

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4. Take a bath.

The way you handle yourself dictates the way you handle the rest of your day. If you can’t be bothered to shower, what makes you think that you can be bothered to pursue your life dreams?

5. Learn to organize energy, not time.

Time organization is limited – you can’t organize time because you can’t handle the way it’s distributed all throughout the day, right? Instead, organize your energy to maximize your motivation. You handle your own energy, so allocating it to specific tasks is much more manageable.

6. Remember that taking a break is essential.

You can’t do something for five hours straight! You have to plan for breaks so that your motivation level isn’t easily depleted. Try taking ten-minute breaks for every hour of work.

7. Cut your tasks into small pieces.

It’s easy to use up all your motivation if you’re thinking about huge and seemingly impossible tasks. Instead of being overwhelmed, get pumped up by distributing your tasks in small pieces. It’s also easier to feel more fulfilled if you’re able to do them one by one without fail.

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8. Get started with one.

Get rid of worrying! If you’re thinking about it, it’s important that you get started in doing it. Worrying about writing a book? Start with the first page. Worrying about exercising? Start with one exercise routine. Worrying about completing an article? Start with one paragraph! Pretty soon, you’ll be motivated to continue.

9. Read motivational books every week.

Your motivation needs to be on overdrive — don’t let it get depleted. Self-help books give you that much-needed boost to get you back on track with your life goals.

10. Have an accomplishment journal.

Every week, write down one thing that makes you feel fulfilled, excited and inspired. It could be something simple, like answering a really long email, or it could be something great, like being invited to talk to a seminar. Write what matters to you.

11. Listen to inspirational talks at least once a week.

You can do this while doing tasks that don’t need too much of your concentration. Play them while sorting through your mail, paying your bills or cleaning your office.

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12. Move. A lot!

Maximize your motivation by maximizing your body’s supply of happy hormones. You don’t need to go to a fancy gym to accomplish this — a simple run around your neighborhood or a basic exercise routine at your home can do wonders for your motivation.

13. Constantly remind yourself why you’re doing something.

Post simple reminders about your goals. For some people, negative reinforcement such as posting “If you don’t do this, you’ll be broke and miserable in the future” can work. For others, posting positive things like “Do this so that people will have better lives because of you” helps as well.

14. Send a message to your unmotivated self everyday.

When you’re in a motivated mood, schedule regular messages to send to yourself. These can be done in a form of an email or a text message. You can even have a special notebook for this. It can go something like this: “Dear Lianne, You’re reading this because you’re not motivated. I know, I’ve been there. It’s so hard, right? That’s why I’m here to help you! Don’t lay down. Sit up. Just sit up. Now, open your laptop. Just try opening it! See your life journal document? Click on that and read a few lines. You’re only clicking on it — that’s not so difficult, right? Read the lines and assess what you feel afterwards. Yes, you’re welcome. Now, go and do something meaningful with your life!”

15. Focus on progress, not perfection.

It’s tiring to see what’s ahead sometimes. Instead of looking forward, look back at what you’ve managed to do and work on that flow.

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16. Be accountable.

Announce your goal in public. Send emails to everyone about it. Post it on Facebook. Write a blog post about it. Let people know about the project that you’re planning to achieve.

17. Don’t be afraid to depend on others from time to time.

When you’re in a slump, talk to your friends about it. Tell your trusted loved ones. Don’t carry the burden all by yourself – people are social creatures for a reason.

18. Realize that your needs are your priorities.

You need to feel fulfilled. You need to achieve your mission. You need to work on what you’re passionate about. If you know all of these things, the fact that you need to work for your objectives seems a bit clearer, doesn’t it?

19. Develop a sense of urgency.

Know about the 20,000 mornings rule? Basically, if you’re already 30 or so, it’s estimated that you only have 20,000 mornings left to live your life. Try putting an automatic counter on your bed side. You wouldn’t want each day to pass without you doing something useful, now, would you?

20. If all else fails, consider whether the task is really worth doing.

Can you really live with the consequences of not doing the task now? If you can’t, get started. If you can, ask yourself again and give the honest answer. Be motivated now. Do it now. Tomorrow, it might already be too late.

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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