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8 Books From World-Class Leaders Telling You How To Achieve Phenomenal Success

8 Books From World-Class Leaders Telling You How To Achieve Phenomenal Success
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As Jim Rohn once said: “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.”

So if you want to be successful in life, it makes sense to spend time with successful people. While we can’t all rub shoulders with the likes of Branson and Jobs, we can do the next best thing. We can read books from world-class leaders. We can soak up their soul while we read their stories. Messages of inspiration, lessons learned and strategies for success.

So grab a good book and you’ll be a roaring success in no time.

1. Thrive by Arianna Huffington

Thrive

    Arianna Huffington is the cofounder and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post Media Group and one of the world’s most influential women. She graces the covers of magazines and is extraordinarily successful. In Thrive, Adrianna compels us to redefine success. She shows us what many people around the world are learning – that our current definition of success is literally killing us.

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    If you suspect there’s more to life than a fat salary and a luxurious office, this one is for you.

    2. The Icarus Deception by Seth Godin

    The Icarus Deception

      Seth Godin is the author of eighteen international bestsellers that have changed the way people think about marketing and work. He is one of the most inspiring people I can think of, and this is his most inspiring book. In The Icarus Deception, he challenges readers to leap into the unknown, dive deep into their psyche and discover the courage to treat work as art. He reminds us that conformity doesn’t lead to comfort and that creativity is more scarce and valuable than ever before.

      Godin shows you that you can become an artist. He teaches us how it’s possible and convinces us why it’s essential.

      3. Make Every Man Want You by Marie Forleo

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      Make Every Man Want You

        Marie Forleo has been named by Oprah as a thought leader for the next generation and one of Inc.’s 500 fastest growing companies of 2014. Her book, Make Every Man Want You , is not about finding a man – it’s about you.This book will show you how to become more appealing to others in almost every situation. It’s a crash course in desirability and a life-changing lesson in loving yourself.

        Marie will give you a confidence boost so you learn to love yourself inside and out. Then you’ll be well on your way to achieving success on your own terms.

        4. Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook by Gary Vaynerchuk

        Jab Jab Jab

          Social media expert and bestselling author Gary Vaynerchuk tells us how to stand out in our noisy world. If you crave success, Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook is your blueprint to social media marketing strategies that really work. Vaynerchuk also articulates the massive change that’s occurred in social media and says that to be successful, social media needs to be platform specific. That is, we need to tailor our message for each community, whether it’s Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or elsewhere.

          This book will show you the value of giving to your customers before asking for the sale.

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          5. The Fire Starter Sessions by Danielle La Porte

          Fire Starter Sessions

            Danielle LaPort is an inspirational speaker, poet, former think tank exec and business strategist. Her website is deemed “the best place on-line for kick-ass spirituality”, and was named one of the “Top 100 Websites for Women” by Forbes. This book will show you that chasing life balance causes you stress and that being well-rounded is over-rated. You’ll learn that we have ambition backwards, fulfillment comes from getting clear on what you want in life and work.

            In The Firestarter Sessions, LaPorte kicks apathy to the door and encourages you to define success on your own terms.

            6. The 7 Day Startup by Dan Norris

            7 day startup

              This is the story about failure because all great entrepreneurs fail, and Dan Norris is no different. Dan is the passionate startup founder and award winning marketer behind wpcurve.com, one of the fastest growing WordPress support companies in the world. The 7 Day Startup is Dan’s bible for bootstrappers who want to launch a product. In this book he demonstrates that you don’t know how successful something will be until you launch it.

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              He gives practice advice on generating ideas and gaining your first paying customers, and how to build a website in 1 day for under $100. Read it before you launch.

              7. The Universe Has Your Back by Gabrielle Bernstein

              The Universe Has Your Back

                In The Universe Has Your Back, New York Times best-selling author Gabrielle Bernstein teaches us how to transform fear into faith so we can live a divine life. The stories in the book guide readers to release the blocks to happiness, security and direction to what they most long

                This book aims to give you a sense of power in a world where we often feel powerless. It will help you stop chasing your dreams and start living them.

                8. The 4-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferris

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                Four Hour Work Week

                  Tim Ferris is a serial entrepreneur, #1 New York Times bestselling author, best known for his rapid-learning techniques. In this book he will teach you how to forget the old concepts of work and retirement, and embrace success in these unpredictable economic times. The 4-Hour Workweek is the blueprint to living your dream, regardless of whether you want a high income, world-class travel or want to escape the rat race.

                  This book will show you how to live more and work less.

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                  Cate Scolnik

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                  1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 3 5 Values of an Effective Leader 4 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 5 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

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                  Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                  No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                  Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                  Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                  A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                  Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                  In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                  From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                  A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                  For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                  This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                  The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                  That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                  Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                  The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                  Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                  But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                  The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                  The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                  A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                  For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                  But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                  If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                  For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                  These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                  For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                  How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                  Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                  Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                  Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                  My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                  Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                  I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                  More on Building Habits

                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                  Reference

                  [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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