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Last Updated on March 24, 2021

10 Best Books About Life to Help You Find Your Meaning

10 Best Books About Life to Help You Find Your Meaning

For each of us, the meaning of life is different. But, we are all seeking answers so we can find our own meaning of life. For some of us, this is a lifelong journey. For others, it is a matter of taking the right steps to figure out why we are here, and what we are meant to do with our lives.

Here’re 10 best books about life that can help you find the meaning of your own life. Here are our top 10 picks.

1. To be Told: Know Your Story, Shape Your Future

to be told

    Dan Allender tends to use a lot of Christian language in his work, but his writing can help anyone who wants to learn more about themselves and do better in life. The more you know about yourself, the better able you will be to understand why you do what you do, and how to make changes that will lead to your success in life.

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    2. The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living

    The_Art_of_Happiness

      Author Howard Cutler wrote this Dalai Lama-inspired book for a Western audience. He talks about how important happiness is, and how easy it is to achieve.

      3. A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose

      A_New_Earth_by_Eckhart_Tolle

        Check your ego at the door, and enjoy a more abundant life. This is the message from spiritual teacher Eckhart Tolle, who talks about how the ego is the cause of all conflict in life. This book was selected by Oprah Winfrey for her book club, and has been read by millions.

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        4. The Hundred-Year Marathon

        3) The Hundred-Year Marathon

          This is a book chronicling the secret strategy of China to usurp the US as the global superpower. Author Michael Pillsbury, who has served in senior national security positions within the US government, uses his own personal knowledge of the subject (based on his career experiences) to give us this wake-up call to challenges within national security.

          5. Let Your Life Speak

          letyourlifespeak_palmer

            This book by Parker Palmer is a great book about work and meaning. The ideas in the book will help you with your vocation, by letting you see the author’s journey. There are loads of great quotes, which you are likely to read many times over for daily inspiration and affirmation.

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            6. The Celestine Prophecy

            Thecelestineprophecy

              Written by James Redfield (also his first self-published book), The Celestine Prophecy is part adventure and part New Age spirituality. It is about one man’s journey around Peru to discover nine insights into spirituality. Yes, the plot may be a bit cheesy, but the story is insightful and captivating.

              7. The Artist’s Way

              artistsway

                This is a great book for artists who are stuck in their work. Read about the 12-week journey that will help you get back on track with your art so you can get back to working on the greatest masterpiece of your life.

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                8. The Alchemist

                the-alchemist-paulo-coelho-040313-marg

                  Written by Paulo Coelho, this is the story of a shepherd’s journey to the Egyptian pyramids to find treasure. Learn how to discover your own legend, be your own purpose, and understand omens.

                  9. Dream Year

                  dreamyear

                    This book is new this year, but it is good enough to be included in the company of these other great books. Written by Ben Arment, author of Seattle’s Pitch Night, this book is for entrepreneurs and anyone else who has big dreams and wants to find ways to see those dreams come to fruition.

                    10. The Secret

                    the-secret-book-cover-rhonda-byrne11

                      Based on the 2004 film of the same title and written by Rhonda Byrne (television producer, Melbourne), The Secret talks about the laws of attraction. This is a book that is going to show you how to believe in what you want, and actually get it because you believe in it.

                      Featured photo credit: Brittany Stevens via flickr.com

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                      Jane Hurst

                      Writer, editor

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                      1 Understanding Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: 5 Levels Explained 2 How to Find Purpose in Life and Make Yourself a Better Person 3 The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want 4 How to Effectively Find Your Life’s Purpose 5 How to Find Your Core Values to Live a Fulfilling Life

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                      Last Updated on April 19, 2021

                      Understanding Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: 5 Levels Explained

                      Understanding Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: 5 Levels Explained

                      Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a theory of motivation that lists five categories of human needs that dictate individual behavior. These five categories refer to physiological needs, safety needs, love and belonging needs, esteem needs, and self-actualization needs.[1]

                      Motivation plays a big part in athletic coaching. I spent 44 years coaching basketball and each day at practice, I was trying to motivate our athletes to give their best effort. In this article, I will examine Maslow’s hierarchy and five areas of needs from an athletic perspective.

                      1. Physiological Needs

                      These needs represent the most basic human survival needs. They include food, water, rest, and breathing, and all four have importance in athletics.

                      Food has had an evolution in the world of athletics. I cannot recall my coaches in the 1950s and ‘60s mentioning anything about food. As time went on, the pre-game meal became important. Steak seemed to be the meal of choice early in the evolution. Research then indicated pasta would be the better choice.[2]

                      Today, I think most coaches prefer pasta. However, if the players are ordering from menus, some coaches believe the players should stick with their regular diets and order accordingly.

                      The next step in this evolution was that the pre-game meal, although important, is not nearly as critical as the athletes’ overall nutrition. At our University of St. Francis athletic seminars, we invited nutritionists to speak and to educate our players on their nutritional habits.

                      The ultimate change in food intake may be the Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback, Tom Brady. He adheres to a specific, disciplined diet that has allowed him to play superb football at age 43.

                      Water also has had an evolution in sports. It went from not being allowed in practices to coaches scheduling water breaks during the practices.

