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Why Doing a Job That Pays More Doesn’t Increase Your Happiness

Why Doing a Job That Pays More Doesn’t Increase Your Happiness

Nod your head if you know someone who is not satisfied with their job, despite earning copious amounts of money. I’m pretty sure that you can at least name one person. Or maybe you are that person? Previous studies have shown that there is a positive correlation between income growth and happiness. The problem is, these were short-term studies.

Happiness-Income Paradox

In a research paper entitled Happiness-Income Paradox Revisited, Richard Easterlin, professor of Economics and founder of the field of happiness studies, revisits the happiness-income paradox or the Easterlin paradox. The study analyzed the happiness and income relationship – across a worldwide sample of 37 countries over a period of 22 years.

In speaking to Science Daily, Easterlin explains the paradox as follows:

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“Simply stated, the happiness-income paradox is this: at a point in time both among and within countries, happiness and income are positively correlated. But, over time, happiness does not increase when a country’s income increases.”

Easterlin goes on to say:

“Where does this leave us? If economic growth is not the main route to greater happiness, what is? We may need to focus policy more directly on urgent personal concerns relating to things such as health and family life, rather than on the mere escalation of material goods.”

The Factors of Improved Job Satisfaction And Happiness

Money then really doesn’t buy us happiness. Sure, it matters. We need it to survive. We need it to pay the bills. We need it to do stuff we enjoy. But our job satisfaction and ultimately our happiness does not depend solely on it. There are other factors to consider.

This is highlighted by Robert H. Frank – Economic Professor and NY Times contributor, in his article, The Incalculable Value of Finding a Job You Love.

Attractive working conditions, greater workplace autonomy, more opportunities for learning and enhanced workplace safety – are all factors. An important dimension of job satisfaction is also how people feel about their companies’ mission or values.

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Frank uses the example of someone weighing up two jobs for writing advertising copy for two different companies. The first is for the American Cancer Society campaign to discourage teenage smoking, and the second is for a tobacco industry campaign to encourage it. He asked his students at Cornell which one of these they would choose if the pay was identical. Almost 90% were in favor of the former. No surprise there.

But arguably one of the most important elements of job satisfaction and ultimately happiness is doing something you truly love. Psychologists have identified “flow” as one of the most satisfying human psychological states. It happens when you are so engrossed in an activity that you lose track of time and what is going on around you. During flow, people often experience deep enjoyment and creativity. Many people who do jobs they love can attest to experiencing such feelings.

Do A Job You Love, Money Doesn’t Matter

Wouldn’t you want to experience such feelings all the time? Particularly as you spend a huge portion of your life working. No one is denying the importance of money. After all, we need it to survive. We need it to pay the bills. But as Frank mentions:

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“…social science findings establish clearly that once you have met your basic obligations, it’s possible to live a very satisfying life even if you don’t earn a lot of money.”

It makes sense then to do a job you truly love, even if your earnings aren’t high. If you are someone who has already found that job, thumbs up to you and if you are someone who hasn’t, keep searching. Find that flow. It will be worth it.

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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