Advertising
Advertising

7 Ways To Make The Most Of Your Commute

7 Ways To Make The Most Of Your Commute

On average, we spend over a year of our lives getting to and from work. That’s over 13,000 hours that we will spend stuck on a crowded train, struggling to ignore people blasting their music and clenching our fists when the person sitting opposite us whips out a stinky tuna sandwich.

We spend a huge amount of time commuting, and it’s time to start making the most of it, but you don’t have to complete the world’s hardest crossword puzzle or slog through the entirety of War And Peace to accomplish something on your journey.

Here are 7 easy ways to make the most of your commute:

1. Meditate

Meditating is one of those things we know we should do but sometimes struggle with — a bit like drinking more water, eating more broccoli or spending less money on overpriced coffee. Luckily, your journey to work opens the doors to another journey towards a calm and focused mind. Just 10 minutes on your morning train can transform your mindset for the day, helping you to feel more focused, energized and ready to take on whatever the day throws at you.

I use the app ‘Calm’ to do my morning meditation, and it honestly does transform my day. The app contains an entire section on commuting, and the meditation times vary from 2 to 90 minutes, so there is something to suit even the shortest of journeys. Calm also includes meditations for anxiety, gratitude, and a deep sleep.

Meditation has a whole host of benefits, and your daily commute is the perfect opportunity to take 10 minutes for yourself, and see how it impacts the rest of your day.

Advertising

2. Start a gratitude journal

Writing down the things in your life to be thankful for (no matter how small!) can lower stress levels, increase empathy and improve sleep, among so many other benefits. A good place to start is to simply write down 3 good things about your day. It only takes 5 minutes, and it can help you feel so much more appreciative of what you have.

Gone are the days of getting frustrated because someone bought the wrong milk. When you welcome gratitude into your life, you will start to see the best in difficult situations, while also appreciating the good things in life – a good cup of tea or the sun on your face in the morning. Gratitude makes us happier, healthier and just a general dream to be around!

3. Learn a language

I’m sure many of us were forced to learn either French, German or Spanish at school and, if you’re like me, these lessons were the definition of hell. Hours slogging away at French grammar that will still be useless to me when I do finally visit France isn’t the most rewarding of tasks.

Now, thanks to podcasts, language apps and YouTube, there are so many ways to start learning a new language and your commute is the perfect time to get started. My favourite app is DuoLingo, and I also listen to the News In Slow Spanish podcast.

Let’s face it; the British don’t have a great track record when it comes to language learning, so let’s forget the ‘everyone else speaks English excuse’ and start practising. Not only is it extremely rewarding, but you might even be able to bargain and get better deals if you visit the countries whose language you can speak. Add in being able to chat to locals while challenging Britain’s reputation as terrible language learners and you’ve got yourself an invaluable skill.

4. Fall in love with reading

My mum has commuted 2 hours into London every day for the past 14 years. After falling asleep at 8:30 pm for the fourth night in a row, I asked her how she did it. She replied that she would never have been able to if it wasn’t for her love of reading.

Advertising

Reading is something so many people would love to do but claim they don’t have time for, so spend your commuting time getting stuck into a great book. It doesn’t have to be anything difficult; my favourite genres are psychological or murder mystery thrillers like Gone Girl (or anything by Gillian Flynn) and Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins. They are so gripping you may find yourself looking forward to your train journey.

So switch off your phone and dive in.

Once you’re home, you are free to binge watch Game of Thrones to your heart’s content–you’ve earned it.

5. Set daily goals

It goes without saying that a train journey is a great time to get yourself organised. For this reason, I always keep a journal handy so I can jot down thoughts as they come into my head. I usually make a list of things I want to accomplish that day – including what I’ve already done just for that little ego boost (we’ve all done it).

I list my tasks into high priority: things that I will do as soon as I get to work, and low priority: things I do when I have time. As well as tasks, I also write down things I want to focus on that day. These usually involve staying present and mindful, alongside a rough plan of things to do when I get home from work – something that doesn’t involve watching TV while eating half a loaf of bread,

My journal is the one thing I couldn’t live without so try taking 10 minutes at the start of your day to write down all your plans and daily goals, then put it away and relax for the rest of the journey.

Advertising

6. Get inspired

Whether on the train, bus or tube there is always inspiration to be found. Instead of gazing mindlessly out of the window for the entire journey, try taking a few minutes to notice the people around you. Notice their clothes, the books they’re reading, the general vibe they give off. Perhaps you like their shoes, have never heard of the book they’re holding, or you’re wondering how they’ve managed to eat a BBQ chicken wrap so neatly.

