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Firefighters Help Dying Man Fulfill His Final Wish, The Story Behind Is Amazing

Firefighters Help Dying Man Fulfill His Final Wish, The Story Behind Is Amazing

When we grow up as young men, we develop bold and aspirational goals that will shape our future destiny. These can relate to both our personal and professional lives, whether you want to follow the time-honoured tradition of saving three months’ wages to buy your loved one an engagement ring or wish to build a business that will change the lives of millions.

Former forest ranger Edward Reis probably held many of these aspirations himself during his youth, before fate struck a cruel blow and left him suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). This aggressive illness left him bedridden, forcing him to leave his home and move into a hospice in Washington. Not only this, but the illness also changed his perspective on life, forcing him to realign his goals and expectations.

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How the Snomish County Fire District Made a Dying Dream Come True

Gradually Reis’ condition became terminal, but this did little to dampen his spirit and love of the great outdoors. Passionate about the natural world, Reis discovered that he had an overwhelming desire to go outside just one more time, before his time came to pass. He shared this with a registered nurse by the name of Leigh Gardner, who was a nurse at the hospice and whom Reis had struck up a close and lasting bond.

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    After a brief discussion Leigh, who described Reis as a ‘gentle soul’, visited her hospice chaplain that her patient wanted to go outside one, final time. He shared her belief that they should make this happen, so they contacted the local Snomish Country Fire District and implored them to help making a dying man’s wish come true.

    They, of course, were only too keen to make this happen, an on March 26th, 2014, a team of firefighters arrived on-mass at the Evergreen Hospice and helped Reis onto their truck. From here, they took him on an emotional, three-hour excursion to Meadowdale Beach Park in Edmonds, WA, granting his final wish as he was led across numerous trails, allowed to take in the fresh, spring air and left awe-struck by the sound of chirping birds. And with this, a loving and passionate soul had been restored, as its one, final wish came to pass.

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      How Reis Touched Hearts and Lives Across the Globe

      Little is known about Reis’ personal life, such as whether he ever experienced the joys of marriage or parenthood. After his last outdoor adventure, however, the firefighters who had accompanied Reis became his family, often visiting him as his life began to ebb away. It was not long afterwards that Reis finally passed, with his heart full of happiness and his final wish fulfilled.

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      While this story has touched millions across the globe and reinforces the spirit of generosity that exists within us all, it is also a warning to enjoy life and make the most of every single day. Remember, while your goals an aspirations may change as you get older, you must always strive to make your dreams a reality and your life as memorable as possible.

      Featured photo credit: Little Things via littlethings.com

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      Last Updated on January 18, 2019

      7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

      7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

      Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

      But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

      If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

      1. Limit the time you spend with them.

      First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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      In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

      Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

      2. Speak up for yourself.

      Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

      3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

      This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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      But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

      4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

      Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

      This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

      Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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      5. Change the subject.

      When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

      Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

      6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

      Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

      I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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      You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

      Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

      7. Leave them behind.

      Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

      If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

      That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

      You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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