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Published on August 13, 2018

How to Improve Credit Score Quickly with These 10 Tactics that Work

How to Improve Credit Score Quickly with These 10 Tactics that Work

It’s been months since you’ve tried improving your credit score but had little success. And since you’re planning to make large purchases soon, you start feeling hopeless.

The problem is you don’t know where to start. With too many resources available, you become paralyzed with fear. But you know you can’t sit still forever. So what’s your next step?

To learn from others who’ve already experienced success.

Take my case, for example, my current credit score is 750+, but this wasn’t always the case. At one point I had no credit and lost over 100 points. Through trial and error, plus learning from others I’ve learned which tactics work.

You don’t need complicated strategies, you only need a few that work. The tactics provided in this list are the same ones I’ve used to increase my credit score. While your credit score won’t improve overnight, it’ll improve quicker than most.

Here are 10 tactics you can use to finally improve your credit score:

1. Revise for any errors

Before you attempt to improve your credit score, check where you stand. Pull a free credit credit report and ensure that all your information is accurate. For example, check for misspellings, wrong addresses and accounts not belonging to you.

If there’s any bad information, contact the credit reporting company. To avoid any prolonged issues, aim to check your credit at least once per year. You’re entitled by Federal law to 1 free credit report from all 3 credit reporting agencies.

Download Credit Karma, or Credit Sesame to track your credit score. This will help you stay motivated as you’re changing bad habits to improve your credit score.

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2. Stop depending on credit

A major reason for having bad credit is due to carrying several credit balances. Instead, focus on paying down all your credit cards and only use one. Save money by consolidating all your credit card balances into a 0% interest credit card.

Once you’ve consolidated all or most of your credit card debt, make more than the minimum payment. Why? Because it can take years for you to pay off those balances making the smallest payment.

It can feel overwhelming keeping track of many credit cards and other expenses. Fortunately, a simple solution is to use apps like Mint to better track your cashflow.

3. Say no to new credit cards

Ironically, the better your credit score is, the more credit offers you’ll receive. But this doesn’t mean that you should open dozens of new credit cards. Limit yourself to only have 1 to 4 credit cards.

If you find that you already have more than 4, focus on eliminating ones you don’t use or have an annual fee. Many companies and stores will try to convince you to open new credit cards with a one-time cash bonus. Don’t fall for it.

4. Leave your bills on autopilot

Because you’re human, you’re bound to be late on payments at some point. A great way to avoid being late is by setting up automatic payments for your bills. Nowadays, most large banks have a “bill pay” feature that allows you to set up recurring payments.

Review your credit billing history and write down bill due dates on a separate sheet of paper. Be sure to have a good understanding of your cash flow to know how much money you’ll have left over each month. Use the remaining amount to make extra credit card payments.

Stay motivated by setting a deadline for when you’d like to be credit card debt free. Then break down your entire credit card balance by month. For example, if you’d like to be debt free in 16 months with a $5,000 credit card balance, make a $313 payment each month ($5,000/16).

Make sure to pick a date that’s attainable and one with payments you’ll be able to afford. It’s better to pay a lesser amount if you’ll be consistent.

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5. Make your bills adapt to you

Everyone’s pay cycle is different, so adjust your bill’s due date to a date convenient for you. If your bill is due on the 1st of the month but you get paid on the 7th, change accordingly.

Sometimes changing your due date is too much of hassle or not possible. In this case, consider using your credit card to make your payments.[1] But, as soon as these payments post to your credit card, be sure to pay them off.

6. Be wary of excessive credit

Keep your credit utilization below 30%. Using more credit gives the impression to companies that you’re struggling financially. Vintagesscore recommends using no more than 30% of your credit utilization.

What’s your credit utilization? Divide your total outstanding debt by your total credit. For example, if you had $3,000 in outstanding debt with a $10,000 credit limit, your credit utilization is 30%. Now review all your credit cards and calculate your credit utilization.

So when do you use your credit cards? Only to make purchases you’ll be able to pay off either immediately or within a month.

Stop depending on your credit card to make daily purchases and use your debit card instead. You’ll be less likely to make impulsive purchases and buy only what you can afford. The best part is you’ll start breaking the bad habits that got you a bad credit score in the first place.

7. Don’t abuse credit inquiries

Be wary of hard credit inquiries. These types of inquiries can bring down your credit score a few points. A few points may not sound like much, but they add up.

Hard credit inquiries are necessary for the different stages in your life but you’ll need to be strategic for when to use them.

Here are some examples of hard inquiries:

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  • Auto loan application
  • Mortgage application
  • Student loan application
  • Personal loan application
  • Apartment application

Plan ahead for big purchases. This way you’ll avoid running many hard inquiries against your credit all at once. The good news is that big purchases aren’t made often, so you’ll have time to prepare.

Set a timeline for when you’d like to make large purchases to know if your credit score is in good standing.

8. Become an authorized user

Start building credit by becoming an authorized user in someone else’s account. As an authorized user, you’ll be able to make purchases with your own credit card. But the owner will still be responsible to make payments on time.

It’ll be challenging to find someone who’d be willing to add you as an authorized user to their account. So start by asking a close relative or friend. Once added, it’s a great way to build creditworthiness over time, so be persistent.

9. Praise your credit history

Don’t close good standing credit cards. Good standing credit cards show lenders you’ve been able to make payments on time for an extended period.

Instead, if you decide to no longer use a credit card, leave it home somewhere out of sight.

Do close credit cards that are charging you annual fees or have a short history. Be sure to do this during a period you won’t be making large purchases.

10. Conquer goals with patience

The truth is building your credit score won’t be easy, but it’s well worth the effort. To stay motivated, write down your main reason for wanting to improve your credit score.

For example, if you want to buy a house, set a concrete date to work towards to. Then start researching what credit score you’ll need to buy your home. From here, break down your goal into daily actionable steps.

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A sample month can look like this:

  • Week 1: Leave credit card at home
  • Week 2: Call banks to inquire about ideal credit score to have
  • Week 3: Create a pay off date for your credit card with the lowest balance
  • Week 4: Save $10 to make a principal payment towards your credit card

Consistency is key. It’s best to start with small goals and make consistent progress. Once you start seeing success aim for bigger goals.

“Most people overestimate what they can do in a day, and underestimate what they can do in a month.” – Matthew Kelly

Make your dream purchases effortlessly

Imagine waking up to a buzzing noise. It’s your smartphone notifying you that your credit score is now 700. You smile, grab your coffee, and start your morning feeling invincible.

It wasn’t easy but with hard work and discipline, you were able to improve your credit score.

Best of all, your finances are now better than ever. You have a budget and stick to it. Amazing isn’t it?

You now have 10 proven strategies to boost your credit score. Try each tactic but remember to have patience. Increasing your credit score won’t happen overnight. But you’ll form life-changing habits along the way.

What are you waiting for? Go get em’ tiger.

Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pixabay.com

Reference

More by this author

Christopher Alarcon

Content Marketer and Finance Analyst

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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