There is always value to be found in simply noticing what is around you, so next time you feel your thoughts running away with you, try tuning into your senses to see if there’s anything that sparks your interest.

We zone out so often throughout the day and do the majority of our mundane tasks on autopilot (remember how you brushed your teeth this morning?). By simply taking the time to notice what’s going on around us, we can ensure that we don’t just let life pass by unnoticed.

7. Practise tolerance

People are annoying. We all know it. We can probably be annoying ourselves. But the simple fact of life is that we have to deal with people we don’t necessarily see eye-to-eye with on a daily basis, and disputes are rarely solved by losing our tempers. When I first started commuting, I would raise my eyebrows if anyone so much as blew their nose in my vicinity, and God help anyone who put their bag down on the seat next to them.

It sometimes feels like there are more commuting faux-pas than there are commuters, so there are ample reasons to get frustrated on long journeys. Add to the mix a delayed train during a heatwave and you are looking at a seriously angry group of people.

But we all know getting angry is a waste of time and energy. Practising tolerance, or at least learning to recognize when you feel frustration rising, will help you in all areas of life.

Advertising

So, next time you are on the train, and someone takes their shoes off or scoffs down a bag of cheese and onion crisps, take a few moments to control your emotions before they begin to control you. When you feel angry emotions starting to take over, try not to react, just simply be aware of your anger. Notice the physical sensations that arise with it, whether you start to feel hot, out of breath or getting tight in the shoulders. Take a moment to notice where your anger is stored in your body and try to imagine yourself breathing into that specific area, and allow the tension to soften as you exhale.

This does not mean you are suppressing your anger. Instead, you are choosing not to react. You are simply observing what the emotion feels like and allowing it to pass. By practising this on the train or bus, you will be far better equipped to handle difficult people throughout the day.

For many of us, commuting is an unavoidable part of our working lives, but there is no reason for it to become something we dread. These little hacks will help you to make the most of your commute, and soon your journey may become a positive start (and end) to the working day.

Featured photo credit: Charles Forerunner via unsplash.com

More by this author

Apps to get you in the christmas spirit 7 Apps To Get You Into The Festive Spirit! an app for each day of the week 1 Essential App for Every Day of The Week 5 Apps To Make Your Hangover Hurt Less make the most of your commute 7 Ways To Make The Most Of Your Commute

Trending in Productivity

1 How Not to Feel Overwhelmed at Work & Take Control of Your Day 2 13 Work Life Balance Tips for a Happy and Productive Life 3 How to Commit, Achieve Excellence And Change Your Life 4 How to Stay Consistent and Realize Your Dreams 5 How to Set Goals in Life to Achieve the Success You Want

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on July 13, 2020

How Not to Feel Overwhelmed at Work & Take Control of Your Day

How Not to Feel Overwhelmed at Work & Take Control of Your Day

Overwhelm is a pernicious state largely caused by the ever-increasing demands on our time and the distractions that exist all around us. It creeps up on us and can, in its extreme form, leave us feeling anxious, stressed and exhausted.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed at work, here are 6 strategies you can follow that will reduce the feeling of overwhelm; leaving you calmer, in control and a lot less stressed.

1. Write Everything down to Offload Your Mind

The first thing you can do when you begin to feel overwhelmed is to write everything down that is on your mind.

Often people just write down all the things they think they have to do. This does help, but a more effective way to reduce overwhelm is to also write down everything that’s on your mind.

For example, you may have had an argument with your colleague or a loved one. If it’s on your mind write it down. A good way to do this is to draw a line down the middle of the page and title one section “things to do” and the other “what’s on my mind”.

The act of writing all this down and getting it out of your head will begin the process of removing your feeling of overwhelm. Writing things down can really change your life.

2. Decide How Long It Will Take to Complete Your To-Dos

Once you have ‘emptied your head,’ go through your list and estimate how long it will take to complete each to-do.

Advertising

As you go through your list, you will find quite a few to-dos will only take you five or ten minutes. Others will take longer, often up to several hours.

Do not worry about that at this stage. Just focus on estimating how long you will need to complete each task to the best of your ability. Here’s How to Cultivate a More Meaningful To Do List.

