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14 Things to Do in Your Relationship

14 Things to Do in Your Relationship

Romantic relationships can be the most wonderful part about your life, but they can also be the worst. What are some things you can do in your relationship to move it towards the “wonderful” spectrum?

1. Talk about your day.

In any relationship, sharing every day experiences can help both sides. The person sharing can get any frustrations or thoughts off of his/her chest and the listener gets to know more about the other person.

2. Play together.

One important thing you can do in your relationship is to have fun and be silly together. Find a sitcom you both enjoy or Google jokes to tell each other. We’ve all heard that the best medicine is laughter, right? You can also break out the board games and a bottle of wine for a night of playful competition.

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3. Make food together.

Whether it’s cooking dinner or whipping up homemade chocolate chip cookies, food brings people together. You not only get to spend time together in the kitchen, but you also get to revel in the success of your dish and enjoy a meal together.

4. Define boundaries.

Whether you’ve been together five days, five weeks or five years, you might not be on the same page all of the time. You need to let the other person know what is and is not okay in regards to the relationship. This knowledge will allow you both to feel more relaxed, safe and comfortable.

5. Be honest.

Nothing hurts a relationship like a lie. It might not even be a huge deal, but the deception alone breaks trust that can be hard to recover. If you are feeling guilty about something, however small, it might be best to confess right away to ensure it doesn’t come up later.

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6. Snuggle.

Physical touch is so important to feel connected with your partner. Grab some popcorn and your favorite, movie and hunker down for a cozy night together.

7. Text good morning or good night.

Starting and/or ending the day showing your love you are thinking of him/her can help strengthen your relationship.

8. Encourage each other.

Whether your loved one is in school or working a job, he/she needs to know you support what he/she does!  Surprise your special someone a note of encouragement.

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9. Hang out together in a group.

Spending time as a couple is important, but it’s also important to see your partner interact with other people. You will likely remember why you fell for this person in the first place.

10. Sweat together.

Being physically fit is important as it is, but those who are in romantic relationships tend to ditch the gym in favor of spending time with his/her loved one. Why not combine together time and gym time? Most individuals find it attractive to see their partner break a sweat!

11. Be willing to compromise.

You might not always see eye to eye in your relationship; after all, you are two different people! The key is to be understanding of the other person’s ideals and when possible, meet halfway. This does not mean you have to give up everything you believe in, however it also means that you might not get your way every time. Accepting this balance is key in a healthy partnership.

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12. Compliment each other.

There is plenty of pressure from the outside world to be perfect—the perfect body, the perfect disposition, to be the most successful. A romantic relationship should be a safe place, so reassure your partner that he/she is attractive, loveable, and accomplished.

13. Travel together.

Exploring a new location, soaking up the sun, and trying new restaurants can help you further the bond of your relationship. If you travel via car to said destination, there is bound to be lots of conversations. You will surely get to know each other much better.

14. Be willing to work.

The final is a must. Relationships can be fun, but you also may encounter rough times. You must work through this to make your bond deeper and come out the other side stronger and happier than ever.

There might not be as much stress if you are not in a romantic relationship, but you certainly will not find the benefits of truly sharing life and love with someone if you don’t take the plunge!

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Amanda DeWitt

Writer. Photographer. Instagrammer. Future Educator.

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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