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                      Rest is extremely important in all sports, and statistics validate its importance. NBA research found that during the course of the season teams win 6 of 10 games at home but only 4 of 10 on the road. In the NBA playoffs, the statistics change to 6.5 at home and 3.5 on the road. Many coaches believe rest is the key factor to these statistics because the players are sleeping in their own beds for home games.[3]

                      Our St. Francis basketball team found the importance of breathing on a trip to play in a tournament in Colorado. In our first game, we were playing great and winning by 12 points early in the game. Then the altitude kicked in, adversely affected our breathing, and we lost the lead and eventually the game.

                      In our second game, having learned our lesson, we substituted more frequently! Maslow’s idea of physiological needs plays a major part in the athletic arena.

                      2. Safety Needs

                      Safety needs include protection from violence, emotional stability and well-being, health security, and financial security.

                      If a fight breaks out during a basketball game, there can be serious injuries. This is the reason a coach steps in immediately when there is any violence or dirty play in practice. The coach must protect the players. You drill your teams to play hard—never dirty.

                      The importance of emotional stability has gained more credence in sports in recent years. Many teams hire psychologists to help work with their players. There is a great deal of player failure in sports and it is critical for the players to stay emotionally stable.

                      Health security is much more prevalent in sports today than in my playing days. I once got a concussion during a basketball game. We had no trainers. The coach handled it by telling me after the game, “Sullivan, you play better when you don’t know where the hell you are!” He was right, and my medical treatment ended there! Games today have trainers available to protect the health of the athletes.

                      Financial security is predominant in professional sports. Most players today use free agency to go where the money is because they consider sport not to be a sport at all. They believe it is a short-term business at their level. I personally appreciate the athletes who have taken less money so the team can retain teammates or use the dollars to bring in new players.

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                      3. Love and Belonging Needs

                      These needs can be summed up with two words: love and relationships.

                      After teams win championships, you will often hear coaches say, “I love these guys” or “I loved coaching this team.” You can tell by their body language and the tone of their voice that they really mean it.

                      I think coaches say this because the season can be a tough grind. Practices, scouting, film work, travel, and problems that arise take a toll on coaches. However, when you have teams that give all they have every night in practice, you do come to love them.

                      ESPN did a 30-30 segment on the North Carolina State national championship team coached by Jim Valvano. I was especially interested in watching it because I knew a player on the team who used to come to our camps. Terry Gannon played a major role in their championship.

                      The program was a reunion of their players. This was 20 plus years from their title, and if you were to take one thing away from the show, it would be how much the players loved each other.

                      In the last analysis, sport is all about relationships. You can meet former teammates with whom you played 40 to 50 years earlier and that athletic bond is as strong as it ever was. Although you may have not seen each other in years, your friendship is so cemented it’s like you have been seeing each other weekly.

                      David Halberstam’s book, The Teammates: A Portrait of a Friendship, validates the relationship between athletics forges. Ted Williams is dying and three of his former Boston Red Sox teammates—Bobby Doerr, Johnny Pesky, and Dom DiMaggio—make the trip to Florida to see him. Even though 50 years had passed since they played together, the bond among them never waned.

                      Love and belonging epitomize the essence of sports.

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                      4. Esteem Needs

                      These needs are characterized by self-respect and self-esteem. Self-respect is “the belief that you are valuable and deserve dignity.” Self-esteem is twofold—“it is based on the respect and acknowledgment from others and esteem which is based on your own self-assessment.”[4]

                      Often the players on the bench are the ones the coach respects the most because they work so hard in practices yet receive none of the glory. The best coaches never let the starters or stars ever denigrate the players on the bench. Coaches must always acknowledge the value and the dignity of those who play little. They often turn out to be the superstars of their professions.

                      Some coaches will never get “it.” They think they can motivate their players by degrading them. They embarrass the athletes during games and they constantly berate their performance in practices.

                      Great coaches are just the opposite. They are encouragers. They do push their players and they push them hard, but they always respect them. Great coaches enhance the self-esteem and confidence of their players.

                      5. Self-Actualization Needs

                      “Self-actualization describes the fulfillment of your full potential as a person.”[5]

                      I believe three words are the key to self-actualization: potential, effort, and regrets.

                      You often hear in athletics that a player has potential. It also is not uncommon for the person introducing the athlete to rave about his potential. I was fortunate to work with an outstanding man in the Milwaukee Bucks camps, Ron Blomberg. Ron had the best definition of potential that I ever heard: “Potential means he hasn’t done it.” Will he do all the work necessary to fulfill his potential?

                      Effort is great, but it’s not enough. If you want to reach your full potential, you must have a consistency of effort in your daily habit. Only consistency of effort can lead to success.

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                      John Wooden, the legendary UCLA basketball coach, said that success is becoming all your ability will allow you to be. He agreed with his friend, major league umpire, George Moriarty, even though he used to kid him. Coach told him he never had seen Moriarty spelled with just one “i.” He followed this with, “Of course, the baseball players accused him of having only one ‘eye’ in his head as well.”

                      In his poem, The Road Ahead or The Road Behind, Moriarty wrote,

                      “. . . for who can ask more of a man
                      than giving all within his span, it seems to me, is not so far from – Victory.

                      When your life is winding down and you look back if you can say you gave “all in your span”—that you consistently gave it your best effort—you will have reached your full potential and there will be no regrets.

                      Final Thoughts

                      Now that you’ve learned more about Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, consider reflecting on the last two needs (esteem needs and self-actualization needs) and ask yourself the following questions:

                      • Are you doing all you can to enhance the self-esteem of those around you?
                      • Are you doing all you can to self-actualize the potential you have been given?

                      Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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