3. Take Advantage of Parkinson’s Law

Now here’s a little trick I learned a long time ago. Parkinson’s Law states that work will fill the time you have available to complete it, and us humans are terrible at estimating how long something will take:((Odhable: Genesis of Parkinson’s Law))

    This is why many people are always late. They think it will only take them thirty minutes to drive across town when previous experience has taught them it usually takes forty-five minutes to do so because traffic is often bad but they stick to the belief it will only take thirty minutes. It’s more wishful thinking than good judgment.

    We can use Parkinson’s Law to our advantage. If you have estimated that to write five emails that desperately need a reply to be ninety minutes, then reduce it down to one hour. Likewise, if you have estimated it will take you three hours to prepare your upcoming presentation, reduce it down to two hours.

    Reducing the time you estimate something will take gives you two advantages. The first is you get your work done quicker, obviously. The second is you put yourself under a little time pressure and in doing so you reduce the likelihood you will be distracted or allow yourself to procrastinate.

    Advertising

    When we overestimate how long something will take, subconsciously our brains know we have plenty of time and so it plays tricks on us and we end up checking reviews of the Apple Watch 4 or allow our colleagues to interrupt us with the latest office gossip.

    Applying a little time pressure prevents this from happening and we get more focused and more work done.

    4. Use the Power of Your Calendar

    Once you have your time estimates done, open up your calendar and schedule your to-dos. Go through your to-dos and schedule time on your calendar for doing those tasks. Group tasks up into similar tasks.

    For emails that need attention on your to-do list, schedule time on your calendar to deal with all your emails at once. Likewise, if you have a report to write or a presentation to prepare, add these to your calendar using your estimated time as a guide for how long each will take.

    Seeing these items on your calendar eases your mind because you know you have allocated time to get them done and you no longer feel you have no time. Grouping similar tasks together keeps you in a focused state longer and it’s amazing how much work you get done when you do this.

    5. Make Decisions

    For those things you wrote down that are on your mind but are not tasks, make a decision about what you will do with each one. These things are on your mind because you have not made a decision about them.

    If you have an issue with a colleague, a friend or a loved one, take a little time to think about what would be the best way to resolve the problem. More often than not just talking with the person involved will clear the air and resolve the problem.

    Advertising

    If it is a more serious issue, then decide how best to deal with it. Talk to your boss, a colleague and get advice.

    Whatever you do, do not allow it to fester. Ignoring the problem will not make it go away. You need to make a decision to deal with it and the sooner you do so the sooner the problem will be resolved. (You can take a look at this guide on How To Make Good Decisions All The Time.)

    I remember long ago, when I was in my early twenties and had gone mad with my newly acquired credit cards. I discovered I didn’t have the money to pay my monthly bills. I worried about it for days, got stressed and really didn’t know what to do. Eventually, I told a good friend of mine of the problem. He suggested I called the credit card company to explain my problem. The next day, I plucked up the courage to call the company, explained my problem and the wonderful person the other end listened and then suggested I paid a smaller amount for a couple of months.

    This one phone call took no more than ten minutes to make, yet it solved my problem and took away a lot of the stress I was feeling at the time. I learned two very valuable lessons from that experience:

    The first, don’t go mad with newly acquired credit cards! And the second, there’s always a solution to every problem if you just talk to the right person.

    6. Take Some Form of Action

    Because overwhelm is something that creeps up on us, once we feel overwhelmed (and stressed as the two often go together), the key is to take some form of action.

    The act of writing everything down that is bothering you and causing you to feel overwhelmed is a great place to start. Being able to see what it is that is bothering you in a list form, no matter how long that list is, eases the mind. You have externalized it.

    Advertising

    It also means rather than these worries floating around in a jumbled mess inside your head, they are now visible and you can make decisions easier about what to do about them. Often it could be asking a colleague for a little help, or it could be you see you need to allocate some focused time to get the work done. The important thing is you make a decision on what to do next.

    Overwhelm is not always caused by a feeling of having a lack of time or too much work, it can also be caused by avoiding a decision about what to do next.

    The Bottom Line

    Make a decision, even if it is to just talk to someone about what to do next. Making a decision about how you will resolve something on its own will reduce your feelings of overwhelm and start you down the path to a resolution one way or another.

    When you follow these strategies to can say goodbye to your overwhelm and gain much more control over your day.

    More Tips for Reducing Work Stress

    Featured photo credit: Andrei Lazarev via unsplash.com

    Read Next